Activity tracker uses heart rate to personalize amount of exercise needed to prevent death

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: A novel activity tracker has been developed that uses heart rate data to personalise the amount of exercise needed to reduce the risk of death from cardiovascular disease. The science behind the tracker is presented for the first time today at ESC Congress 2016.1

Moderate physical activity linked with 50 percent reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: Moderate physical activity is associated with a greater than 50% reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.1 The 12 year study in nearly 2500 adults aged 65 to 74 years found that moderate physical activity reduced the risk of an acute cardiovascular event by more than 30%. High levels of physical activity led to greater risk reductions.

20 cent school intervention stops unhealthy weight gain in children

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: A school intervention costing less than 20 cents per child has stopped unhealthy weight gain. The randomised study is presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Ms Daniela Schneid Schuh, a nutritionist at the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil.1

"Obesity has reached a plateau in developed countries but continues to rise in many developing countries, such as Brazil," said Ms Schneid Schuh. "Thus, it is necessary to develop low-cost methods to prevent people become overweight, starting in childhood."

Low socioeconomic status associated with higher risk of second heart attack or stroke

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: Low socioeconomic status is associated with a higher risk of a second heart attack or stroke, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.1 The study in nearly 30 000 patients with a prior heart attack found that the risk of a second event was 36% lower for those in the highest income quintile compared to the lowest and increased by 14% in divorced compared to married patients.

Smartphone detects atrial fibrillation with existing hardware

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: Smartphones can be used to detect atrial fibrillation with existing hardware, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.1 A low-cost application (app) has been developed that uses the phone's own accelerometer and gyroscope to check for atrial fibrillation.

Alcohol-related hospitalization associated with doubled stroke risk in atrial fibrillation

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: Alcohol related hospitalisation is associated with a doubled risk of ischaemic stroke risk in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, according to a study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Dr Faris Al-Khalili, cardiologist, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.1 The observational study was conducted in more than 25 000 non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients at low risk of stroke.2

Direct catheter-based thrombectomy equal to bridging thrombolysis in ischemic stroke

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: Direct catheter-based thrombectomy is equally effective to bridging thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischaemic stroke, according to results from the observational PRAGUE-16 registry study presented at ESC Congress 2016 today.1

ESC and EACTS launch first collaborative atrial fibrillation guidelines

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: The first European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines on Atrial Fibrillation developed in collaboration with the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) are published online today in European Heart Journal1 and the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, and on the ESC Website.2

ESC/EAS guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias launched today

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemias are published online today in European Heart Journal1 and on the ESC Website.2

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) kills over four million people in Europe each year. At least 80% of CVD could be prevented by eliminating health risk behaviours.

ESC launches novel paper on tackling cardiac toxicity of anticancer therapies

Rome, Italy - 27 Aug 2016: The European Society of Cardiology has launched a novel position paper, under the auspices of its Committee for Practice Guidelines, on tackling the cardiac toxicity of anticancer therapies. The cardio-oncology paper is published online today in European Heart Journal1 and on the ESC Website.2