Culture

Adolescent exposure to drugs, alcohol fuels use in adulthood

Adolescent exposure to drugs, alcohol fuels use in adulthood

EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Teenagers who have easy access to drugs and alcohol in the home are more likely to drink and do drugs in their early and late 20s. That's according to the one of the first studies to look at how adolescent exposure to illegal substances affects patterns of abuse in adulthood.

The national study, by Michigan State University's Cliff Broman, also indicates that the effects were more significant among white people and males.

Should crime victims call the police?

Should crime victims call the police?

As law enforcement agencies, community organizations, and public health officials work to develop effective crime-prevention strategies, new research from the University of Iowa finds that individuals who report being victims of crime to police are less likely to become future victims of crime than those who do not report their initial experiences.

Street Norco looks like the real thing but really, really isn't

Street Norco looks like the real thing but really, really isn't

WASHINGTON --A paper published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine warns that a new street drug combining fentanyl and a novel synthetic opioid is being marketed illicitly as Norco but is much stronger and much more dangerous ("Fentanyl and a Novel Synthetic Opioid U-47700 Masquerading as Street 'Norco' in Central California: A Case Report").

Research reveals restorative justice reduces recidivism

Research reveals restorative justice reduces recidivism

HUNTSVILLE, TX (7/28/16) -- Restorative justice programs, such victim-offender mediation and community impact panels, are more effective in reducing recidivism rates among juvenile offenders than traditional court processing, a study by researchers at Sam Houston State University found.

Discovery of biomarkers for the prognosis of chronic kidney disease

Discovery of biomarkers for the prognosis of chronic kidney disease

Currently, there is no effective method to predict the prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Tomonori Kimura and Yoshitaka Isaka, researchers in Department of Nephrology, Osaka University, found that measuring D-amino acids[1], which present only trace in human, provides prognostic information of CKD. The present discovery would facilitate CKD treatment and thus improve the prognosis of CKD, and may also lead to the further discovery of novel therapy.

The impact of private sector contracts on NHS provision and treatment inequalities

Patient choice and the use of the private sector for hip surgery in Scotland was found to be associated with a decrease in NHS provision and may have contributed to an increase in age-related and socio-economic treatment inequalities, according to research by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

The study, published in the Journal of Public Health by Oxford University Press, is the first to look at the impact of diverting NHS funds to the private sector on NHS provision.

Psychiatry on closed and open wards: The suicide risk remains the same

In psychiatric clinics with an exclusively open-door policy, the risk of patients committing suicide or absconding from treatment is no higher than in clinics with locked wards. This has been demonstrated in a large study by the University of Basel and the University Psychiatric Clinics of Basel (UPK), in which around 350,000 cases were analyzed over a period of 15 years. The results are published in the journal The Lancet Psychiatry.

Even thinking about marriage gets young people to straighten up

COLUMBUS, Ohio - You don't have to get married to settle down and leave behind your wild ways - you just have to expect to get married soon.

Researchers found that teenagers and young adults who expected to get married within the next five years reported committing fewer delinquent acts in the next year than those who weren't thinking about wedding bells.

While other studies have shown that people commit fewer crimes when they get married, this is the first to show that people straighten up their act even before they tie the knot.

Study finds couples' division of paid and unpaid labor linked to risk of divorce

WASHINGTON, DC, July 25, 2016 -- A new study suggests that financial factors, including couples' overall resources and wives' ability to support themselves in the event of a divorce, are not predictive of whether marriages last. Rather, it is couples' division of labor -- paid and unpaid -- that is associated with the risk of divorce.

First clinical guidelines in Canada for pain following spinal cord injury

LONDON, ONTATIO - Researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute are the first in Canada to develop clinical practice guidelines for managing neuropathic pain with patients who have experienced a spinal cord injury (SCI).

Neuropathic pain is complex and chronic, and is the most common complication reported by people following SCI. The research team worked with care providers at Parkwood Institute, part of the St. Joseph's Health Care London family, and an international panel to address the complex and unique challenges for managing pain during recovery and rehabilitation.