Tech

PULLMAN, Wash. - Many researchers know that new high-efficiency buildings don't typically get used as intended. The numbers don't add up, and occupants can easily waste energy if they do not understand how to use the building.

Julia Day, assistant professor in Washington State University's School of Design and Construction, set out to learn why.

If you have a heart attack or stroke, it's important to get your "bad" cholesterol measured by your doctor on a follow up visit. Researchers have found that one step is significantly associated with a reduced risk of suffering another serious cardiovascular episode.

Heart failure patients discharged from the hospital with a reduced level of a common hormone produced by the heart had significantly lower rates of readmission and lower death rates, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City.

WASHINGTON, DC -- Research released today highlights advances in the use of CRISPR-Cas9 and human induced pluripotent stem cell technologies to identify novel therapeutic targets for neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and addiction. The studies were presented at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

Researchers have developed a melanin-enhanced cancer immunotherapy technique that can also serve as a vaccine, based on early experiments done in a mouse model. The technique is applied via a transdermal patch.

Researchers from the Camborne School of Mines have identified methods to predict the environmental and social cost of resourcing new deposits of rare earth minerals used in the production of mobile phones, wind turbines and electric vehicles.

The team are pioneering techniques to develop the equivalent of a 'Fairtrade' model for ethically and sustainably resourcing raw materials that are crucial in the manufacturing of next generation technologies.

Research-clinicians at Children's National Health System and Drexel University College of Medicine led the first study to identify a promising treatment to reduce or prevent brain injury in newborns who have suffered hypoxia-ischemia, a serious complication in which restricted blood flow deprives the brain of oxygen.

The principles of the gene network for colon tumorigenesis have been identified by a KAIST research team. The principles will be used to find the molecular target for effective anti-cancer drugs in the future. Further, this research gained attention for using a systems biology approach, which is an integrated research area of IT and BT.

Bottom Line: Establishing the way in which a genetic alteration called a TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion forms in a prostate cancer, rather than the presence of the gene fusion itself, could help identify patients with prostate cancer with a low risk of spreading, which might determine the best course of treatment for the patient.

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Author: John C. Cheville, MD, professor of pathology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill. -- A recently published white paper from the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) and the Association for Bariatric Endoscopy (ABE) breaks new ground in defining the role and value of the latest approaches for obesity management. Based on the proceedings and conclusions of the EndoVators Summit on Obesity convened last November, the paper reports on the scope and impact of the obesity problem as well as the multiple factors and players involved in treating this chronic condition.