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Discovery reveals how bacteria distinguish harmful vs. helpful viruses

Discovery reveals how bacteria distinguish harmful vs. helpful viruses

When they are not busy attacking us, germs go after each other. But when viruses invade bacteria, it doesn't always spell disaster for the infected microbes: Sometimes viruses actually carry helpful genes that a bacterium can harness to, say, expand its diet or better attack its own hosts.

Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds

Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds

In other runs of the simulation, Krumholz and Feng observed that even clouds that do not turn much of their gas into stars—as the Sun's parent cloud probably didn't—still produce stars with nearly-identical abundances. "We've provided the missing physical explanation of how and why chemical mixing works, and shown convincingly that the chemical mixing process is very general and rapid even in an environment which did not yield a star cluster, like the one where the Sun must have formed," said Krumholz.

Mixing in star-forming clouds explains why sibling stars look alike

Mixing in star-forming clouds explains why sibling stars look alike

Krumholz and UC Santa Cruz graduate student Yi Feng used supercomputers to simulate two streams of interstellar gas coming together to form a cloud that, over the course of a few million years, collapses under its own gravity to make a cluster of stars. Studies of interstellar gas show much greater variation in chemical abundances than is seen among stars within the same open star cluster. To represent this variation, the researchers added "tracer dyes" to the two gas streams in the simulations.

NASA sees Hurricane Cristobal racing through North Atlantic

NASA sees Hurricane Cristobal racing through North Atlantic

Satellite imagery shows Hurricane Cristobal racing through the North Atlantic on Friday, August 29 while losing its tropical characteristics. An image from NOAA's GOES-East satellite showed Cristobal headed south of Greenland. The previous day, NASA's TRMM satellite saw heavy rainfall occurring in the hurricane.

Astrophysicists report radioactive cobalt in supernova explosion

Astrophysicists report radioactive cobalt in supernova explosion

A group of astrophysicists, including researchers from MIPT, have detected the formation of radioactive cobalt during a supernova explosion, lending credence to a corresponding theory of supernova explosions. Details are given in the journal Nature, one of the most cited scientific publications in the world.

Researchers use NASA and other data to look into the heart of a solar storm

Researchers use NASA and other data to look into the heart of a solar storm

A space weather storm from the sun engulfed our planet on Jan. 21, 2005. The event got its start on Jan. 20, when a cloud of solar material, a coronal mass ejection or CME, burst off the sun and headed toward Earth. When it arrived at our planet, the ring current and radiation belts surrounding Earth swelled with extra particles, while the aurora persisted for six hours. Both of these are usually signs of a very large storm – indeed, this was one of the largest outpouring of solar protons ever monitored from the sun.

Doctor revalidation needs to address 7 key issues for success, claims report

New research launched today, 1st September 2014, has concluded that there are seven key issues that need to be addressed to ensure the future success of doctor revalidation, the most profound revision in medical regulation since the Medical Act of 1858.

New method predicts optimal number and location of AEDs

Barcelona, Spain – Saturday 30 August 2014: A new method to predict the optimal number and location of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) was presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Benjamin Dahan from France. According to the predictive method, Paris needs 350 AEDs located in public places for optimal prevention of out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).

Mysteries of space dust revealed

The first analysis of space dust collected by a special collector onboard NASA's Stardust mission and sent back to Earth for study in 2006 suggests the tiny specks open a door to studying the origins of the solar system and possibly the origin of life itself.

A VA exit strategy

LEBANON, NH ­– As the federal government plans its exit strategy from the war, now may be the time for it to rethink its role in providing health care to veterans, says a Perspective piece in the New England Journal of Medicine.