Culture

Groups in tension: Why Republicans and Democrats still get along

It happens after every presidential election. The opposition will be the death of America, friendships are lost, society is doomed. Except it isn't. 

In actuality, proclamations of doom by political activists and those they whip into a frenzy never come to pass, because at heart all Americans share common moral values such as fairness and harm. And that is also why some on both sides are so afraid of new ideas. At least if we can go by social psychologists doing interviews. 

People remain fatter because adults have given up on losing weight - and it's society's fault

A study of 27,350 adults drawn from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) finds that adults are not trying to lose weight. 

Part of that is cultural. We said women and men in media who were thin were sending an unrealistic body image to everyone else, it was "fat shaming" and they are probably anorexic anyway.

We enabled obesity and it worked. 

Do school voucher programs increase test scores enough?

An analysis of 25 years of school voucher program results finds that voucher programs do not significantly improve test scores, and worse, that vouchers distract from proven policies and programs with more proven impact on test scores and graduation rates.

Media blamed for loss of Dutch Brazil

Few people today know that from 1630 to 1654 Brazil was a Dutch colony, the presence of the Portuguese language and Latin culture leads most to assume the rainbow of indigenous peoples became part of Portugal after the Treaty of Tordesillas in 1494 made it possible for them to keep their coastal settlements created after Pedro Álvares Cabral began exploring in 1500.

A Science March Won't Fix Science In A Post-Truth World

A Science March Won't Fix Science In A Post-Truth World

Before Brexit and the US elections, Nature magazine columnist Colin Macilwain set out a challenge: “If Donald Trump were to trigger a crisis in Western democracy, scientists would need to look at their part in its downfall.”

Now that he has become president, the possibility of crisis is real, including the spectre of a “Twitter ban” for scientists. So what of scientific introspection?

We have a vaccine for six cancers, but anti-science and anti-business beliefs prevent uptake

We have a vaccine for six cancers, but anti-science and anti-business beliefs prevent uptake

Early in our careers, few of us imagined a vaccine could one day prevent cancer. Now there is a vaccine that keeps the risk of developing six Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers at bay, but adoption of it has been slow and surprising low.

Get action by framing climate change studies as a sex issue

A paper published today finds that very little research into how males and females respond differently to climate change has been carried out, and that could be a real goldmine for advocates of policy changes. 

Kosher food, illegal immigrants and low birth weight

An analysis after the arrest of nearly 400 illegal immigrant workers at a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa has led scholars to link immigration raid worry to low-birth weight babies. The Postville raid of 2008 was, at the time, the largest single-site federal immigration raid in US history.

Millennials, you are being too hard on yourselves. Write a nice note

Millennials need less stress, and a little more time for themselves, in contrast to prior generations who attended college. 

Biased testing, or are girls really better at reading than boys?

Biased testing, or are girls really better at reading than boys?

 ShutterstockIn reading tests, young girls tend to be ahead of young boys in all countries, but by young adulthood there is no longer any difference between skills.