Feed aggregator

Counting chromosomes: Plant scientists solve a century-old mystery about reproduction

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Geneticists have solved a century-old mystery by discovering a remarkable mechanism that enables plants to count their chromosomes. Their ability to detect imbalances in male and female contributions to the next generation determines their progeny's viability and fertility.
Categories: Content

Research reveals atomic-level changes in ALS-linked protein

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
A new study details the minute changes -- down to the level of individual atoms -- that cause a particular protein to form cell-damaging clumps associated with ALS and other diseases.
Categories: Content

Babies' babbling betters brains, language

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Babies are adept at getting what they need -- including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key.
Categories: Content

Can mice really mirror humans when it comes to cancer?

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
A new Michigan State University study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer. The findings reveal how mice can actually mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral and esophagus.
Categories: Content

DNA study casts light on century-old mystery of how cells divide

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Scientists have solved a longstanding puzzle of how cells are able to tightly package lengthy strands of DNA when they divide -- an essential process for growth, repair and maintenance in living organisms.
Categories: Content

Bacteria under your feet

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
In cooperation with Universidad Rey Juan Carlos - URJCAn international team of researchers, including ERC grantee Fernando T. Maestre from Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), pieced together a global atlas of soil bacteria. The study, published today in Science, identifies some five hundred species of dominant bacteria living in soils worldwide. The findings, based on EU-funded research, could open new paths to improve soil fertility and increase agricultural production.
Categories: Content

Network model of the musculoskeletal system predicts compensatory injuries

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
A new study led by Danielle Bassett at The University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science is the first to convert the entire human body's network of bones and muscles into a comprehensive mathematical model. A study of the network is publishing on Jan. 18 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.
Categories: Content

The flu vaccine could get a much-needed boost

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help lower that figure for future flu seasons.
Categories: Content

Fox Creek earthquakes linked to completion volume and location of hydraulic fracturing

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
The volume of hydraulic fracturing fluid and the location of well pads control the frequency and occurrence of measurable earthquakes, new Alberta Geological Survey and UAlberta research has found.
Categories: Content

Controlling nanoscale DNA robots from the macroscale

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
By powering a DNA nanorobotic arm with electric fields, scientists have achieved precise nano-scale movement that is at least five orders of magnitude faster than previously reported for DNA-driven robotic systems.
Categories: Content

A handful of bacteria dominate the Earth's soil globally

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
An assessment of soils across six continents reveals that very few bacterial taxa are consistently found in soils globally. The work represents the first global atlas of soil bacteria - comparable to atlases of plants and animals that have been available for decades.
Categories: Content

Where are individual refugees most likely to succeed professionally?

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
A machine learning-based algorithm can substantially improve employment prospects for refugees over current approaches, easing their transition as they become accustomed to a new home. After experiencing war and years of displacement, refugees arrive in a new country with few resources and must adjust to an unfamiliar society.
Categories: Content

CancerSEEK: Generalized screening for multiple cancer types

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Researchers have developed a noninvasive blood test based on combined analysis of DNA and proteins that may allow earlier detection of eight common cancer types. In more than 1,000 patients, their method, dubbed CancerSEEK, detected cancer with a sensitivity of 69 to 98 percent (depending on cancer type).
Categories: Content

Packing a genome, step-by-step

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
For the first time, scientists can see in minute-time resolution how cells package chromosomes into highly condensed structures prior to cell division.
Categories: Content

Researchers create first global atlas of the bacteria living in your dirt

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
What lives in your dirt? University of Colorado Boulder researchers are one step closer to finding out after compiling the first global atlas of soil bacterial communities and identifying a group of around 500 key species that are both common and abundant worldwide.
Categories: Content

Not just commodities: World needs broader appreciation of nature's contributions to people

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
In Science, 30 experts with the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) advocate consideration of a fuller, more comprehensive range of 'nature's contributions to people' in policy- and decision-making. Says IPBES Chair Sir Robert Watson: 'This new inclusive framework demonstrates that while nature provides a bounty of essential goods and services, such as food, flood protection and many more, it also has rich social, cultural, spiritual and religious significance -- which needs to be valued in policymaking as well.'
Categories: Content

An algorithm for refugee resettlement could boost employment and integration

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Researchers designed an algorithm to match refugees with the resettlement location where they have the best chance of finding a job and putting down roots. When tested, the algorithm showed tremendous potential to increase refugees' employment rates--by 41 percent in the United States and by 73 percent in Switzerland. This is a potential policy innovation that would be practical to implement and come at virtually no cost.
Categories: Content

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations in the genome of influenza A may help counteract the weakening effects of other mutations.
Categories: Content

HIV-1 genetic diversity is higher in vaginal tract than in blood during early infection

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
A first-of-its-kind study has found that the genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is higher in the vaginal tract than in the blood stream during early infection. This finding, published in PLOS Pathogens, supports the existence of a genetic bottleneck between the vaginal tract and the bloodstream.
Categories: Content

Launch of 'DeWorm3' collection

Eurekalert - Jan 18 2018 - 00:01
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases is happy to announce the publication of a new collection, 'DeWorm3' on Jan. 18, 2018.
Categories: Content