Body

Hospital data helps predict risk of pneumonia after heart surgery

Hospital data helps predict risk of pneumonia after heart surgery

Pneumonia is the most prevalent infection after open-heart surgery, leading to longer hospital stays and lower odds of survival.

But a new analysis of data from thousands of patients who had coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery at Michigan hospitals revealed ways people can prepare their bodies to reduce the risk of postoperative pneumonia -- a complication that occurred in 3.3 percent of patients in the observational review.

Protein insights to help find heart disease cure

Protein insights to help find heart disease cure

Research led by The Australian National University (ANU) has uncovered new insights into how the human genome gets through the daily grind with the help of RNA-binding proteins, in a discovery which could ultimately lead to a cure for heart disease.

Lead researcher Professor Thomas Preiss from The John Curtin School of Medical Research at ANU said the finding opens new avenues of research into RNAs - short-lived copies of the genetic information stored in DNA.

Real-time imaging of fish gut ties bacterial competition to gut movements

Real-time imaging of fish gut ties bacterial competition to gut movements

In recent years, numerous diseases have been tied to variations in gut microbiota. The rapidly growing probiotics industry targets gut and intestinal health by developing products built mostly around enzyme cultures and bacteria. But a new study now suggests that the underlying health and physical forces of the gut are as important as the bacteria inside in shaping communities of intestinal microbiota, and offers insights into the problems experienced by humans with a birth defect called Hirschsprung's disease.

Effectiveness of the WHO cancer pain relief guidelines published by Dove Medical Press

The Journal of Pain Research has published the review "Effectiveness of the World Health Organization Cancer Pain Relief Guidelines: An Integrative Review".

New genetics clues into motor neuron disease

Researchers at The University of Queensland have contributed to the discovery of three new genes which increase the risk of motor neuron disease (MND), opening the door for targeted treatments.

Professor Naomi Wray from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute was involved in the data analysis as a part of an international study of more than 30,000 people.

"These three new genes open new opportunities for research to understand a complex and debilitating disease which currently has no effective treatments," Professor Wray said.

Exercise cuts gestational diabetes in obese pregnant women

Exercise alone can reduce the number of obese, pregnant women who develop gestational diabetes, a new study from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) has shown.

Women in the exercise group also had lower blood pressure than the control group towards the end of their pregnancy.

The study has just been published in PLOS Medicine.

Cells from same cell bank lots may have vast genetic variability

In a surprise finding, researchers working with breast cancer cells purchased at the same time from the same cell bank discovered that the cells responded differently to chemicals, even though the researchers had not detected any difference when they tested them for authenticity at the time of purchase.

Evidence insufficient to make recommendation regarding visual skin examination by a clinician

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of visual skin examination by a clinician to screen for skin cancer in asymptomatic adults. The report appears in the July 26 issue of JAMA.

This is an I statement, indicating that that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of the service. Evidence is lacking, of poor quality, or conflicting, and the balance of benefits and harms cannot be determined.

Task force maybe too stringent in not yet recommending melanoma screening

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force announced today that it doesn't have enough evidence to recommend that clinicians perform visual screening for melanomas with patients with no known special risk for the skin cancer. In an invited commentary in JAMA -- the journal of the American Medical Association -- Drs. Martin Weinstock and Hensin Tsao agree that the evidence doesn't meet the task force's standards, but they also question whether those standards are appropriate.

Trends in late preterm, early term birth rates and association with clinician-initiated obstetric interventions

Between 2006 and 2014, late preterm and early term birth rates decreased in the United States and an association was observed between early term birth rates and decreasing clinician-initiated obstetric interventions, according to a study appearing in the July 26 issue of JAMA.