Earth

October 15, 2019 -- Despite the evidence on risk factors for frailty, and the substantial progress that has been made in frailty awareness, the biological mechanisms underlying its development are still far from understood and translation from research to clinical practice remains a challenge, according to a new series on Frailty just published by The Lancet. Linda P.

Two new porcelain crab species have been described in the ZooKeys journal by scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and the Institut fur Tierokologie und Spezielle Zoologie der Justus-Liebig-Universitat Giessen. One of the new species, Polyonyx socialis, was discovered in the South China Sea of Vietnam. The other, Petrolisthes virgilius, has a new identity, after initially being taken for a similar-looking species--Petrolisthes tonsorius--four decades ago in the Colombian Caribbean.

Tropical Storm Ema had a very short life, but NASA's Terra satellite caught a glimpse of the storm before it dissipated in the Central Pacific Ocean.

The newest tropical storm of the Central Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed to the northwest of the Hawaiian Islands late on Oct. 12. Although there was no threat to Hawaii, there was a Tropical Storm Watch is in effect on Oct. 12 for portions of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument from Nihoa to French Frigate Shoals to Maro Reef.

Researchers at Stockholm University have developed a method for statistically predicting impacts of climate change on outbreaks of tularemia in humans. The study has been published in the journal International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The results show that tularemia may become increasingly common in the future in high-latitude regions.

Typhoon Hagibis made landfall in Japan over the weekend of October 12 and 13, bringing damaging winds, rough surf and flooding rains. NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the flooding caused by the torrential rainfall.

Hagibis made landfall just before 6 a.m. EDT (7 p.m. local time, Japan) on Oct. 12, on the Izu Peninsula, located southwest of Tokyo.

Cu2OSeO3 is a material with unusual magnetic properties. Magnetic spin vortices known as skyrmions are formed within a certain temperature range when in the presence of a small external magnetic field. Currently, moderately low temperatures of around 60 Kelvin (-213 degrees Celsius) are required to stabilise their phase, but it appears possible to shift this temperature range to room temperature. The exciting thing about skyrmions is that they can be set in motion and controlled very easily, thus offering new opportunities to reduce the energy required for data processing.

A phenomenon that has previously been seen when researchers simulate the properties of planet cores at extreme pressures has now also been observed in pure titanium at atmospheric pressure. Chains of atoms dash around at lightning speeds inside the solid material.

Finding out how kinesiophobia -unreasonable fear of movement- may affect individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain is the aim of a research group of the University of Malaga (UMA), which recent studies have been published in the scientific journal British Journal of Sports Medicine, the world's number 1 publication in the locomotor system field.

Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), challenge the accepted wisdom on wetting and drying phase behaviour.

The authors provide a firm conceptual framework for tailoring the properties of new materials, including finding super-repellant substrates, such as expelling water from windscreens, as well as understanding hydrophobic interactions at the length scale of biomolecules.

A major UConn School of Medicine study published in the American Heart Association's flagship journal Circulation shows that more aggressively controlling daily blood pressure in older adults can improve brain health.

NASA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over North Atlantic Ocean on Oct. 14 and provided forecasters with an infrared view of Tropical Storm Melissa that revealed wind shear was tearing the storm apart as it was becoming extra-tropical.

NASA's Suomi NPP satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in Tropical Storm Melissa. Infrared data provides temperature information, and the strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere have the coldest cloud top temperatures.

Recent attacks on "grievance" studies have occasioned renewed attention to the politics of knowledge in the academy. In a wide-ranging survey, Mark Horowitz, William Yaworsky and Kenneth Kickham revisit some of anthropology's most sensitive controversies. Taking the field's temperature since the sweltry "science wars" of the nineties, Horowitz and colleagues probe whether anthropology is still a house divided on questions of truth, justice and the American Anthropological Association.

Is science just one way of knowing, no more valid than other approaches to knowledge?

New insight on how the natural loss of foot muscles occurred in rodents and other species during their evolution has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.

URBANA, Ill. - Given the alarming pace of climate change, it is increasingly important to understand what factors motivate people to take action - or not - on environmental issues. A recent study in Sustainability Science shows that deeply held values, which align closely with political leanings, can predict whether someone takes action to protect the environment. And it suggests people on opposite ends of the political spectrum can be spurred to take action, as long as messaging taps into those values.

Piranha fish have a powerful bite. Their teeth help them shred through the flesh of their prey or even scrape plants off rocks to supplement their diet.

Years ago, scientists discovered that piranhas lose all of the teeth on one side of their mouth at once and regrow them, presumably to replace dulled teeth with brand new sharp spears for gnawing on prey. But no museum specimens have ever shown this theory to be true, and there's no documentation of piranhas missing an entire block of teeth.