Tech

Berkeley Lab study reveals molecular structure of water at gold electrodes

Berkeley Lab study reveals molecular structure of water at gold electrodes

When a solid material is immersed in a liquid, the liquid immediately next to its surface differs from that of the bulk liquid at the molecular level. This interfacial layer is critical to our understanding of a diverse set of phenomena from biology to materials science. When the solid surface is charged, just like an electrode in a working battery, it can drive further changes in the interfacial liquid. However, elucidating the molecular structure at the solid-liquid interface under these conditions has proven difficult.

Study: Many in US have poor nutrition, with the disabled doing worst

Study: Many in US have poor nutrition, with the disabled doing worst

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — A new study finds that most U.S. adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average.

Waste, an alternative source of energy to petroleum

Waste, an alternative source of energy to petroleum

Martín Olazar, a UPV/EHU chemical engineer, has designed a fundamental process for producing alternatives to petroleum in sustainable refineries. As Olazar himself pointed out, one of the unavoidable conditions of the process is not to harm the environment. This researcher has developed a reactor based on conical spouted beds which, by means of flash or rapid pyrolysis, produces fuels and raw materials using various types of waste.

New feather findings get scientists in a flap

New feather findings get scientists in a flap

Scientists from the University of Southampton have revealed that feather shafts are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material, much like carbon fibre, which allows the feather to bend and twist to cope with the stresses of flight.

Since their appearance over 150 million years ago, feather shafts (rachises) have evolved to be some of the lightest, strongest and most fatigue resistant natural structures. However, relatively little work has been done on their morphology, especially from a mechanical perspective and never at the nanoscale.

Three-dimensional metamaterials with a natural bent

Global boom in hydropower expected this decade

Helping sweet cherries survive the long haul

Herbal medicines could contain dangerous levels of toxic mold

Amsterdam, October 23, 2014 - Herbal medicines such as licorice, Indian rennet and opium poppy, are at risk of contamination with toxic mould, according to a new study published in Fungal Biology. The authors of the study, from the University of Peshawar, Pakistan say it's time for regulators to control mould contamination.

No-till agriculture may not bring hoped-for boost in global crop yields, study finds

No-till farming, a key conservation agriculture strategy that avoids conventional plowing and otherwise disturbing the soil, may not bring a hoped-for boost in crop yields in much of the world, according to an extensive new meta-analysis by an international team led by the University of California, Davis.

Turning waste from whisky into fuel - is it commercial reality yet?

A start-up company in Scotland is working to capitalize on the tons of waste produced by one of the country's most valued industries and turn the dregs of whisky-making into fuel. Celtic Renewables, formed in 2011, has refined its process based on a century-old fermentation technique and is now taking the next step toward a commercial plant, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN).