Body

DALLAS, Oct. 17, 2019 -- Young adults who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be more likely to experience a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or major stroke event by middle age, raising the risk as much as other better-known risk factors, according to new research published in Stroke, a journal of the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association.

When young athletes experiences sudden cardiac death as they run down the playing field, it's usually due to arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), an inherited heart disease. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have shed new light on the role of the immune system in the progression of ACM and, in the process, discovered a new drug that might help prevent ACM disease symptoms and progression to heart failure in some patients.

SINGAPORE, 17 October 2019 - A congenital heart condition known as left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC) - which occurs when muscly projections in the embryonic heart fail to transform into compact heart muscle - could be caused by signalling defects, according to new preclinical research led by Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore. The finding, published in the journal JCI Insight, could pave the way towards potential diagnosis and therapies.

A team of researchers led by Yale-NUS College has found evidence that metabolic dysfunction is a primary cause of Alzheimer's disease.

A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction found a positive link between the number of people in England giving up smoking when using e-cigarettes to try and quit.

Philadelphia, October 17, 2019 - Not all fats are equal in how they affect our skin, according to a new study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier. The investigators found that different ketogenic diets impacted skin inflammation differently in psoriasiform-like skin inflammation in mice.

Sophia Antipolis, 17 October 2019: Drinking small amounts of alcohol frequently is linked with a higher likelihood of atrial fibrillation than binge drinking, according to research published today in EP Europace, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1

A multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating a new artificial pancreas system - which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels - has found that the new system was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes.

A multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating a new artificial pancreas system -- which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels -- has found that the new system was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes. The trial, based partly at the University of Virginia Center for Diabetes Technology, was primarily funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health.

A new artificial pancreas system that uses advanced control algorithms to automatically monitor and regulate blood glucose levels was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes, according to a multicenter randomized clinical trial based partly at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

PHOENIX - A University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix research team has developed a blood self-collection device to quickly estimate a person's exposure to radiation in the event of a nuclear accident or attack.

Led by Jian Gu, PhD, and scientists at the medical school's Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine (ANBM), the study reports development of a system for packaging critical components of a traditional blood-collection kit to create an integrated fingerstick blood collector for radiation countermeasures.

CHICAGO --- Northwestern Medicine scientists have used patient-derived neurons to develop and test a new strategy to treat Parkinson's disease by mitigating the effects of harmful genetic mutations, as detailed in a study published today (Oct. 16) in Science Translational Medicine.

Fatty liver disease is contributing to an increase in liver cancer and basic scientists at The University of Texas Health Science at Houston (UTHealth) have new insight as to why.

In the journal Cancer Research, the investigators report that in mouse models, excess fat impairs the ability of a tumor-suppressing protein named HNF4α to do its job.

Research led by the Universities of Birmingham and Manchester has made a connection between the way baby wallabies produce male hormones and how some human girls are born with genitalia that resemble those of a boy.

The research, published in PNAS and supported by the Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council, shows that an alternative pathway to the production of active male hormones - previously identified in the tammar wallaby pouch young - is present and active during human fetal development.

A study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators may help explain why even people benefiting from medications for their epilepsy often continue to experience bouts of difficulty thinking, perceiving and remembering clearly.

The cause is a pathological buzz of electrical brain activity that interferes with the brain's normal activity. The researchers said that certain medications or implantable devices could be improved to alleviate these cognitive deficits.

A paper describing the findings will be published Oct. 16 in Science Translational Medicine.