Brain

New theory explains how beta waves arise in the brain

New theory explains how beta waves arise in the brain

Beta rhythms, or waves of brain activity with an approximately 20 Hz frequency, accompany vital fundamental behaviors such as attention, sensation and motion and are associated with some disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Scientists have debated how the spontaneous waves emerge, and they have not yet determined whether the waves are just a byproduct of activity, or play a causal role in brain functions. Now in a new paper led by Brown University neuroscientists, they have a specific new mechanistic explanation of beta waves to consider.

Among the oldest adults, poor balance may signal higher risk for dementia

Among the oldest adults, poor balance may signal higher risk for dementia

The number of people living well into their 90s is projected to quadruple by 2050. By mid-century, nearly 9 million people will be 90-years-old or older. In a first-of-its-kind study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers from the University of California at Irvine examined whether four different measures of poor physical performance might be linked to increased dementia risk for people aged 90 and older.

Changes in teenage brain structure provide clues to onset of mental health problems

Scientists have mapped the structural changes that occur in teenagers' brains as they develop, showing how these changes may help explain why the first signs of mental health problems often arise during late adolescence.

In a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from the University of Cambridge and University College London (UCL) used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study the brain structure of almost 300 individuals aged 14-24 years old.

Network physicist sheds light on Alzheimer's, schizophrenia

Researchers comparing mouse and macaque brains have found evidence of an evolutionary universal brain structure in mammals that enables comparisons of cortical networks between species. A new study from a researcher at the University of Notre Dame could provide insights into brain disorders such as Alzheimer's and schizophrenia.

Hearing test may identify autism risk

Researchers have identified an inner ear deficiency in children with Autism that may impact their ability to recognize speech. The findings, which were published in the journal Autism Research, could ultimately be used as a way to identify children at risk for the disorder at an early age.

Study finds average 6-year delay between onset and diagnosis of bipolar disorder

Crucial opportunities to manage bipolar disorder early are being lost because individuals are waiting an average of almost six years after the onset of the condition before diagnosis and treatment.

That is the key finding of a joint UNSW Australia and Italian study published today in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry.

Using tau imaging as diagnostic marker for Alzheimer disease

The accumulation of β-Amyloid (Αβ) and tau proteins in the brain is hallmark pathology for Alzheimer disease. Recently developed positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, including [18F]-AV-1451, bind to tau in neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. So, could tau imaging become a diagnostic marker for Alzheimer disease and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the neurodegenerative disorder that destroys brain cells?

Developmental differences in late preterm babies may not emerge until after age 2

ANN ARBOR, Mich. - Developmental differences in babies born 4 to 6 weeks early may not show up until after they turn two, a new study suggests.

Researchers from C.S. Mott Children's Hospital at the University of Michigan tracked children from infancy through kindergarten and compared developmental outcomes between late preterm infants (born between 34 and 36 weeks); those born early term (37 to 38 weeks) and term (39 to 41 weeks).

Tel Aviv University research opens the 'black box' of malignant melanoma

When malignant melanoma metastasizes to the brain, it is a death sentence for most patients. Metastatic melanoma is the deadliest of the skin cancers and the mechanisms that govern early metastatic growth and interactions of metastatic cells with the brain microenvironment remain shrouded in mystery.

Pain of rejection makes us more likely to commit fraud

People commit fraud because they are unhappy about being rejected, a new study in Frontiers in Psychology has found.

Many of us might not professional criminals, however when an insurance company rejects our claims, we are more likely to inflate the claims.