Feed aggregator

Researchers find first evidence of sub-Saharan Africa glassmaking

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Scholars from Rice University, University College London and the Field Museum have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans, a finding that the researchers said represents a 'new chapter in the history of glass technology.'
Categories: Content

Method uses DNA, nanoparticles and lithography to make optically active structures

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Northwestern University researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices -- news to make the ears of Star Trek's Spock perk up. Using DNA as a key tool, the scientists took gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes and arranged them in two and three dimensions to form optically active superlattices. The structures could be programmed to exhibit almost any color across the visible spectrum.
Categories: Content

Cancer gene screening more cost effective in the general population than high-risk groups

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that screening the general population for mutations in specific genes is a more cost effective way to detect people at risk and prevents more breast and ovarian cancers compared to only screening patients with a personal or family history of these diseases.
Categories: Content

More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer risk

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Data collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease, according to a new collaborative study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and Tufts University School of Medicine and Cancer Center.
Categories: Content

New robot can help treat rare birth defect

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Researchers at the University of Sheffield and Boston's Children Hospital, Harvard Medical School have created a robot that can be implanted into the body to aid the treatment of oesophageal atresia, a rare birth defect that affects a baby's oesophagus.
Categories: Content

Single blood test screens for eight cancer types

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.
Categories: Content

Crop failure in the Andes

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
As co-author of a study published in Global Change Biology, Kenneth Feeley, along with fellow biologist, Richard Tito, a native Quechua Indian from the region and the study's first author, discovered that tough times lie ahead for rural farmers growing the Andes' staple crops -- corn and potatoes.
Categories: Content

Crystal clear

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam-sensitive crystalline materials.
Categories: Content

Using data mining to make sense of climate change

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Georgia Techhas developed a new way of mining data from climate data sets that is more self-contained than traditional tools. The methodology brings out commonalities of data sets without as much expertise from the user, allowing scientists to trust the data and get more robust -- and transparent -- results.
Categories: Content

Fanged friends: World's most vilified and dangerous animals may be humankind's best ally

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
An international review led by the University of Queensland and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) says that many native carnivores that live in and around human habitation are declining at an unprecedented rate - spelling bad news for humans who indirectly rely on them for a variety of beneficial services.
Categories: Content

Counting chromosomes: Plant scientists solve a century-old mystery about reproduction

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Geneticists have solved a century-old mystery by discovering a remarkable mechanism that enables plants to count their chromosomes. Their ability to detect imbalances in male and female contributions to the next generation determines their progeny's viability and fertility.
Categories: Content

Research reveals atomic-level changes in ALS-linked protein

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
A new study details the minute changes -- down to the level of individual atoms -- that cause a particular protein to form cell-damaging clumps associated with ALS and other diseases.
Categories: Content

Babies' babbling betters brains, language

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Babies are adept at getting what they need -- including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key.
Categories: Content

Can mice really mirror humans when it comes to cancer?

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
A new Michigan State University study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer. The findings reveal how mice can actually mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral and esophagus.
Categories: Content

DNA study casts light on century-old mystery of how cells divide

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Scientists have solved a longstanding puzzle of how cells are able to tightly package lengthy strands of DNA when they divide -- an essential process for growth, repair and maintenance in living organisms.
Categories: Content

Bacteria under your feet

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
In cooperation with Universidad Rey Juan Carlos - URJCAn international team of researchers, including ERC grantee Fernando T. Maestre from Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), pieced together a global atlas of soil bacteria. The study, published today in Science, identifies some five hundred species of dominant bacteria living in soils worldwide. The findings, based on EU-funded research, could open new paths to improve soil fertility and increase agricultural production.
Categories: Content

Network model of the musculoskeletal system predicts compensatory injuries

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
A new study led by Danielle Bassett at The University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science is the first to convert the entire human body's network of bones and muscles into a comprehensive mathematical model. A study of the network is publishing on Jan. 18 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.
Categories: Content

The flu vaccine could get a much-needed boost

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help lower that figure for future flu seasons.
Categories: Content

Fox Creek earthquakes linked to completion volume and location of hydraulic fracturing

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
The volume of hydraulic fracturing fluid and the location of well pads control the frequency and occurrence of measurable earthquakes, new Alberta Geological Survey and UAlberta research has found.
Categories: Content

Controlling nanoscale DNA robots from the macroscale

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
By powering a DNA nanorobotic arm with electric fields, scientists have achieved precise nano-scale movement that is at least five orders of magnitude faster than previously reported for DNA-driven robotic systems.
Categories: Content