Feed aggregator

New drug combination helps kickstart the immune system to fight back against cancer

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Scientists from King's College London have found a way to boost the immune system to help it fight back against cancer. The breakthrough involves the first ever use of a combination of chemotherapy and a drug being trialed as a treatment for neonatal jaundice, that together help kick start the body's natural defenses.
Categories: Content

Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell production

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Columbia Engineering researchers have developed a new method for improving T cell manufacture by focusing on the materials involved in this process. Their study uses a polymer mesh to activate the T cells, a critical step for their production. This approach simplifies processing compared to systems in use today. In addition, making the fibers out of a mechanically soft material improved T cell growth, outperforming the current gold standard on several fronts. (Advanced Biosystems)
Categories: Content

Presurgical targeted therapy delays relapse of high-risk stage 3 melanoma

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
A pair of targeted therapies given before and after surgery for melanoma produced at least a six-fold increase in time to progression compared to standard-of-care surgery for patients with stage 3 disease, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Lancet Oncology. Patients who had no sign of disease at surgery after combination treatment did not progress to metastasis.
Categories: Content

Should all patients be asked about their sexual orientation?

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
In late 2017, NHS England released guidelines recommending that health professionals ask all patients about their sexual orientation in order to improve services for non-heterosexual patients, but should they? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today.
Categories: Content

Duration of treatment rather than dose more strongly associated with opioid misuse after surgery

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Prescribing higher opioid doses for shorter durations may be a more effective way to treat pain after surgery, while minimizing the risk of longer term misuse and addiction, suggest US researchers in The BMJ today.
Categories: Content

New study validates clotting risk factors in chronic kidney disease

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
In late 2017, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine discovered and published a potential treatment target to prevent chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients from developing thrombosis (blood clots) without causing bleeding complications. They found that boosting a regulatory protein named STUB1 decreased the abundance of tissue factor (TF) and prevented blood vessel blockages in experimental models. Now, these same researchers have tested other aspect of this hypothesis in humans with promising results.
Categories: Content

Default setting in electronic medical records 'nudged' emergency department physicians to limit opioid prescriptions to 10 tablets

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
For patients who have never been prescribed opioids, larger numbers of tablets given with the initial prescription is associated with long-term use and more tablets leftover that could be diverted for misuse or abuse. Implementing a default option for a lower quantity of tablets in the electronic medical records (EMR) discharge orders may help combat the issue by 'nudging' physicians to prescribe smaller quantities consistent with prescribing guidelines Penn Medicine researchers show in a new study.
Categories: Content

Antibodies show effectiveness for HIV prevention and promise for treatment and cure

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Recent studies testing multivalent combinations of three broadly neutralizing antibodies, or bnAbs, have yielded promising results in animal models of HIV prevention. Two investigators at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill describe the potential of bnAbs to inform HIV prevention, treatment and cure strategies in a recent article in the New Journal of Medicine.
Categories: Content

Patients with blood cancer precursor at risk of developing cancer even after 30 years

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are at risk of progressing to multiple myeloma or a related cancer -- even after 30 years of stability. These are the findings of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Wednesday, Jan. 17, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Categories: Content

Mammogram rates increase after ACA eliminates co-payments

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
A new study finds that screening mammogram rates increased after the Affordable Care Act eliminated out-of-pocket costs.
Categories: Content

The brain's creativity controls

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Scientists studying brain scans of people who were asked to come up with inventive uses for everyday objects found a specific pattern of connectivity that correlated with the most creative responses. Researchers were then able to use that pattern to predict how creative other people's responses would be based on their connections in this network.
Categories: Content

Dulling cancer therapy's double-edged sword

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Researchers have discovered a very promising new pathway to preventing tumor recurrence -- 'resolvins' could be used in complement with chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapies to stave off the tumor-promoting effects of dead cancer cell debris.
Categories: Content

Brain protein changes could explain how concussions affect patients

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Traumatic brain injuries, whether suffered from a blow on the football field or the battle field, can be devastating, leading to disability and shortened lives. However, little is known about how different levels of injury and time affect the brain, hindering efforts to develop effective treatments. Scientists now report results from rodent studies in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research showing that signaling molecules are likely involved in mild cases, also known as concussions.
Categories: Content

How your brain remembers what you had for dinner last night

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Confirming earlier computational models, researchers at University of California San Diego and UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Arizona and Louisiana, report that episodic memories are encoded in the hippocampus of the human brain by distinct, sparse sets of neurons.
Categories: Content

A step toward ridding register receipts of BPA

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Although the US and other countries have banned or restricted the use of bisphenol A (BPA) because of environmental and health concerns, it is still used in thermally printed receipts and labels. Now researchers report in a study in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research that they have developed potentially safer polymers that could replace BPA for printed papers.
Categories: Content

Prospective birth control pill for men has its origin in an arrow poison

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
Women have many options for oral contraceptives that are safe, effective and reversible, but despite decades of research, men have none. Now, scientists report a rat study in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry that shows they finally have a good lead for a male birth control pill. It's based on ouabain, a plant extract that African warriors and hunters traditionally used as a heart-stopping poison on their arrows.
Categories: Content

Researchers explore psychological effects of climate change

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
While some people have little anxiety about the Earth's changing climate, others are experiencing high levels of stress, and even depression, based on their perception of the threat of global climate change, researchers found. Psychological responses to climate change seem to vary based on what type of concern people show for the environment, with those highly concerned about the planet's animals and plants experiencing the most stress.
Categories: Content

Fort McMurray researchers find simple key to risk of severe peat fires

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
The scrawny black spruce trees that push up through the peat bogs of Canada's boreal forest are valuable indicators of fire risk, say researchers who studied a burned-over area just outside Fort McMurray, Alberta, where a devastating wildfire struck in 2016.
Categories: Content

Novel chip-based gene expression tool analyzes RNA quickly and accurately

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
A University of Illinois and Mayo collaboration has demonstrated a novel gene expression analysis technique that can accurately measure levels of RNA quickly and directly from a cancerous tissue sample while preserving the spatial information across the tissue -- something that conventional methods cannot do.
Categories: Content

Nearly imperceptible fluctuations in movement correspond to autism diagnoses

Eurekalert - Jan 17 2018 - 00:01
A new study led by researchers at Indiana University and Rutgers University provides the strongest evidence yet that nearly imperceptible changes in how people move can be used to diagnose neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism.
Categories: Content