Tech

Research presented at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) describes a new class of radiopharmaceuticals, named radiohybrids (rh), that offer a fresh perspective on cancer imaging and radioligand therapy (theranostics). In addition, the technology encompasses a highly innovative and efficient isotopic labelling method to facilitate broad application.

NEW YORK, June 25, 2019 - In the 1860s, French physician Paul Broca published his findings that the brain's speech production center was located in the left hemisphere. Though scientists have largely accepted since then that the left half of the brain dominates language processing, the reasons behind this lateralization have remained unclear.

Worldwide, about 44 million people are living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or a related form of dementia. Although 82 percent of seniors in the United States say it's important to have their thinking or memory checked, only 16 percent say they receive regular cognitive assessments.

LA JOLLA, CA - Sorting through individual immune cells is a handy way to see how the body responds to disease. For years, researchers around the world have used a technique called flow cytometry to separate different types of immune cells, such as T cells, B cells and monocytes. But occasionally they'd see two cells stuck together as a "doublet." Many regarded doublets as an artefact of the flow cytometry process, and it was common place to "dump" those conjoined cells before gathering data.

The living cell can be viewed as a factory where protein machines are in charge of various processes, such as transport of material inside the cell or operations with other macromolecules like DNA. Their operation is typically fueled by ATP molecules, the major energy carrier in biological cells. The chemical energy gained through ATP hydrolysis is used by a protein machine to cyclically change its shape and thus to perform a particular function.

When a patient complains about chest pain, diagnosis will usually involve catheter angiography to evaluate the adequacy of blood supply to the heart. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have now established that, in certain cases, the diagnostic reliability of non-invasive coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography is as good as that of coronary angiography - thereby dispensing with the need for invasive procedures. Results from this research have been published in The BMJ*.

Long-term exposure to air pollution has been previously associated with a higher risk of hypertension in high-income countries, where air pollution levels are generally lower than in low- and middle-income countries. A team led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by "la Caixa", set out to study this association in India, a lower middle-income country where burdens of air pollution and hypertension are projected to increase. The results show that women exposed to higher levels of air pollution at residence have a higher hypertension prevalence.

Multi-junction solar cells are both the most efficient type of solar cell on the market today and the most expensive type of solar cell to produce. In a proof-of-concept paper, researchers from North Carolina State University detail a new approach for creating multi-junction solar cells using off-the-shelf components, resulting in lower cost, high-efficiency solar cells for use in multiple applications.

NEW YORK, June 24, 2019 -- Quantum computers, which use light particles (photons) instead of electrons to transmit and process data, hold the promise of a new era of research in which the time needed to realize lifesaving drugs and new technologies will be significantly shortened. Photons are promising candidates for quantum computation because they can propagate across long distances without losing information, but when they are stored in matter they become fragile and susceptible to decoherence.

The Goldilocks of fairy-tale fame knew something about porridge. It needed to be just right--neither too hot nor too cold. Same with furniture--neither too hard nor too soft. In a different context, scientists at UC San Diego know something about DNA. They know that the strands of our genetic code, if extended, would measure two meters, or about six feet. They also know that the strands fold into and move within the cell nucleus the size of about a hundredth of a millimeter. But they don't know how and in what state of matter this occurs, so they decided to check.

A new technology discovered by UConn School of Dental Medicine researchers records cellular communication in real time - providing a closer look into the dynamics of cell secretion and a greater understanding of how cells repair tissue.

In a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Kshitiz Gupta, an assistant professor (who goes by just his first name), and Yashir Suhail, a postdoctoral fellow, in the Dental School's Department of Biomedical Engineering, unlocked a breakthrough technology platform.

A new family of enzymes has been engineered to perform one of the most important steps in the conversion of plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics and chemicals.

The discovery was led by members of the same UK-US enzyme engineering team that, last year, engineered and improved a plastic-digesting enzyme, a potential breakthrough for the recycling of plastic waste. (Link)

Smoking increases both men's and women's risk of a major heart attack at all ages, but women smokers have a significantly higher increased risk compared to men, especially women under 50 years old, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Despite the increased risk, smokers can reduce their risk to that of a never smoker in as little as a month after quitting.

Washington, DC - June 24, 2019 - A team of investigators has developed a cancer vaccine technology using live, attenuated pathogens as vectors. A feature of the vaccine causes these bacteria to self-destruct once they've done their job, making it safe for use in humans. The research is published in Infection and Immunity, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Following a stroke, antibodies that inhibit the signaling molecule Nogo-A can help repair blood vessels in the affected brain regions. This also promotes the regaining of motor functions, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown in a mouse model. The study opens up new avenues for treatment.