Citizen scientists have positive news for Puget Sound seabirds

Citizen scientists have positive news for Puget Sound seabirds

A new analysis of seven years of bird sightings by citizen scientist birdwatchers from the Seattle Audubon Society has found positive trends in several Puget Sound seabird species that had been in historic decline. The study tracked the occurrence of 18 seabird species at 62 sites around Puget Sound and found increased presence of 14 species, including cormorants, loons, rhinoceros auklets, and harlequin ducks. It also documented local hotspots for certain species, which may reflect especially important habitat or prey the birds depend on.

Sociologists discover young women and men prefer egalitarian relationships

The majority of young women and men today would prefer an egalitarian relationship in which work and family responsibilities are shared equally between partners if that possibility were available to them, according to a new study from the University of Texas at Austin and the University of California-Santa Barbara.

The paper in the American Sociological Review was co-authored by David S. Pedulla, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin, and Sarah Thébaud, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of California-Santa Barbara.

Sleeping on stomach increases risk of sudden death in epilepsy

New research shows that stomach sleepers with epilepsy may be at higher risk of sudden unexpected death, drawing parallels to sudden infant death syndrome in babies. The study is published in the January 21, 2015, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes repeated seizures and affects an estimated 50 million people worldwide.

BPA exposure during pregnancy correlated to oxidative stress in child, mother

Exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy can cause oxidative damage that may put the baby at risk of developing diabetes or heart disease later in life, according to a new paper.

Bisphenol A is a chemical used to manufacture plastics and epoxy resins. BPA is found in a variety of consumer products, including plastic bottles, food cans and cash register receipts.

Ventricular assist devices induce heart muscle regeneration

Prolonged use of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) by patients with heart failure may induce regeneration of heart muscle by preventing oxidative damage to a cell-regulator mechanism, UT Southwestern Medical Center investigators have found.

LVADs are mechanical pumps that are sometimes implanted in patients who are awaiting heart transplants. LVADs substitute for the damaged heart by pumping blood throughout the body.

Targeting DNA repair pathways could provide better treatment for neuroblastoma in kids

Researchers have identified a promising new target for developing new therapies for kids with high-risk neuroblastoma, according to a new study.

Neuroblastoma is the most common cancer infants and the most common solid tumor outside of the brain in all children, in which malignant cancer cells form in primitive nerve tissue called "ganglions" or in the adrenal glands.

KIT gene linked to drug resistance in testicular cancer

A study has uncovered several new genetic mutations that could drive testicular cancer - and also identified a gene which may contribute to tumors becoming resistant to current treatments.

The study is the first to use state-of-the-art sequencing technology to explore in detail testicular germ cell tumors - which make up the vast majority of testicular cancers and are the most common cancers in young men. The study in Nature Communications used whole-exome sequencing to examine tumor samples from 42 patients with testicular cancer treated at the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust.

Concerns over skin whitener marketing

A marketing study has raised concerns over the ethics of the marketing of skin-whitening products widely available in Australia.

Regardless, demand for the product is growing, with more than 60 percent of Indian women reportedly using one of the more than 240 brands of skin lightener available in that country.

Professor Lynne Eagle of James Cook University says skin whiteners are also easy to find in Australia. "I brought it from two different shops in Townsville within ten minutes' drive of my office," she said.

Mortality-To-Incidence Equation Helps Identify Global Disparities in Cancer Screening and Treatment

Disparities in cancer screening, incidence, treatment, and survival are worsening globally. In a new study on colorectal cancer, researchers found that the mortality-to-incidence ratio (MIR) can help identify whether a country has a higher mortality than might be expected based on cancer incidence.

Countries with lower-than-expected MIRs have strong national health systems characterized by formal colorectal cancer screening programs. Conversely, countries with higher-than-expected MIRs are more likely to lack such screening programs.

Those dam dead zones identified in decline of endangered Missouri River pallid sturgeon

Pallid sturgeon come from a genetic line that has lived on this planet for tens of millions of years; yet it has been decades since anyone has documented any of the enormous fish successfully producing young that survive to adulthood in the upper Missouri River basin.