As high-tech products increase, metals face future supply risks

As high-tech products increase, metals face future supply risks

In a new paper, a team of Yale researchers assesses the "criticality" of all 62 metals on the Periodic Table of Elements, providing key insights into which materials might become more difficult to find in the coming decades, which ones will exact the highest environmental costs -- and which ones simply cannot be replaced as components of vital technologies.

Spring plankton bloom hitches a ride on ocean eddies

Spring plankton bloom hitches a ride on ocean eddies

Just as crocus and daffodil blossoms signal the start of a warmer season on land, a similar "greening" event--a massive bloom of microscopic plants, or phytoplankton--unfolds each spring in the North Atlantic Ocean from Bermuda to the Arctic.

New lobster-like predator found in 508 million-year-old fossil-rich site

New lobster-like predator found in 508 million-year-old fossil-rich site

What do butterflies, spiders and lobsters have in common? They are all surviving relatives of a newly identified species called Yawunik kootenayi, a marine creature with two pairs of eyes and prominent grasping appendages that lived as much as 508 million years ago - more than 250 million years before the first dinosaur.

The secret lives of pandas

The secret lives of pandas

Reclusive giant pandas fascinate the world, yet precious little is known about how they spend their time in the Chinese bamboo forests. Until now.

A team of Michigan State University (MSU) researchers who have been electronically stalking five pandas in the wild, courtesy of rare GPS collars, have finished crunching months of data and has published some panda surprises in this month's Journal of Mammalogy.

First fully-implantable micropacemaker designed for fetal use

First fully-implantable micropacemaker designed for fetal use

A team of investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and the University of Southern California have developed the first fully implantable micropacemaker designed for use in a fetus with complete heart block. The team has done preclinical testing and optimization as reported in a recent issue of the journal Heart Rhythm. The micropacemaker has been designated a Humanitarian Use Device by the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA). The investigators anticipate the first human use of the device in the near future.

CRISPR-Cas9 edit technique for mosquito that transmits chikungunya yellow fever

CRISPR-Cas9 edit technique for mosquito that transmits chikungunya yellow fever

Traditionally, to understand how a gene functions, a scientist would breed an organism that lacks that gene - "knocking it out" - then ask how the organism has changed. Are its senses affected? Its behavior? Can it even survive? Thanks to the recent advance of gene editing technology, this gold standard genetic experiment has become much more accessible in a wide variety of organisms.

War on sun and dairy aftermath: More than a third of college athletes have low vitamin D

War on sun and dairy aftermath: More than a third of college athletes have low vitamin D

Up to 1 billion people globally have insufficient or deficient vitamin D levels, which was once a greater problem that it is now and the reason many western nations fortify milk with it. It used to be that the sun was used for such nourishment but with the modern war on both dairy and the sun, low vitamin D levels have become more common, even for elite college athletes, according to a new study.

But don't be duped into buying supplements, you can get it from your diet. Just eat more fish.

85 college students tried to draw the Apple logo from memory. 84 failed.

85 college students tried to draw the Apple logo from memory. 84 failed.

In a new study published in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, UCLA psychologists found that almost none of their subjects could draw the logo correctly from memory. Out of 85 UCLA undergraduate students, only one correctly reproduced the Apple logo when asked to draw it on a blank sheet of paper. Fewer than half the students correctly identified the actual logo when they were shown it among a number of similar logos with slightly altered features.

Food kinetics: Color of lettuce linked to antioxidant effect

Antioxidants provide long-term protection against the chain reactions of free radical processes, in other words, of the molecules that are capable of causing cell damage and generating various diseases. Free radicals harm our body by causing, in the best of cases, ageing and, in the worse, serious diseases. Lettuce is rich in antioxidants, as it contains compounds like phenolic acids, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and vitamins A and C, among other things.

Green, semi-red and red leaves

Playing music by musicians activates genes responsible for brain function and singing of songbirds

Although music perception and practice are well preserved in human evolution, the biological determinants of music practice are largely unknown. According to a latest study, music performance by professional musicians enhanced the activity of genes involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission, motor behavior, learning and memory. Interestingly, several of those up-regulated genes were also known to be responsible for song production in songbirds, which suggests a potential evolutionary conservation in sound perception and production across species.