Brain

A flawed measure

A flawed measure

Fit or fat? How about both?

In what could be the death knell for that once-vaunted measure of health known as BMI (body mass index), new research out of UC Santa Barbara and UCLA reveals that millions of Americans labeled overweight or obese based on their BMI are, in fact, "perfectly healthy."

Their findings, which appear in the International Journal of Obesity, suggest that 34.4 million Americans considered overweight by virtue of BMI are actually healthy, as are 19.8 million who are considered obese.

Cells that show where things are going

Cells that show where things are going

Aggression causes new nerve cells to be generated in the brain

Aggression causes new nerve cells to be generated in the brain

A group of neurobiologists from Russia and the USA, including Dmitry Smagin, Tatyana Michurina, and Grigori Enikolopov from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), have proven experimentally that aggression has an influence on the production of new nerve cells in the brain. The scientists conducted a series of experiments on male mice and published their findings in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience.

Study suggests more effective speech therapy approach for children with Down syndrome

Study suggests more effective speech therapy approach for children with Down syndrome

A new study indicates that children with Down syndrome who have motor speech deficits have been inadequately diagnosed, which could have a major impact on the interventions used by speech pathologists when treating patients.

First-of-its-kind study explains why rest is critical after a concussion

First-of-its-kind study explains why rest is critical after a concussion

WASHINGTON -- Doctors who order several days of rest after a person suffers a concussion are giving sound advice, say researchers, and new data from animal models explains why.

Faces of black children as young as 5 evoke negative biases

A new study suggests that people are more likely to misidentify a toy as a weapon after seeing a Black face than a White face, even when the face in question is that of a five-year-old child.

The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Pilot study shows meditation can help US veterans manage chronic pain

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Feb. 5, 2016) --They return to the United States with multiple types of trauma, and suffer from one of the highest rates of chronic pain of any population in the United States. They are U.S. veterans. A major challenge for health care providers is how to help them alleviate pain that will last a lifetime. Now, a new study suggests veterans may be empowered to help themselves with the practice of meditation.

Scientists find brain plasticity assorted into functional networks

The brain still has a lot to learn about itself. Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have made a key finding of the striking differences in how the brain's cells can change through experience.

Their results were published this week in PLOS ONE.

Meaningful media may push altruism across bounds of race and age

People who watch meaningful entertainment may be more willing to lend a hand to people they consider different, according to researchers.

After watching a meaningful clip from a television show, participants in a study were more likely to help someone from a different age and race than they were people in their own age and racial groups, according to Erica Bailey, doctoral student in mass communication, Penn State.

Researchers hone in on why female newborns are better protected from brain injury

MADISON, Wis. - Each year, thousands of newborn babies suffer complications during pregnancy or birth that deprive their brains of oxygen and nutrient-rich blood and result in brain injury. This deprivation results in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), which can lead to long-term neurological issues such as learning disabilities, cerebral palsy or even death.

Researchers have known for some time that male infants are more vulnerable to HIE than females, but why this gender difference exists has remained a mystery.