Brain

Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells

Human skin cells reprogrammed directly into brain cells

Scientists have described a way to convert human skin cells directly into a specific type of brain cell affected by Huntington's disease, an ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Unlike other techniques that turn one cell type into another, this new process does not pass through a stem cell phase, avoiding the production of multiple cell types, the study's authors report.

If you're over 60, drink up: Alcohol associated with better memory

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, University of Kentucky, and University of Maryland found that for people 60 and older who do not have dementia, light alcohol consumption during late life is associated with higher episodic memory — the ability to recall memories of events.

Bipolar disorder discovery at the nano level

CHICAGO --- A nano-sized discovery by Northwestern Medicine® scientists helps explain how bipolar disorder affects the brain and could one day lead to new drug therapies to treat the mental illness.

Baby cries show evidence of cocaine exposure during pregnancy

A new study conducted by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers provides the first known evidence of how a similar acoustic characteristic in the cry sounds of human infants and rat pups may be used to detect the harmful effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on nervous system development.

Mathematical model shows how the brain remains stable during learning

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to an international team of scientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan, UC San Francisco (UCSF), and Columbia University in New York.

Brain simulation raises questions

What does it mean to simulate the human brain? Why is it important to do so? And is it even possible to simulate the brain separately from the body it exists in? These questions are discussed in a new paper published in the scientific journal Neuron today.

Researchers record sight neurons in jumping spider brain

ITHACA, N.Y. – For the first time, a team of interdisciplinary researchers have made recordings of neurons associated with visual perception inside the poppy seed-sized brain of a jumping spider (Phidippus audax).

Video: http://www.cornell.edu/video/vision-in-jumping-spiders/s252/e552

Unsteady on your feet? Little touches could make all the difference

When a toddler takes their first steps we observe an uncertain sway in their walking. Being unsteady on our feet is something we can experience throughout life – and a new study has shown how even the lightest fingertip touch can help people to maintain their balance.

The research, led by the University of Birmingham, explains how neural and mechanical mechanisms synchronize our sway with another person.

Clot dissolver tPA's tardy twin could aid in stroke recovery

Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have identified a protein released by neurons while the brain is recovering from a stroke.

The results are scheduled for publication Oct. 21 in Journal of Neuroscience.

The protein, called urokinase-type plasminogen activator or uPA, has been approved by the FDA to dissolve blood clots in the lungs. It has been tested in clinical trials in some countries as a treatment for acute stroke.

Bogus recycling bins help identify drinking patterns among low-income seniors

  • Substance abuse is the fastest growing health concern for older adults.

  • New findings show that drinking levels are high enough to be concerning and tend to spike around the times older adults receive their social security checks.
  • These results may have prevention implications for social workers working with low-income seniors.