Earth

ATLANTA -- Mexican-Americans living in the United States demonstrated more risk factors for liver cancer than their counterparts in Mexico, according to results of a study presented at the 10th AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities in Racial/Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved, held here Sept. 25-28.

Researchers have observed and characterized a weather process that was not previously known to occur in Antarctica's coastal regions. It turns out that the katabatic winds that blow from the interior to the margins of the continent reduce the amount of precipitation (mainly snowfall) -- which is a key factor in the formation of the ice cap. By forming a very dry layer of air in the first kilometer or so of atmosphere, the winds turn the falling snowflakes during their fall directly from their solid state into water vapor in a process known as sublimation.

Freshwater planarians, found around the world and commonly known as "flatworms," are famous for their regenerative prowess. Through a process called "fission," planarians can reproduce asexually by simply tearing themselves into two pieces -- a head and a tail -- which then go on to form two new worms within about a week.

Tropical Storm Pilar formed near the southwestern coast of Mexico on Saturday, Sept. 23 and continued hugging the coast when NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites passed overhead. Pilar weakened to a tropical depression during the late morning on Sept. 25.

Former Tropical Storm Lee was almost forgotten when Hurricanes Irma, Jose and Maria struck the U.S. because it weakened to a remnant low pressure area and lingered quietly in the Central Atlantic. On Friday, Sept. 22, however, it consolidated, organized and was reborn as a tropical storm. As Lee strengthened into a small "zombie" hurricane, NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites analyzed the newest Atlantic Ocean hurricane.

Hurricane Maria was analyzed in visible and infrared light as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP passed overhead over two days. NASA's GPM satellite also provided a look at Maria's rainfall rates.

LAWRENCE -- Minority public managers place more emphasis on both traditional values, like efficiency and effectiveness, and social equity when compared with their white counterparts, according to a new study that includes a University of Kansas researcher and two fellow KU alumni.

"Race does make a difference in how we talk about public values at the local government level, and we need more research on what that means," said Shannon Portillo, associate professor in the KU School of Public Affairs & Administration.

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass. (Sept. 25, 2017) -- The brain plays an active and essential role much earlier than previously thought, according to new research from Tufts University scientists which shows that long before movement or other behaviors occur, the brain of an embryonic frog influences muscle and nerve development and protects the embryo from agents that cause developmental defects. Remarkably, the brain performs these functions while it is itself still developing, marking the earliest known events of the brain-body interface.

A completely new group of sponges has been discovered, which scientists believe could be a key indicator species in measuring future mining impact in a region targeted for deep-sea mining of polymetallic (metal-rich) nodules. They are likely to be the most abundant nodule-dwelling animal in the area.

Scientists from the University of Exeter studied how guppies behaved in various situations, and found complex differences between individuals.

The researchers tested whether differences could be measured on a "simple spectrum" of how risk-averse or risk-prone guppies were. But they found variations between individuals were too complicated to be described in this way.