Body

New Haven, Conn. -- Doctors at Yale New Haven Hospital used a more aggressive selection process to more than quadruple the number of heart transplants performed there while maintaining positive patient outcomes, according to a new study.

The findings suggest that a more inclusive approach to selecting donor hearts and transplant recipients can enable hospitals to successfully treat more patients in need of transplants. The study appears online Sept. 18 in the journal JAMA Network Open.

What The Editorial Says: Authors of this editorial review the evidence for the management of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that may apply to patients with severe COVID-19, what has been learned about treatment of these patients, and the gaps in knowledge that remain.

Authors: Carolyn S. Calfee, M.D., M.A.S., of the University of California, San Francisco, is the corresponding author.

Allowing yourself a few minutes of downtime significantly boosts mental and physical relaxation. Research by psychologists at the University of Konstanz observed higher levels of psychological and physiological relaxation in people after only ten minutes of receiving a massage. Even ten minutes of simple rest increased relaxation, albeit to a lesser degree than massage.

The melanoma is a malignant tumor of the pigment cells. If diagnosed early, the tumor can be removed completely - and the chances of recovery are good. But in later stages, when the tumor has already spread or formed metastases in other parts of the body, the prospects become worse for those affected.

No effect for a good half of patients

A deadly combination of two mosquito-borne viruses may be a trigger for stroke, new research published in the The Lancet Neurology has found.

Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this opinion article the authors Fengyi Zeng, Xiaowen Liang and Zhiyi Chen from The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China consider new roles for clinicians in the age of artificial intelligence (AI).

School closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted access to low or no-cost school breakfast and lunch programs for millions of low-income children. States and school districts developed innovative solutions to meet the nutritional needs of children and respond to the rapidly growing food insecurity crisis, yet the number of replacement meals is likely far short of what they provided prior to the pandemic, according to a study led by a researcher at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. The findings are published in the American Journal of Public Health.

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Researchers know from many previous studies what prevents cash-strapped shoppers in underserved communities from buying more fresh produce. But little is known about which strategies are most likely to reach the people who need them, or have the most success in improving the diets of people in lower income areas.

An immunotherapy drug called 'avelumab' has been shown to significantly improve survival in patients with the most common type of bladder cancer, according to results from a phase III clinical trial led by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Cancer Centre, UK.

This is the first time an immune therapy has resulted in a survival advantage in this setting in bladder cancer, and will potentially benefit thousands of patients each year.

An international research team of Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has discovered that controlling the nuclear localization of the PD-L1 immune checkpoint protein can enhance the efficacy of immunotherapy for cancer treatment

Based on reported cases, Unverricht-Lundborg disease, also known as progressive myoclonic epilepsy-1A, EPM1, is more common in Finland than anywhere else in the world, a new study finds. The researchers combined data from various registers and hospital records to explore the prevalence and disease course of EPM1 in Finland. Published in Neurology, the study was carried out in collaboration between the North Karelia Central Hospital, the University of Turku, Kuopio University Hospital, the University of Eastern Finland, and Turku University Hospital.

Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) in collaboration with Takeda-CiRA program and other international institutions have developed a Polygenic Risk Score to help predict drug-induced liver injury, validated by patients' genomic data, cell cultures and organoids

Researchers have identified a second path to defeating chronic myelogenous leukemia, which tends to affect older adults, even in the face of resistance to existing drugs.

The new findings were published on September 17th in Nature Communications.

Take a sniff of a freshly poured glass of wine, and the prevailing scientific thinking would suggest that the harmony of fragrances you perceive starts with sensory receptors in your nose simply adding up the individual odors they encounter. However, new research from Kyushu University shows that a much more complex process is occurring, with some responses being enhanced and others inhibited depending on the odors present.

Scientists from the Department of Cell Biology of the University of Malaga (UMA) and the Andalusian Centre for Nanomedicine and Biotechnology (BIONAND) have made progress in finding new rapid implementation therapies to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, identifying a new drug that could prevent or mitigate the consequences derived from SARS-CoV-2 infection.