Functional human tissue-engineered liver generated from stem and progenitor cells

Functional human tissue-engineered liver generated from stem and progenitor cells

A research team led by investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles has generated functional human and mouse tissue-engineered liver from adult stem and progenitor cells. Tissue-engineered Liver (TELi) was found to contain normal structural components such as hepatocytes, bile ducts and blood vessels. The study has been published online in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

New species of pterosaur discovered in Patagonia

New species of pterosaur discovered in Patagonia

Scientists today announced the discovery of a new species of pterosaur from the Patagonia region of South America. The cranial remains were in an excellent state of preservation and belonged to a new species of pterosaur from the Early Jurassic. The researchers have named this new species 'Allkauren koi' from the native Tehuelche word 'all' for 'brain', and 'karuen' for 'ancient'.

Inconsistent guidelines for screening transplant recipients at higher cancer risk: Study

Inconsistent guidelines for screening transplant recipients at higher cancer risk: Study

TORONTO, Aug. 30, 2016--People who have received organ transplants are at higher risk of developing and dying of cancer than the general population. Yet a new study has found cancer screening guidelines for this group are inconsistent as is the use of these guidelines.

Study documents a lost century for forest elephants

Study documents a lost century for forest elephants

First-ever demographic study confirms forest elephants among the world's slowest reproducing mammals, spelling trouble for populations threatened by poaching Elephant populations will take nearly a century to recover from poaching since 2002 Closing domestic ivory markets will be debated at upcoming IUCN World Conservation Congress and CITES meeting Forest elephants are one of two species of African elephants

More tomatoes, faster: Accelerating tomato engineering

More tomatoes, faster: Accelerating tomato engineering

ITHACA, NY-- Tomatoes are already an ideal model species for plant research, but scientists at the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) just made them even more useful by cutting the time required to modify their genes by six weeks.

Mitosis study finds potential cancer target

Mitosis study finds potential cancer target

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- Structural biologists show in a new study that an apparently key step in the process of cell division depends on a unique interaction among specific proteins, including one that is strongly linked to cancer. Their hope now is that the detailed new characterization of the interaction will make it a target for exploring a new cancer therapy.

Bipolar adolescents continue to have elevated substance use disorder risk as young adults

A follow up to a previous study finding an association between adolescent bipolar disorder and the incidence of cigarette smoking and substance use disorder finds that risk was even greater five years later, particularly among those with persistent bipolar symptoms. The report from a team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators, published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, also finds evidence that the presence of conduct disorder, in combination with bipolar disorder, may be the strongest influence on the risk of smoking and substance use disorder.

WSU researcher finds mechanism affecting alcohol consumption

PULLMAN, Wash.--A Washington State University researcher has found a mechanism that strongly influences whether or not an animal is likely to drink a lot of alcohol.

"It takes them from drinking the equivalent of three to four units of alcohol in one to two hours, down to one to two," said David Rossi, a WSU assistant professor of neuroscience.

High seas fisheries management could recoup losses due to climate change

Closing the high seas to fishing could increase fish catches in coastal waters by 10 per cent, helping people, especially the most vulnerable, cope with the expected losses of fish due to climate change, new UBC research finds.

Systems biology research study reveals benefits of vacation and meditation

Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the University of California, San Francisco, and Harvard Medical School used a rigorous study design to assess the biological impact of meditation compared to vacation. They examined the effect of meditation on gene expression patterns in both novice and regular meditators. The researchers found that a resort vacation provides a strong and immediate impact on molecular networks associated with stress and immune pathways, in addition to short- term improvements in well-being, as measured by feelings of vitality and distress.