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CORVALLIS, Ore. - Young people who identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual are at increased risk of using substances such as alcohol, nicotine and marijuana, a new study from Oregon State University has found.

These youth are also at higher risk of polysubstance use, meaning they are more likely to use more than one substance than their heterosexual peers. The study was just published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

An analysis of UK newspaper reporting of the NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) between 2010 and 2015 shows that despite some critical analysis, the mostly positive stories are likely to have contributed to the CDF's continuation, despite mounting evidence of its ineffectiveness. Close to £1.4 billion in total has been spent through the CDF which has subsequently been reconfigured and is now under the control of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

GALVESTON, Texas -Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that testosterone replacement therapy may slow disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The paper is currently available in Chronic Respiratory Disease.

Doctors and nurses are always grateful when they are given advance notice that a patient is about to seriously deteriorate (or 'crash', to use today's clinical vernacular). Recent years have seen important advances towards this goal in the form of what are known as 'Clinical Early Warning Scores.' These simple computational tools are intended to help predict future clinical deterioration, often related to the onset of sepsis.

Long-term use of anti-cancer drugs treatment may lead to the development of multiple drug resistance reducing the efficiency of chemotherapy. Scientists are aware of several mechanisms for drug resistance development in tumor cells. They are to a great extent associated with the activation of proteins that get medicinal drugs out of cells, as well as with changes in the genes controlling cell survival and programmed cell death (apoptosis).

The timing of seizures may be linked to natural rhythms in around 80% of people with epilepsy, according to the largest study of individual patients' seizure cycles including more than 1,000 people, published in The Lancet Neurology journal.

Most people's seizures occurred in a circadian (ie, 24-hour) rhythm, but some people experienced weekly and 3-weekly cycles in their seizures, and some had a combination of daily, weekly or longer cycles associated with their seizures.

Figures published by The BMJ today show how crowdfunding for alternative therapies for patients with terminal cancer has soared in recent years. But there are fears that huge sums are being raised for treatments that are not backed by evidence and which, in some cases, may even do then harm.

As such, there are now calls for crowdfunding sites to vet cancer appeals to help ensure that patients and their donors are not being exploited, writes freelance journalist Melanie Newman.

Half of clinical trials on the EU register have not reported results, despite rules requiring results to be posted within 12 months of completion, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

Taking high dose folic acid supplements in later pregnancy (beyond the first trimester) does not prevent pre-eclampsia in women at high risk for this condition, finds a randomised controlled trial published by The BMJ today.

However, taking low dose folic acid supplements before and during early pregnancy to prevent birth defects, such as spina bifida, is still strongly recommended for all women, say the researchers.

Products containing the withdrawn blood pressure drug valsartan are not associated with a markedly increased short term risk of cancer, finds an expedited analysis published by The BMJ today.

The findings provide reassuring interim evidence about the risk of cancer in patients treated with valsartan products, but the authors say further studies are required to evaluate the risks for single cancers as well as longer term effects.