Earth

Manipulating water using light

A desire to find new ways of separating oil from water, such as to treat the frothy mixture of briny water and crude oil produced from certain oil wells, has led to ways to manipulate the water using only light.

You can't trust EWG about pesticides on fruits and vegetables

You can't trust EWG about pesticides on fruits and vegetables

Spring is just around the corner, and with it comes another growing season. Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables can help lower calorie intake; reduce risks for heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes; and protect against certain cancers.

Neonicotinoids detected in Iowa drinking water

Neonicotinoids, a targeted (as opposed to broadly sprayed) insecticide common in agriculture, have been detected in drinking water. Since in modern times we can even detect parts per quadrillion in drinking water, is the health of Iowans at risk?

How accurate are wildlife surveys?

How accurate are wildlife surveys?

Do you know species are going extinct at an alarming rate? Do you know bees are in peril?

What if you found out those are all based on surveys? As we saw in the US election in 2016, surveys are not science, no matter how much groups claim they weight them. Unless the results are easily predictable (like the 2012 election) there is no way statistical significance will mean an accurate result.

Extreme ocean waves aren't due to global warming - we can just now detect them more

Extreme ocean waves aren't due to global warming - we can just now detect them more

Rogue waves can cause loss of life as well as damage to ships and offshore structures but we shouldn't allow nature to be exploited for political gain by claiming they are new - and caused by CO2 emissions - just because we can finally detect them better. 

A new study shows they can occur roughly twice daily at any given location in a storm.

Stop kiln yourself: make ceramics with a press

Stop kiln yourself: make ceramics with a press

The manufacture of cement, bricks, bathroom tiles and porcelain crockery normally requires a great deal of heat: a kiln is used to fire the ceramic materials at temperatures well in excess of 1,000°C. Now, material scientists from ETH Zurich have developed what seems at first glance to be an astonishingly simple method of manufacture that works at room temperature. The scientists used a calcium carbonate nanopowder as the starting material and instead of firing it, they added a small amount of water and then compacted it.

Consumption vortex and the terrifying mathematics of the Anthropocene

Consumption vortex and the terrifying mathematics of the Anthropocene

Here are some surprising facts about humans’ effect on planet Earth. We have made enough concrete to create an exact replica of Earth 2mm thick. We have produced enough plastic to wrap Earth in clingfilm. We are creating “technofossils”, a new term for congealed human-made materials – plastics and concretes – that will be around for tens of millions of years.

Journey to the center of the core of the Earth

Journey to the center of the core of the Earth

About 85 percent of the Earth's core is made of iron, while nickel makes up an additional 10 percent. What is the final 5 percent? A variety of of light elements, it's been assumed, but no one knows.

The core, which is the deepest region of the Earth, is composed of a liquid outer core (2900~5100 km in depth) and solid inner core (5100~6400 km in depth). The core is one of the most important "final frontiers" for scientists looking to understand the history of Earth, and the conditions during its formation 4.5 billion years ago.

Good news: Animal species in today's oceans most diverse ever

One of the most frustrating claims by people raising money promoting an environmental apocalypse has been that species are about to go extinct or diversity will be lost. It leads to rampant distrust in science because advocates know if their side is spinning facts to suit an agenda, the science side might be too.

There are thriving wildlife populations in Chernobyl

There are thriving wildlife populations in Chernobyl

A team of international researchers, including James Beasley, assistant professor of wildlife ecology at the University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and the Warnell School Forestry and Natural Resources, has discovered abundant populations of wildlife at Chernobyl, the site of the 1986 nuclear accident that released radioactive particles into the environment and forced a massive evacuation of the human population.