Brain

Novel compound halts cocaine addiction and relapse behaviors

Novel compound halts cocaine addiction and relapse behaviors

BUFFALO, N.Y. – A novel compound that targets an important brain receptor has a dramatic effect against a host of cocaine addiction behaviors, including relapse behavior, a University at Buffalo animal study has found.

The research provides strong evidence that this may be a novel lead compound for treating cocaine addiction, for which no effective medications exist.

The UB research was published as an online preview article in Neuropsychopharmacology last week.

Too many chefs: Smaller groups exhibit more accurate decision-making

Too many chefs: Smaller groups exhibit more accurate decision-making

The trope that the likelihood of an accurate group decision increases with the abundance of brains involved might not hold up when a collective faces a variety of factors — as often happens in life and nature. Instead, Princeton University researchers report that smaller groups actually tend to make more accurate decisions while larger assemblies may become excessively focused on only certain pieces of information.

Physical activity keeps hippocampus healthy in people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Physical activity keeps hippocampus healthy in people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Atorvastatin protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

Atorvastatin protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

Functional electrical stimulation improves neuronal regeneration after cerebral infarction

Functional electrical stimulation improves neuronal regeneration after cerebral infarction

Study finds long-term survival of human neural stem cells transplanted into primate brain

Putnam Valley, NY. (Apr. 23 2014) – A team of researchers in Korea who transplanted human neural stem cells (hNSCs) into the brains of nonhuman primates and assessed cell survival and differentiation after 22 and 24 months found that the hNSCs had differentiated into neurons at 24 months and did not cause tumors.

Autologous stem cell therapy improves motor function in chronic stroke victims

A key to enjoying massive online photo files may be giving up some control

PITTSBURGH—The ability of individuals to store and instantly access thousands of their photos online has become a commonplace luxury, but the sheer size of these archives can be intimidating. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Microsoft Research Cambridge, UK, have found people might actually enjoy their collections more by giving up a bit of control and learning to wait.

Airport security-style technology could help doctors decide on stroke treatment

A new computer program could help doctors predict which patients might suffer potentially fatal side-effects from a key stroke treatment.

The program, which assesses brain scans using pattern recognition software similar to that used in airport security and passport control, has been developed by researchers at Imperial College London. Results of a pilot study funded by the Wellcome Trust, which used the software are published in the journal Neuroimage Clinical.

ADHD drug may help preserve our self-control resources

Methylphenidate, also known as Ritalin, may prevent the depletion of self-control, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Self-control can be difficult — sticking with a diet or trying to focus attention on a boring textbook are hard things to do. Considerable research suggests one potential explanation for this difficulty: Exerting self-control for a long period seems to "deplete" our ability to exert self-control effectively on subsequent tasks.