Earth

The waters of the Mediterranean Sea continue to receive dissolved metals from the mining waste deposited in Portmán Bay (Murcia) 25 years after the cessation of mining activity. A study by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB), in collaboration with UB researchers, shows that the sea continues to be contaminated through groundwater containing heavy metals such as iron, cadmium, nickel, zinc and lead.

The researchers Haritz Sardón, Ainara Sangroniz and Agustin Etxeberria at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Chemistry, together with the researchers Eugene Y.-X. Chen, Jian-Bo Zhu and Xiaoyan Tang at Colorado State University (USA), have designed fully recyclable packaging materials that promote the circular economy for plastic packaging materials where design and production fully comply with requirements pertaining to reuse, repair and recycling. Their study has been published recently in Nature Communications and constitutes a step forward in solving the problem of plastic.

Russian mathematicians and geophysicists have made a standard technique for ore prospecting several times more effective. Their findings are reported in Geophysical Journal International, one of the most respected scientific periodicals on computational geophysics.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- As the world's climate continues to change, biologically diverse communities may be most capable of adapting to environmental challenges.

While biodiversity's importance in adaptation may be well appreciated already, new research by Brown University biologists studying the effects of wave turbulence on sea creatures paints a clearer picture of why biologically diverse communities are more likely to thrive.

DURHAM, N.H.--As global temperatures continue to rise, the thawing of permafrost in Arctic areas is being accelerated and mercury that has been trapped in the frozen ground is now being released in various forms into surrounding waterways, soil and air. According to researchers at the University of New Hampshire, this process can result in the major transformation of the mercury into more mobile and potentially toxic forms that can lead to environmental consequences and health concerns for wildlife, the fishing industry and people in the Arctic and beyond.

Natural disasters such as hurricanes often leave devastation in their wake. Residents living in affected areas are sometimes displaced or require temporary shelter while their homes -- or even neighborhoods -- are repaired or rebuilt.

But what if you are a fish and your home is a coral reef?

Researchers across the globe are searching for ways to help endangered reefs, and the animals that live there, withstand or recover from weather events, including bleaching and storms that can occur with increasingly warmer water temperatures.

For the rising number of cancer survivors worldwide, there's growing evidence that exercise is an important part of recovery. But how much, and what type of exercise, is needed?

A recent review of research, conducted by an international group of experts led by the University of British Columbia, has resulted in the development of new exercise guidelines for cancer survivors.

HILO, HAWAII, October 16, 2019--Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, in cooperation with Pacific Biosciences and Penn State University, have published the first genome of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen.

WASHINGTON--Researchers have discovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can produce vibrations in the nearby ocean floor as strong as a magnitude 3.5 earthquake.

Tropical Depression Fifteen or TD15, developed off the west coast of Africa on Oct. 14 by 5 p.m. EDT. The depression never strengthened into a tropical storm before it reached the end of its life. NASA's Terra satellite provided an image of  TD15 after stretched out and ceased being a tropical cyclone.

The fabled use of canaries in coal mines as an early warning of carbon monoxide stemmed from the birds' extreme sensitivity to toxic conditions compared to humans.

In that vein, some avian species can indicate environmental distress brought on by overdevelopment, habitat loss and rising global temperatures before an ecosystem has collapsed. Not all bird species, however, respond to environmental disturbances equally.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Mexico and found two small areas of very strong thunderstorms near two different coastlines. One area was in Potential Tropical Cyclone 17E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and the other was for another system developing in the western Gulf of Mexico.

Potential Tropical Cyclone Seventeen-E developed around 11 p.m. EDT on Oct. 15 and by 11 a.m. EDT on Oct. 16, the center of circulation made landfall over the Mexican state of Oaxaca.

The Cancer Atlas, 3rd edition, a comprehensive global overview of cancer around the globe, concludes that progress in the fight against cancer is not only possible, but achievable. The report was produced by the American Cancer Society (ACS), the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), and International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). It was released at the World Cancer Leaders' Summit in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan.

As policymakers seek to reduce carbon dioxide and other pollutants through increases in renewable energy, improving energy efficiency or electrifying transportation, a key question arises: Which interventions provide the largest benefits to avoid the negative health effects of air pollution?

(Millbrook, NY) Low-income urban neighborhoods not only have more mosquitoes, but they are larger-bodied, indicating that they could be more efficient at transmitting diseases. So reports a Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies-led study, published in the Journal of Medical Entomology, investigating how socioeconomics influences mosquito-borne disease risk in Baltimore, Maryland.