Body

Young children explore the world by putting things in their mouths. While many of these items are relatively harmless, some can cause serious injuries and require immediate medical attention. A new study from researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for children younger than six years who were treated in a U.S. emergency department due to concern of a foreign body ingestion from 1995 through 2015.

Lisbon, Portugal - 12 April 2019: Prolong your life by increasing your muscle power. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a congress of the European Society of Cardiology.1

Lisbon, Portugal - 12 April 2019: Kicking the habit works best in pairs. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1

A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which uses research by Rutgers University, shows a significant increase in the percentage of 4-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder in New Jersey.

The study found the rate increased 43 percent from 2010 to 2014 in the state.

The report, released April 11, found that about one in 59 children has autism. New Jersey's rate was the highest of the states studied: one in 35. That puts the national rate of autism at 1.7 percent of the childhood population and New Jersey's autism rate at 3 percent.

PULLMAN, Wash. - Washington State University researchers have found a way to make food taste salty but with less of the sodium chloride tied to poor health.

"It's a stealth approach, not like buying the 'reduced salt' option, which people generally don't like," said Carolyn Ross, a Food Science professor at WSU. "If we can stair-step people down, then we increase health while still making food that people want to eat."

A new technique for the decontamination of organs before transplantation using ultraviolet and red light irradiation has been developed by Brazilian and Canadian researchers and is described in an article published in the journal Nature Communications.

Little is known about the potential health effects of JUUL e-cigarette products that have recently risen in popularity, especially among adolescents. The Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, has a growing concern about this uptick in their use because these electronic cigarettes deliver nicotine -- a highly addictive stimulant, with potential to affect the still-developing adolescent brain.

(Boston)--Using an experimental positron emission tomography (PET) scan, researchers have found elevated amounts of abnormal tau protein in brain regions affected by chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in a small group of living former National Football League (NFL) players with cognitive, mood and behavior symptoms. The study was published online in the New England Journal of Medicine.

11 April 2019, Vienna, Austria: A prespecified interim analysis of the ongoing Phase 3 REGENERATE study has confirmed that obeticholic acid (OCA) is effective in the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with liver fibrosis. The 18-month analysis, which was reported today at The International Liver Congress™ 2019 in Vienna, Austria, demonstrated that the 25 mg dose of OCA studied improved fibrosis in almost one-quarter of recipients, with significant improvements also reported in other histological markers of NASH.

Stress related disorders--conditions triggered by a significant life event or trauma--may be linked to a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), finds a large Swedish study published in The BMJ today.

The risk of severe and acute CVD events, such as cardiac arrest and heart attack, was particularly high in the first six months after diagnosis of a stress related disorder, and within the first year for other types of CVD.