Earth

Earth's mantle appears to have a driving role in plate tectonics

Earth's mantle appears to have a driving role in plate tectonics

EUGENE, Ore. -- July 28, 2016 -- Deep down below us is a tug of war moving at less than the speed of growing fingernails. Keeping your balance is not a concern, but how the movement happens has been debated among geologists.

New findings from under the Pacific Northwest Coast by University of Oregon and University of Washington scientists now suggest a solution to a mystery that surfaced when the theory of plate tectonics arose: Do the plates move the mantle, or does the mantle move the plates.

Transformations to granular zircon revealed: Meteor Crater, Arizona

Transformations to granular zircon revealed: Meteor Crater, Arizona

Boulder, Colo., USA - Having been reported in lunar samples returned by Apollo astronauts, meteorites, impact glass, and at a number of meteorite craters on Earth, granular zircon is the most unusual and enigmatic type of zircon known. The mechanisms and transformations that form this distinctive granular zircon have, until now, remained speculative because it has not been produced in shock experiments.

Satellite tracks the remnants of Tropical Storm Georgette

Satellite tracks the remnants of Tropical Storm Georgette

Tropical Storm Georgette faded fast in the Eastern Pacific and NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an image of the remnant clouds.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured a visible light image of the remnant clouds associated with former Tropical Storm Celia at 1715 UTC (1:15 p.m. EDT). The National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued their final advisory on the storm at 11 a.m. EDT when they noted that Georgette had become a remnant low pressure area.

New material could advance superconductivity

New material could advance superconductivity

Washington, D.C.--Scientists have looked for different ways to force hydrogen into a metallic state for decades. A metallic state of hydrogen is a holy grail for materials science because it could be used for superconductors, materials that have no resistance to the flow of electrons, which increases electricity transfer efficiency many times over.

CO2 can be stored underground for 10 times the length needed to avoid climatic impact

CO2 can be stored underground for 10 times the length needed to avoid climatic impact

Study of natural-occurring 100,000 year-old CO2 reservoirs shows no significant corroding of 'cap rock', suggesting the greenhouse gas hasn't leaked back out - one of the main concerns with greenhouse gas reduction proposal of carbon capture and storage.

New research shows that natural accumulations of carbon dioxide (CO2) that have been trapped underground for around 100,000 years have not significantly corroded the rocks above, suggesting that storing CO2 in reservoirs deep underground is much safer and more predictable over long periods of time than previously thought.

In France, hiring biases slightly favor women in male-dominated STEM fields

Women enjoy a slight advantage over men when applying to become science teachers in France, a new study suggests. The results contrast with notions of a hiring bias against women in certain STEM fields, and may have implications for the debate over which interventions to pursue to increase the representation of women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Discrimination against women during the hiring process is seen as one of the possible causes of their underrepresentation in fields including mathematics, physics and chemistry.

Production area does not affect phosphorus digestibility in soybean meal fed to pigs

  • The chemical composition of soybean meal can be dependent on the area in which soybeans are grown.

  • Soybean meal from three different growing areas in the U.S. showed no statistical differences in concentrations of phosphorus.
  • An average value for apparent and standardized total tract digestibility may be used, regardless of the area in which soybeans are grown.

Dandelions could be a sustainable source of rubber

While most farmers are actively trying to kill weeds, researchers in Ohio are trying to grow them - fast. Taraxacum kok-saghyz, a special variety of dandelion from Kazakhstan -- nicknamed "Buckeye Gold" by the researchers studying it -- may be the answer to sustainable and U.S.-based rubber-making. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, examines the plants' potential for revolutionizing the rubber industry.

Scientists change properties of zeolites to improve hemodialysis

Scientists of Tomsk State University are working on changing physicochemical properties of zeolites using thermal and mechanical treatment. Based on the results of this research the scientists will be able to create a new material for a portable device for hemodialysis.

The scientists examined synthetic zeolite powder manufactured by SAPO-34 and natural zeolite of Tokay deposits (Hungary)

Cod and climate

In recent decades, the plight of Atlantic cod off the coast of New England has been front-page news. Since the 1980s in particular, the once-seemingly inexhaustible stocks of Gadus morhua -- one of the most important fisheries in North America -- have declined dramatically.