While Intermittent fasting may sound like another dieting craze, the practice of routinely not eating and drinking for short periods of time has shown again to lead to potentially better health outcomes.

In a new study by researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have found that cardiac catheterization patients who practiced regular intermittent fasting lived longer than patients who don't. In addition, the study found that patients who practice intermittent fasting are less likely to be diagnosed with heart failure.

Semiconductors convert energy from photons (light) into an electron current. However, some photons carry too much energy for the material to absorb. These photons produce 'hot electrons', and the excess energy of these electrons is converted into heat. Materials scientists have been looking for ways to harvest this excess energy. Scientists from the University of Groningen and Nanyang Technological University (Singapore) have now shown that this may be easier than expected by combining a perovskite with an acceptor material for 'hot electrons'.

Study finds significant improvements in vascular health of chronic smokers who transition to e-cigarettes

Women see greater health benefits than men following switch to e-cigarettes

VESUVIUS is the largest study to-date on the vascular impact of e-cigarettes versus tobacco cigarettes

Cigarette smokers who switch to nicotine containing vaporisers could significantly improve their vascular health, a major University of Dundee study has concluded.

Using a relevant animal model (pigs), University of Saskatchewan researchers have shown that mild Zika virus infection in fetuses can cause abnormal brain development in apparently healthy young animals.

The study, published Nov. 14 in PLOS Pathogens, provides new insights into the potential outcomes of Zika virus infection and could point to new prevention and treatment strategies to alleviate the long-term effects of Zika virus infection.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Philippine Sea, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Depression Kalmaegi.

Researchers in Japan and the U.K. have discovered new details of how young leaves build their first chloroplasts, the energy factories of plant cells. The researchers identified a new role for a protein that was first identified 25 years ago, but had defied characterization until now.

Artificial muscles will power the soft robots and wearable devices of the future. But more needs to be understood about the underlying mechanics of these powerful structures in order to design and build new devices.

Now, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have uncovered some of the fundamental physical properties of artificial muscle fibers.

Tokyo, Japan - Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have developed a low-temperature catalyst for removing NOx gas from industrial exhaust using ammonia. Composed of bulk "defective" vanadium oxide instead of vanadium oxides supported on titanium oxide like in commercial catalysts, the catalyst works at lower temperatures (

As an alternative to the depletion of fossil resources, the reduction of CO2 emitted from fossil fuel combustion into valuable chemicals and fuel has drawn increasing attention. Due to the highly thermodynamic stability of CO2, it is still very challenging to find a sustainable and cost-efficient route to selectively convert inert CO2 at a high conversion rate under mild conditions.

Electrochromic films that display reversible spectral and color changes in response to electric or electrochemical stimulus are highly useful in a wide range of applications, such as smart windows, electronic displays, dynamic camouflage, and information storage. For practical applications, electrochromism with low operation voltage, high contrast ratio (in general no less than 30%), short response time (a few seconds or less), and excellent cyclic stability (at least over 1000 cycles) is required.