DURHAM, N.C. -- Engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a device that can direct photons of light around sharp corners with virtually no losses due to backscattering, a key property that will be needed if electronics are ever to be replaced with light-based devices.

Tropical Cyclone 04S, known as Bouchra formed in the Southern Indian Ocean during the week of Nov. 12 and by the end of the week it had become a remnant low pressure area. Over the weekend of Nov. 17 and 18 it regenerated into a tropical cyclone and the NOAA-20 satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.

Although there is good news about smoking -- only 14 percent of Americans smoke, the lowest number ever, according to a 2017 National Health Interview Survey -- challenges remain. In a given year, more than 40 percent of smokers make no attempt to quit. For those who do, it can take many tries -- estimates vary from six to 30 -- before they succeed, if they ever do. If more smokers are to succeed in staying quit, a better understanding of the factors that hinder them from meeting smoking cessation milestones is needed.

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Parents who decline to get their child vaccinated against the flu may be exposed to a limited range of information, a new national poll suggests.

And depending on which sources parents turn to the most, inaccurate information may influence their decision about flu vaccine for their child.

Patients who have persistently high levels of inflammation following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for coronary artery disease are significantly more likely to die from any cause or to have a heart attack within a year, according to a study of 7,026 patients published in the European Heart Journal [1].

CHICAGO - A shoulder muscle that appears unusually bright on ultrasound may be a warning sign of diabetes, according to a study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Ultrasound is commonly used to diagnose sources of pain in the shoulder. More than 10 years ago, musculoskeletal radiologist Steven B. Soliman, D.O., from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, began noticing a pattern when images of the deltoid muscle, the largest muscle of the shoulder, appeared bright on ultrasound.

AMHERST, Mass. - Until recently, scientists thought of viruses as mostly small infectious agents, tiny compared to typical bacteria and human cells. So imagine the surprise when biologist Jeff Blanchard and Ph.D. student Lauren Alteio at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), discovered giant viruses - relatively speaking the size of Macy's parade day balloons - in soil at Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts.

The tissues in our bodies largely are made of fluid. It moves around cells and is essential to normal body function.

But in some cases, this fluid may be doing more harm than good.

In people who have glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer, this fluid has a much higher pressure, causing it to move fast and forcing cancer cells to spread. And a common cancer therapy, which inserts a drug directly into the tumor with a catheter, can make this fluid move even faster.

Bridgett vonHoldt is best known for her work with dogs and wolves, so she was surprised when a bird biologist pulled her aside and said, "I really think you can help me solve this problem." So she turned to a mystery he'd been wrestling with for more than 20 years.

WASHINGTON, D.C., November 18, 2018 -- Wombats, the chubby and beloved, short-legged marsupials native to Australia, are central to a biological mystery in the animal kingdom: How do they produce cube-shaped poop? Patricia Yang, a postdoctoral fellow in mechanical engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, set out to investigate.

Yang studies the hydrodynamics of fluids, including blood, processed food and urine, in the bodies of animals. She was curious how the differences in wombats' digestive processes and soft tissue structures might explain their oddly shaped scat.