Body

Vigorous physical activity, either in leisure time or in work, may be linked to a heightened risk of developing motor neurone disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS for short, suggests research published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

The "new class 1 evidence" prompts the researchers to speculate whether ALS might be a trade-off for the many well known benefits of physical exercise on other aspects of health.

Six in seven women with a family history of breast cancer opt out of taking tamoxifen as a preventative measure, according to a study funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment today (Tuesday)*.

Researchers asked 258 healthy women across England who had been identified as having an increased risk of the disease whether they had agreed to take the drug to help prevent breast cancer developing, and interviewed 16 women to identify what influenced their decision to take it.

PHILADELPHIA - Teens who admit to texting while driving may be convinced to reduce risky cellphone use behind the wheel when presented with financial incentives such as auto-insurance apps that monitor driving behavior, according to a new survey conducted by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).

CHAPEL HILL - Cancer that has spread, or metastasized, from its original site to other tissues and organs in the body is a leading cause of cancer death. Unfortunately, research focused on metastatic disease has been limited by a lack of experimental systems that mimic the way metastatic cancers grow in people.

A growing body of evidence indicates that rates of dementia may be declining, in part because older adults' cognitive abilities, such as learning and memory functions, are better than those of older adults in the past. But most data have come from almost entirely white cohorts living in high-income countries, calling into question the universality of the trend.

Now, a study of a majority-black cohort, led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher, finds no clear upward trend in cognitive abilities among older adults.

Making tiny changes to existing diabetes treatments can alter how they interact with cells, and potentially make the medicines more effective.

The findings come from early-stage studies in both human cells and mice in which researchers tweaked the structure of an existing treatment for type 2 diabetes.

This tweak enabled the researchers, from Imperial College London, to hack into the 'traffic system' that shuttles drugs in and out of cells. This increased the effectiveness of the drug, and led to more insulin being released.

Of the more than 38 million Americans who experience migraine headaches, 28 million are women. Compared to men, women also experience more frequent and severe migraines and don't respond as well to drug treatments. Findings from a new study conducted in rats reveal that females may be more susceptible to migraines and less responsive to treatment because of the way fluctuations in the hormone estrogen affect cells in the brain.

Researchers have developed a vaccine for one of the most dangerous types of synthetic cathinones, or bath salts. The vaccine blunts the illegal stimulant's effects on the brain, which could help recovering drug users who experience a relapse.

Increased awareness of the importance of the microbes that live in our gut has spurred a great deal of research on the microbiome and fueled a booming probiotics industry. A new study suggests probiotics can improve not only the health of our gut but liver health, as well.

Madrid, Spain: Researchers identified novel chromosomal mutations and described their role in the development of resistance of Escherichia coli (E. coli) to broad-spectrum antibiotic fosfomycin, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) [1].