Earth

This week from AGU: Measuring Antarctic ice loss, Indian Ocean program, Oregon landslides

This week from AGU: Measuring Antarctic ice loss, Indian Ocean program, Oregon landslides

This week from AGU: Measuring Antarctic ice loss, Indian Ocean program, Oregon landslides

  • From AGU's blogs: Scientists use fiber-optic cables to measure ice loss in Antarctic

  • Unexpected new mechanism reveals how molecules become trapped in ice

    Unexpected new mechanism reveals how molecules become trapped in ice

    WASHINGTON D.C., Sept. 30, 2014 – Ice is ubiquitous in nature—found within terrestrial and astrophysical environments alike—and contains many atoms and molecules trapped inside it. For example, ice beneath the world's oceans hosts a vast reservoir of greenhouse gases, which if released would have a profound effect on climate change.

    New material steals oxygen from the air

    New material steals oxygen from the air

    Researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have synthesized crystalline materials that can bind and store oxygen in high concentrations. Just one spoon of the substance is enough to absorb all the oxygen in a room. The stored oxygen can be released again when and where it is needed.

    NASA ocean data shows 'climate dance' of plankton

    NASA ocean data shows 'climate dance' of plankton

    The greens and blues of the ocean color from NASA satellite data have provided new insights into how climate and ecosystem processes affect the growth cycles of phytoplankton—microscopic aquatic plants important for fish populations and Earth's carbon cycle.

    Deceptive-looking vortex line in superfluid led to twice-mistaken identity

    Deceptive-looking vortex line in superfluid led to twice-mistaken identity

    So long, solitons: University of Chicago physicists have shown that a group of scientists were incorrect when they concluded that a mysterious effect found in superfluids indicated the presence of solitons—exotic, solitary waves. Instead, they explain, the result was due to more pedestrian, whirlpool-like structures in the fluid. They published their explanation in the Sept. 19 issue of Physical Review Letters.

    Chinese scientists unveil liquid phase 3-D printing method using low melting metal alloy ink

    Chinese scientists unveil liquid phase 3-D printing method using low melting metal alloy ink

    Three-dimensional metal printing technology is an expanding field that has enormous potential applications in areas ranging from supporting structures, functional electronics to medical devices. Conventional 3D metal printing is generally restricted to metals with a high melting point, and the process is rather time consuming.

    Grouse moor burning causes widespread environmental changes

    Evidence of the environmental effects of moorland burning is published today in the first authoritative scientific study on the subject, with the aim of relieving tensions on both sides of the grouse moor management debate.

    The EMBER (Effects of Moorland Burning on the Ecohydrology of River basins) project has shown that heather burning on moorland, which is practised predominantly to support red grouse populations for gun sports, has significant negative impacts on peat hydrology, peat chemistry and physical properties, river water chemistry and river ecology.

    The cultural side of science communication

    EVANSTON, Ill. --- Do we think of nature as something that we enjoy when we visit a national park and something we need to "preserve?" Or do we think of ourselves as a part of nature? A bird's nest is a part of nature, but what about a house?

    The answers to these questions reflect different cultural orientations. They are also reflected in our actions, our speech and in cultural artifacts.

    Bacteria may have ability to reduce impact of diazepam on UK river environments

    The natural photo degradation of diazepam (valium) and similar medicines – followed by bacterial breakdown – may reduce their potentially harmful impact on the UK's freshwater environment, a team of researchers has said.

    Entanglement made tangible