Body

PORTLAND, Oregon - To help stem the nationwide opioid epidemic and related increases in HIV, hepatitis C and other infections, health care providers should routinely screen and treat patients for opioid abuse when they come to clinics and hospitals seeking other services.

That's one of five recommendations outlined in a paper published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The paper supports a newly published document that outlines the proceedings of a March 12, 2018, workshop convened on the topic by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

Mailing colorectal cancer screening tests to patients insured by Medicaid increased screening rates for this population, report researchers at the University of North Carolina Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Bottom Line: A study of two generations of women in England examined how common depression during pregnancy (prenatal depression) is in young mothers now compared with their mothers' generation. Depressed mood was measured using self-reported surveys in both generations and analysis of the data suggests depression in young pregnant women may be higher now than among their mothers' generation in the 1990s. Researchers acknowledge a number of plausible explanations for their findings requiring further study.

MINNEAPOLIS, MN- July 13, 2018- The behavior of people who remain committed to a choice, even when it is clear that an alternate choice would be a better option, has been a perplexing phenomenon to psychologists and economists. For example, people will continue to wait in the slow line at a grocery store, stick out an unhealthy relationship, or refuse to abandon an expensive, wasteful project - all because such individuals have already invested time, effort, or money. This well-known cognitive phenomenon termed the "sunk cost fallacy" has long been considered a problem unique to humans.

Residential segregation is linked to many racial disparities in health, including cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Now, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers suggests the likelihood of dying from gun violence can be added to the list of adverse health outcomes associated with structural racism in the US.

The ability to obtain new memories in adulthood may depend on neurogenesis -- the generation of new neurons in the hippocampus -- to clear out old memories that have been safely stored in the cortex, according to research in male rats published in JNeurosci.

Previous research suggests that the hippocampus has a finite capacity to acquire and store new memories. It is unknown how the brain compensates for this limitation to facilitate learning throughout life.

SEATTLE - A new scientific study finds 93 million people live in remote areas with venomous snakes and, if bitten, face a greater likelihood of dying than those in urban settings because of poor access to anti-venom medications.

The study, conducted by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington, was published today in the international medical journal, The Lancet.

A trade deal between the UK and USA could risk increasing drug prices in the UK, which could diminish the affordability and accessibility of the NHS, according to a Viewpoint published in The Lancet.

The opinion piece outlines how the USA's targeting of so-called 'foreign free-riding' in trade deals could lead to a poor deal on pharmaceuticals for the UK post-Brexit. The authors raise concerns that the USA could pressure the UK to change the way it regulates pharmaceuticals in trade deals.

BOSTON - Previous studies have shown that when all members of the clinical care team feel comfortable speaking up, team performance improves. With intimate knowledge of patients' wishes, medical histories and clinical conditions, patients and their families are increasingly considered crucial members of the optimal patient-centered care team. However, to have an impact on patient safety, patients and families must feel comfortable voicing concerns about care to the medical team.

In areas of the country disproportionately affected by the opioid crisis, treatment programs are less likely to accept patients paying through insurance of any type or accept pregnant women, a new Vanderbilt study found.