Content

A biomarker in the brain's circulation system may be Alzheimer's earliest warning

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Leaks in the blood-brain barrier can provide early detection for Alzheimer's and diseases.
Categories: Content

New AGS-NIA conference report explores links between senses and cognitive health

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Experts at a prestigious medical conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) hope their work --reported today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society -- will have colleagues seeing eye-to-eye on an important but under-researched area of health care: The link between impaired vision, hearing, and cognition (the medical term for our memory and thinking capabilities, which are impacted as we age by health concerns like dementia and Alzheimer's disease).
Categories: Content

Exploring the effects of integrative health in cancer

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
A Special Focus Issue on Integrative Oncology takes a wide-ranging view of the possible approaches and potential therapeutic benefits of complementary and integrative medicine in multiple age groups, nations, and special populations.
Categories: Content

NASA's Terra Satellite glares at the 37-mile wide eye of Super Typhoon Trami 

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Super Typhoon Trami as it continued moving in a northwesterly direction in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Terra provided an amazing image of the large eye.
Categories: Content

Overlooked signal in MRI scans reflects amount, kind of brain cells

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
A six-minute MRI scan gives enough data for researchers to study how the brain develops, or to detect the loss of brain cells due to injury or illness.
Categories: Content

Thousands of DNA changes in the developing brain revealed by machine learning

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have developed new single-cell approaches wedded to machine learning that allow detection of CNVs below one million base pairs. This has revealed thousands of previously unknown DNA changes arising during prenatal life in the developing mouse brain. The researchers also identified when these changes peaked: evidence that potential regulatory mechanisms -- which remain unknown -- are involved. The study published today in PNAS.
Categories: Content

How Earth sheds heat into space

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
New insights into the role of water vapor may help researchers predict how the planet will respond to warming.
Categories: Content

Desert ants have an amazing odor memory

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Desert ants can quickly learn many different food odors and remember them for the rest of their lives. Their memory for nest odors seems to differ from their food odor memory: Whereas food odors are learned and kept after a single contact, ants need several trials to memorize nest odors and forget a nest-associated odor quickly after it has been removed from the nest. Hence, ants process food and nest odors differently in their brains.
Categories: Content

Chinese Cretaceous fossil highlights avian evolution

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
A newly identified extinct bird species from a 127-million-year-old fossil deposit in northeastern China provides new information about avian development during the early evolution of flight. Drs. WANG Min, Thomas Stidham, and ZHOU Zhonghe from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology reported their study of the well-preserved complete skeleton and feathers of this early bird.
Categories: Content

Urbanization is cutting off life support to NYC's wetlands

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Using sediment cores to trace the evolution of Jamaica Bay's wetlands, a team led by researchers within Columbia's Earth Institute finds that urbanization is weakening the shoreline and starving the marshes of vital mineral sediment, causing their gradual but dramatic erosion.
Categories: Content

New earthquake risk model could better inform disaster planning

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Researchers have developed a new way to model seismic risk, which they hope will better inform disaster risk reduction planning in earthquake-prone areas.
Categories: Content

Evidence that addictive behaviors have strong links with ancient retroviral infection

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
New research from an international team led by Oxford University's Department of Zoology and the National-Kapodistrian University of Athens, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), shows that an ancient retrovirus -- HK2 -- is more frequently found in drug addicts and thus is significantly associated with addiction.
Categories: Content

Cambridge scientists reveal ground-breaking plan to target cause of Alzheimer's disease

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
A breakthrough has been made in the fight against Alzheimer's disease -- researchers have found a new way to target the toxic particles that destroy healthy brain cells. Academics at the University of Cambridge and at Lund University in Sweden have devised the first strategy to 'go after' the cause of the devastating disease, leading to hope that new drugs could be developed to treat dementia.
Categories: Content

Taking a catnap? Mouse mutation shown to increase need for sleep

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Researchers at University of Tsukuba showed that mutation of a single amino acid in the SIK3 protein caused mice to exhibit more non-REM sleep and increased 'sleep need,' including when awake, reflected in particular patterns of brainwave activity. The findings could help research on human sleep disorders given the similarity of this protein to that in humans.
Categories: Content

Birds' voiceboxes are odd ducks

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Birds' voiceboxes are in their chests instead of their throats like mammals and reptiles. Scientists aren't sure how or why birds evolved these unique voiceboxes, but a new study in PNAS sheds some light on how they came about. Similarities in the windpipes of birds, crocodiles, cats, mice, and salamanders suggest that birds' weird voiceboxes might have arisen from a windpipe reinforcement. From this, scientists can learn about the sounds bird ancestors-- dinosaurs-- made.
Categories: Content

Birds reinvent voice box in novel evolutionary twist

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Birds tote around two vocal organs inside their bodies, but only one works. New interdisciplinary research suggests that this distinctly avian anatomy arose because birds, somewhere in their evolutionary history, opted for building a brand new vocal organ -- the syrinx-- instead of modifying an existing one that is present in an array of animals but silent in birds -- the larynx.
Categories: Content

Common weed killer linked to bee deaths

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Honey bees exposed to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, lose some of the beneficial bacteria in their guts and are more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria. Scientists believe this is evidence that glyphosate might be contributing to the decline of honey bees and native bees around the world.
Categories: Content

Even mild physical activity immediately improves memory function, UCI-led study finds

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Researchers at the University of California, Irvine, and Japan's University of Tsukuba found that even very light workouts can increase the connectivity between parts of the brain responsible for memory formation and storage.
Categories: Content

NASA's Terra Satellite finds Subtropical Storm Leslie drifting in Central Atlantic

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Subtropical Storm Leslie as it was meandering around the North Central Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 24, 2018.
Categories: Content

Crowd counting through walls with WiFi

Eurekalert - Sep 24 2018 - 00:09
Researchers in UC Santa Barbara professor Yasamin Mostofi's lab have given the first demonstration of crowd counting through walls using only everyday communication signals such as WiFi. The technique, which requires only a wireless transmitter and receiver outside the area of interest, could have a variety of applications, including smart energy management, retail business planning and security.
Categories: Content