Brain

Cockatoos go to carpentry school

Cockatoos go to carpentry school

Goffin's cockatoos can learn how to make and use wooden tools from each other, a new study has found.

The discovery, made by scientists from Oxford University, the University of Vienna, and the Max Planck Institute at Seewiesen, is thought to be the first controlled experimental evidence for the social transmission of tool use in any bird species.

Estrogen increases cannabis sensitivity

Estrogen increases cannabis sensitivity

PULLMAN, Wash. - Smoking today's concentrated pot might be risky business for women, according to new research from Washington State University. The study is the first to demonstrate sex differences in the development of tolerance to THC.

More than half of biology majors are women, yet gender gaps remain in science classrooms

More than half of biology majors are women, yet gender gaps remain in science classrooms

Tempe, Ariz. — Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields are traditionally heavily dominated by males, which is of great concern to universities as they try to improve student retention and achievement. One exception to that trend is in the field of biology. Of undergraduate biology majors, more than 60 percent are female and about half of biosciences graduate students are women.

Early cerebellum injury hinders neural development, possible root of autism

Early cerebellum injury hinders neural development, possible root of autism

A brain region largely known for coordinating motor control has a largely overlooked role in childhood development that could reveal information crucial to understanding the onset of autism, according to Princeton University researchers.

Singaporean birth cohort study finds benefits for babies exposed to 2 languages

Singaporean birth cohort study finds benefits for babies exposed to 2 languages

Singapore— A team of investigators and clinician-scientists in Singapore and internationally have found that there are advantages associated with exposure to two languages in infancy.

Study indicates that the hippocampus mediates cognitive decline in Huntington's disease

Experiences make you happier than possessions -- Before and after

To get the most enjoyment out of our dollar, science tells us to focus our discretionary spending on experiences such as travel over material goods. A new Cornell University study shows that the enjoyment we derive from experiential purchases may begin even before we buy.

This research offers important information for individual consumers who are trying to "decide on the right mix of material and experiential consumption for maximizing well-being," said psychology researcher and study author Thomas Gilovich of Cornell University.

Brain circuit differences reflect divisions in social status

Life at opposite ends of primate social hierarchies is linked to specific brain networks, a new Oxford University study has shown.

University of Houston researcher looks at the future of higher education

Most forecasts about the future of higher education have focused on how the institutions themselves will be affected – including the possibility of less demand for classes on campus and fewer tenured faculty members as people take courses online. Some changes already have begun.

When researchers at the University of Houston tackled the issue, they focused instead on what students will need in the future, including improved mentoring, personalized learning and feedback in real time.

The UH researchers identified three key themes:

Muslim headscarf may buffer against negative body image among women

Researchers have found that British Muslim women who wear a hijab generally have more positive body image, are less reliant on media messages about beauty ideals, and place less importance on appearance than those who do not wear a hijab. These effects appear to be driven by use of a hijab specifically, rather than religiosity.