Body

(WASHINGTON, October 17, 2019) -- Among patients with multiple myeloma, African Americans and Hispanics start treatment with a novel therapy significantly later than white patients, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. The study found that on average it took about three months for white patients to start novel therapy after diagnosis, while for both African Americans and Hispanics it took about five months.

HOUSTON, Texas - Researchers have found that carriers of the most common genetic variant that causes cystic fibrosis experience some symptoms similar to those of people with cystic fibrosis. These findings were enabled by large-scale genomic data made available just a few years ago. Yu-Chung (Jerry) Lin, BA, MSc, a graduate student at the University of Toronto, presented the research at the American Society of Human Genetics 2019 Annual Meeting in Houston, Texas.

A new American Cancer Society study links health insurance literacy with medical financial hardship as well as non-medical financial sacrifices among adult cancer survivors in the United States. The authors say the study indicates that health insurance literacy may be an important intervention for addressing financial problems associated with cancer. The report appears in JNCI Cancer Spectrum.

LA JOLLA--(October 17, 2019) Although graduating from school, a first job and marriage can be important events in life, some of the most significant events happen far earlier: in the first few days after a sperm fertilizes an egg and the cell begins to divide.

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Prolonged exposure to blue light, such as that which emanates from your phone, computer and household fixtures, could be affecting your longevity, even if it's not shining in your eyes.

New research at Oregon State University suggests that the blue wavelengths produced by light-emitting diodes damage cells in the brain as well as retinas.

What The Study Did: About 1,400 young children in Hong Kong had eye exams to see if those exposed to secondhand smoke at home had differences in choroidal thickness, a layer of the eye that contains blood vessels and connective tissue, compared to children not exposed to smoke.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

Authors: Jason C. Yam, F.R.C.S.Ed., of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, is the corresponding author.

What The Study Did: Researchers investigated whether frail or elderly patients with head and neck cancer have worse depression or higher rates of regret after surgery.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

Authors: David P. Goldstein, M.D., M.Sc., of the University of Toronto, is the corresponding author.

(doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2019.3020)

What The Study Did: Researchers in this observational study examined if aspirin use after a diagnosis of a biliary tract cancer, which includes gallbladder cancer, was associated with reduced risk of death among nearly 3,000 patients.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

Authors: Sarah S. Jackson, Ph.D., of the National Cancer Institute in Rockville, Maryland, is the corresponding author.

(doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.4328)

For the first time, it has been shown that deficits of semantic memory, an ability we use to recognize objects and use them correctly, are involved in specific eating disorders shared by patients suffering from dementia. This is suggested by a study conducted by the Laboratory of Professor Raffaella Rumiati of SISSA in Trieste just published in the Journal of Neuropsychology.

Green areas in the inner city can directly improve the wellbeing of urban citizens. This is the result of an interdisciplinary study, in which Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) was involved. According to the study, people with a reduced brain capacity to self-regulate negative feelings benefit most from the green areas. The study combining epidemiology, psychology, neural imaging, and geo informatics is reported in Nature Neuroscience (DOI 10.1038/s41593-019-0451-y).

Since its invention during the Second World War for soldiers stationed in countries where malaria transmission rates were high, researchers have worked to pinpoint precisely how DEET actually affects mosquitos.

(Boston)--Does yo-yo dieting drive compulsive eating? There may be a connection.

According to Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers the chronic cyclic pattern of overeating followed by undereating, reduces the brain's ability to feel reward and may drive compulsive eating. This finding suggests that future research into treatment of compulsive eating behavior should focus on rebalancing the mesolimbic dopamine system--the part of the brain responsible for feeling reward or pleasure.

An artificial intelligence (AI) tool--trained on roughly a million screening mammography images--identified breast cancer with approximately 90 percent accuracy when combined with analysis by radiologists, a new study finds.

Led by researchers from NYU School of Medicine and the NYU Center for Data Science, the study examined the ability of a type of AI, a machine learning computer program, to add value to the diagnoses reached by a group of 14 radiologists as they reviewed 720 mammogram images.

There is no effective vaccine currently available to prevent Lyme disease in humans.

Experts from academia, government, and industry convened at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's Banbury Center to tackle this public health challenge. Now, a new paper published in the October 17 2019 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases highlights the conference discussions, reiterates the need to stop the infection, and defines a strategy for developing effective vaccines.

A chance finding ten years ago led to the creation by researchers of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) of the first mice born with much longer telomeres than normal in their species. Given the relationship between telomeres and ageing - telomeres shorten throughout life, so older organisms have shorter telomeres -, scientists launched a study generating mice in which 100% of their cells had hyper-long telomeres.