Heavens

Agricultural fires in the Ukraine

Agricultural fires in the Ukraine

Numerous fires (marked with red dots) are burning in Eastern Europe, likely as a result of regional agricultural practices. The body of water at the lower left of this true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image is the Sea of Azov. The Sea is bordered by Ukraine to the northwest, west and southwest and by Russia to the northeast, east, and southeast. To its left is the Black Sea.

NASA sees Hurricane Edouard enter cooler waters

NASA sees Hurricane Edouard enter cooler waters

After tropical cyclones reach their peak intensity and continue to age, it's not uncommon for their wind field (i.e., circulation) to expand. That is the case with Edouard, this can happen as the result of an "eyewall replacement cycle" where a newer outer eyewall forms around the original eyewall creating a double eye-wall structure (i.e., the two concentric rainbands) and another ring of stronger winds around the center but further out.

Dogs can be pessimists too

Dogs can be pessimists too

Dogs generally seem to be cheerful, happy-go-lucky characters, so you might expect that most would have an optimistic outlook on life.

In fact some dogs are distinctly more pessimistic than others, research from the University of Sydney shows.

Hubble helps find smallest known galaxy containing a supermassive black hole

Hubble helps find smallest known galaxy containing a supermassive black hole

Astronomers using data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and ground observation have found an unlikely object in an improbable place -- a monster black hole lurking inside one of the tiniest galaxies ever known.

The black hole is five times the mass of the one at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. It is inside one of the densest galaxies known to date -- the M60-UCD1 dwarf galaxy that crams 140 million stars within a diameter of about 300 light-years, which is only 1/500th of our galaxy's diameter.

Survey: Fortune 500 employees can expect to pay more for health insurance

Employees working for Fortune 500 companies can expect to pay higher employee contributions for their health insurance, according to a survey of chief human resource officers about the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (also known as PPACA or Obamacare) conducted by the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina this past May/June.

Space: The final frontier ... open to the public

Historically, spaceflight has been reserved for the very healthy. Astronauts are selected for their ability to meet the highest physical and psychological standards to prepare them for any unknown challenges. However, with the advent of commercial spaceflight, average people can now fly for enjoyment. The aerospace medicine community has had very little information about what medical conditions or diseases should be considered particularly risky in the spaceflight environment, as most medical conditions have never been studied for risk in space — until now.

Kids eat better if their parents went to college

Children of college-educated parents eat more vegetables and drink less sugar, according to a new study from the University of British Columbia. But it's still not enough, the study goes on to say, as all kids are falling short when it comes to eating healthier at school

The research suggests a parent's educational attainment, an indicator of socioeconomic status, may inform a child's diet.

Lunar explorers will walk at higher speeds than thought

A massive black hole has been found at the center of an ultra-compact galaxy

A team of researchers, including an astronomer from Michigan State University, has discovered a huge black hole at the center of an ultra-compact galaxy – the smallest galaxy known to contain one.

The galaxy, known as M60-UCD1, was discovered last year by a team led by Jay Strader, MSU assistant professor of physics and astronomy. Strader was a member of the team that found the black hole.

The findings are detailed in the recent edition of the journal Nature.

Space: The final frontier… open to the public

Historically, spaceflight has been reserved for the very healthy. Astronauts are selected for their ability to meet the highest physical and psychological standards to prepare them for any unknown challenges. However, with the advent of commercial spaceflight, average people can now fly for enjoyment. The aerospace medicine community has had very little information about what medical conditions or diseases should be considered particularly risky in the spaceflight environment, as most medical conditions have never been studied for risk in space — until now.