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Tropical Cyclone Joyce soaking northwestern Australia coast

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Tropical Cyclone Joyce, formerly known as tropical cyclone 5S, was moving south along the coast of Cape Leveque, Western Australia on Jan. 11 when a polar-orbiting satellite passed overhead. NOAA's JPSS-1 satellite provided a visible image of the tropical storm as it continued to move south along the northwestern part of Western Australia.
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UCLA scientists make cells that enable the sense of touch

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have, for the first time, coaxed human stem cells to become sensory interneurons -- the cells that give us our sense of touch. The new protocol could be a step toward stem cell-based therapies to restore sensation in paralyzed people who have lost feeling in parts of their body.
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Scientist's work may provide answer to martian mountain mystery

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
By seeing which way the wind blows, a University of Texas at Dallas fluid dynamics expert has helped propose a solution to a Martian mountain mystery. Dr. William Anderson, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, co-authored a paper published in the journal Physical Review E that explains the common Martian phenomenon of a mountain positioned downwind from the center of an ancient meteorite impact zone.
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Patient education brochure provides low-cost solution to avoid diversion of unused Opioids

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
A new patient education brochure that describes safe disposal practices of unused pain pills can be a low-cost and effective way of getting patients to properly dispose of their leftover medications.
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Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
A new article publishing in the forthcoming volume of the Annual Review of Public Health focuses on harm minimization and smoking cessation, with alternative nicotine products like e-cigarettes emerging as a promising avenue for people who want to quit smoking.
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New polygenic hazard score predicts when men develop prostate cancer

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
An international team, led by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, has developed and validated a genetic tool for predicting age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer, a disease that kills more than 26,000 American men annually.
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Correct warm-up reduces soccer injuries in children by half

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
A warm-up program developed specially for children reduces soccer injuries by around 50 percent. Sports scientists from the University of Basel reported these findings in the academic journal Sports Medicine. A total of 243 teams comprising around 3,900 children from four European countries took part in the study.
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Pulses of light to encrypt data and protect security of cryptocurrencies

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Data travels through thousands of miles of fiber optic cables underneath the world's oceans--via pulses of light. And according to experts, the data in these cables is at great risk of being intercepted. However, a newly designed frequency comb--recently developed by researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering might be an effective tool for data encryption.
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Mount Sinai research discovers possible link between Crohn's & Parkinson's in Jewish population

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Findings could lead to new treatments and early diagnosis.
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Hormone therapy may reduce eating disorder symptoms in transgender people

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
New research has shown that receiving cross-sex hormone therapy (CHT) can help to reduce the feelings of body dissatisfaction associated with eating disorders including anorexia and bulimia in transgender people.
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Shedding some light on life in the Arctic

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Scientists know that light triggers zooplankton and other marine organisms to move up and down in the water column during normal day and night cycles. Now, an international team of researchers have released a new report in Science Advances that reveals that zooplankton are susceptible to artificial light from research vessels, too.
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Cycling does not damage men's sexual or urinary functions

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Cycling is increasingly popular for transportation, exercise, and leisure, and its impact on sexual health has received a great deal of media attention, especially regarding erectile function. In a new report in The Journal of Urology®, researchers found that contrary to some previous studies, neither recreational nor intense cycling appear to have a negative impact on men's sexual and urinary function.
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Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosis

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which attacks the lungs, claims someone's life every 20 seconds and 1.5 million lives worldwide every year. A cure has eluded scientists for more than a century but, now, a Montreal team of researchers may have discovered a new weapon to combat this global killer. The team is re-programing - or 'training' - immune cells to kill TB. These groundbreaking findings are published online today in the journal Cell.
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Fast food makes the immune system more aggressive in the long term

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
The immune system reacts similarly to a high fat and high calorie diet as to a bacterial infection. This is shown by a study led by the University of Bonn. Unhealthy food seems to make the body's defenses more aggressive in the long term. Even long after switching to a healthy diet, inflammation towards innate immune stimulation is more pronounced. These changes may be involved in the development of arteriosclerosis and diabetes.
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Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosis

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Canadian researchers' innovative work promises to make vaccines more effective against tuberculosis and other infectious diseases like the flu.
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Estrogen-mimicking compounds in foods may reduce effectiveness of breast cancer treatment

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that two estrogen-mimicking compounds found in many foods appear to potently reverse the effects of palbociclib/letrozole, a popular drug combination for treating breast cancer.
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By altering bone marrow, training can prepare innate immune system for future challenges

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
In a new paper, published in Cell, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania collaborated with an international team to show how the innate immune system, which responds more generally to dangers detected in the body, can be trained to 'remember' past threats and respond more robustly to future challenges.
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The circadian clock sets the pace of plant growth

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Researchers at the Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) discover that the members of a protein family from the plant internal clock act sequentially to limit the plant growth until the end of the night. This knowledge could help to understand how plants face different kinds of stress that affect their growth, such as drought or high temperature.
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Marijuana farms expose spotted owls to rat poison in northwest California

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
Spotted owls and barred owls are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, with illegal marijuana farms the most likely source point, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. Proposition 64, which legalized recreational marijuana in the state, went into effect this month and is expected to intensify the issue.
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Long-lasting adaptations of the innate immune system through the bone marrow

Eurekalert - Jan 11 2018 - 00:01
The immune system not only detects and destroys pathogens such as microbes but also plays a role in the onset of diseases such as arteriosclerosis. Scientists from Radboud university medical center, Bonn, Dresden and Pennsylvania, studied a new mechanism that regulates the immune system's functioning. They discovered that cholesterol inhibitors may prevent infections, that a high-fat Western diet can have a long-lasting effect on our immunity and that even our stem cells can be disrupted.
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