Earth

If you were able to stand on the bottom of the seafloor and look up, you would see flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down the water column like snowflakes in a phenomenon known as marine snow.

Recent disasters like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, however, have added a new element to this natural process: oil.

During these events, the natural marine snow interacts with oil and dispersants to form what's known as marine oil snow as it sinks from the surface through water column to the seafloor sediments.

Researchers at North Carolina State University have found that the oxide ceramic material lanthanum strontium manganite (LSMO) retains its magnetic properties in atomically thin layers if it is "sandwiched" between two layers of a different ceramic oxide, lanthanum strontium chromium oxide (LSCO). The findings have implications for future use of LSMO in spintronic-based computing and storage devices.

DURHAM, N.C., June 11, 2019 - Burt's Bees, a leading provider of personal care products committed to natural skin care solutions, today announced research supporting new findings related to the skin's composition and the role of nature-based regimens to protect the skin against common environmental stressors. The studies will be presented at the 24th World Congress of Dermatology (WCD) Meeting in Milan, Italy, June 10-15, 2019.

These latest research findings from Burt's Bees highlight:

The protective abilities of botanical antioxidants in photo-aging and UV protection

WASHINGTON - Nitrate pollution of U.S. drinking water may cause up to 12,594 cases of cancer a year, according to a new peer-reviewed study by the Environmental Working Group.

For the groundbreaking study, published today in the journal Environmental Research, EWG scientists estimated the number of cancer cases in each state that could be attributed to nitrate contamination of public water systems, largely caused by farm runoff containing fertilizer and manure. They also estimated the costs of treating those cases at up to $1.5 billion a year.

A new paper in The Condor: Ornithological Applications, published by Oxford University Press, finds that some songbird species benefit from the spread of fracking infrastructure while others decrease in population.

The shale gas industry has grown rapidly in recent years and its resulting infrastructure can have negative consequences for native wildlife communities. While other studies have documented negative impacts of these developments on birds and their habitats, few have described variability among species in their spatial responses to fracking.

CLEVELAND--Studying the sediment of a mountain river can reveal thousands of years or more of a waterway's history, including new threats from more frequent wildfires and increased precipitation brought by climate change.

And understanding those challenges may provide insight into other waterways, including the Cuyahoga River.

The prime predators of the Baltic Sea at the top of the food web are losing weight, according to a new study that links the deteriorating health of gray seals and cod with changes in bottom-living crustaceans, isopods and amphipods.

"It is important that you understand how the food web works when managing a fishery. It is not enough to manage how the fish and fisheries are changing. The availability and quality of food is at least as important", says Lena Bergström, researcher at the Department of Aquatic Resources at the Swedish Agricultural University.

University of Colorado Boulder researchers have developed nanobio-hybrid organisms capable of using airborne carbon dioxide and nitrogen to produce a variety of plastics and fuels, a promising first step toward low-cost carbon sequestration and eco-friendly manufacturing for chemicals.

By using light-activated quantum dots to fire particular enzymes within microbial cells, the researchers were able to create "living factories" that eat harmful CO2 and convert it into useful products such as biodegradable plastic, gasoline, ammonia and biodiesel.

In an unexpected discovery from the South Island (New Zealand), two species of narrowly distributed macro-moths were described as new species. Interestingly, both Arctesthes titanica and Arctesthes avatar were named after mythological deities and top-grossing blockbusters by famous filmmaker James Cameron: Titanic and Avatar, respectively.

On the land where Cordoba is located in the 21st century, two cities coexisted in the past, each on a hill. An Iberian city was located where Cruz Conde Park lies today, and a Roman city, which was founded at a later time, was located about 500 meters away. Archaeology has had to depend upon geological studies up to now in order to determine how the city developed throughout history, but now, thanks to LiDAR technology, 3D images have been obtained that show what the land was like where Cordoba lies before humans arrived.

During the Iron Age around 300 AD something extraordinary was initiated in Levänluhta area in Isokyrö, SW Finland. The deceased were buried in a lake, and this habit was continued for at least 400 years. When trenches were dug in the local fields in mid-1800's skulls and other human bones were surfacing. These bones had been preserved almost intact in the anoxic, ferrous water. Archaeologists, historians and locals have been wondering about these finds for over 150 years now.

CORVALLIS, Ore. - The vast subtropical "gyres" - large systems of rotating currents in the middle of the oceans - cover 40 percent of the Earth's surface and have long been considered biological deserts with stratified waters that contain very little nutrients to sustain life.

Soil food webs play a key role in supporting grassland ecosystems, which cover about one-quarter of the land on Earth. Climate change poses a threat to these environments, partly because of the uncertainty of extremes in rainfall, which is projected to increase.

To learn more about the effects of these extreme events, a team of soil and plant ecologists, led by Colorado State University faculty, studied nematodes, commonly known as roundworms, that play a key role in carbon and nutrient cycling and decomposition in soil.

A new study from Professor Doug VanderLaan's lab in UTM's Department of Psychology looking at biological mechanisms that are often thought to influence male sexual orientation was published in the latest edition of PNAS.

"Studying individual differences in gender and sexual orientation provides insight into how early-life biology shapes the brain and behaviour," says the developmental psychology researcher.

Baltimore (June 10, 2019) - Food production is an important contributor to climate change, accounting for about a quarter of carbon emissions globally. According to a study that examined the real-world diets of thousands of people in the U.S., we could greatly reduce the carbon footprint of what we eat by changing just one food each day.

"We found that making one substitution of poultry for beef resulted in an average reduction of dietary greenhouse gases by about a half," said lead study author Diego Rose, PhD, professor and director of nutrition at Tulane University.