Brain

Given the critical role livestock play in Mongolia, transmission of tick-borne diseases can have very real health and economic implications for livestock and the herders that tend to them. Dr. Michael von Fricken explored this association using a multidisciplinary One Health research approach, which focused on the interaction between nomadic herders, the livestock they own, and the tick-borne diseases they are exposed to. von Fricken spent a year living in Ulaanbataar as a postdoc with Duke University, under Dr.

Children who have been spanked by their parents by age 5 show an increase in behavior problems at age 6 and age 8 relative to children who have never been spanked, according to new findings in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

At the base of the Transantarctic Mountains lies a geological oddity. Don Juan Pond is one of the saltiest bodies of water on the planet, filled with a dense, syrupy brine rich in calcium chloride that can remain liquid to minus 50 degrees Celsius, far below the freezing point of water. But the source of water and salt to this unusual pond remains a mystery -- even as hints emerge that water in a similar form could exist on Mars.

Altruistic people are said to be "kind hearted" - and new research published in the journal Scientific Reports shows that generous people really are more in touch with their own hearts.

The study, carried out at Anglia Ruskin University and Stockholm University, is the first to find a possible physiological reason why some people are more charitable than others.

Participants were asked to take part in a computer-based game that involved repeated choices to share sums of money between themselves and another participant that they hadn't met.

The cohort study of nearly 80,000 UK women giving birth in the NHS in England, led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with the University of Cambridge, showed that inducing first-time mothers aged 35 or over 1-2 weeks earlier was linked to the risk of perinatal death - the stillbirth or death of a baby within seven days of birth - falling from 26 per 10,000 pregnancies to 8 per 10,000 pregnancies.

TORONTO, Tuesday, November 14, 2017 While vaccinations protect children against various illnesses, the pain can sometimes be too much to bear. It's no wonder most children and parents dread their vaccination appointments. Now new research from York University's OUCH Cohort at the Faculty of Health found that the amount of distress and pain felt by a preschooler during a vaccination is strongly related to how their parents help them cope before and during an appointment.

Increased time spent in front of a screen -- in the form of computers, cell phones and tablets -- might have contributed to an uptick in symptoms of depression and suicide-related behaviors and thoughts in American young people, especially girls, according to a new study by San Diego State University professor of psychology Jean Twenge. The findings point to the need for parents to monitor how much time their children are spending in front of media screens.

To retain more undergraduate women in geoscience majors, a supportive network that includes faculty mentorship seems to be a key driver, according to a new study led by Colorado State University.

The study, published earlier this month in the journal PLOS ONE, is the first official result from an ongoing effort led by Emily Fischer, assistant professor of atmospheric science.

In work published in Physical Review Letters, scientists from RIKEN in Japan have discovered interesting new magnetic properties of a type of materials known as "quantum spin ice." These materials demonstrate interesting properties as they behave as "frustrated magnets"--systems that can settle into various magnetic states because of their special geometry. One important property of these materials is that they have virtual monopoles--particles that are either north or south but not like typical magnets, which invariably have both a north and south pole confined together.

Women at opposite extremes of the weight spectrum have low levels of the neuroactive steroid allopregnanolone, according to new research published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

Previous research has linked low levels of allopregnanolone -- known to scientists as "allo" -- to depression and anxiety, which are common mood disorders associated with anorexia nervosa and obesity.