Feed aggregator

Science 2.0 Explains: How Water Exists In Two Different Forms At The Molecular Level

Science 2.0 - 14 hours 13 min ago
Everyone knows that water is a molecule in which a single oxygen atom is linked to two hydrogen atoms - H20.

But the story of water gets a lot more scientifically interesting the deeper you go. Water actually exists in two different forms, called isomers, at the molecular level.

They have almost identical physical properties, you can't tell the difference, but chemists can tell them apart by the relative orientation of the nuclear spins of the two hydrogen atoms.  They are called ortho- or para-water depending on whether the spins are aligned in the same or opposite direction.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Marine Litter: The Public Mistakenly Trusts Environmental Groups, And That Impedes Progress

Science 2.0 - 15 hours 13 min ago
Across Europe, 95 percent of people claim to have seen seen litter when they visited the coast - yet they say they don't litter. And they don't trust scientists, corporations or government to solve it, which leaves environmentalists who don't ever actually send people into the wilderness to clean up litter.

Marine litter is a big deal thanks to environmental publicity but it is highly exaggerated - think mercury in salmon, alar on apples, floating barges of garbage, estrogen in drinking water and more to get an idea of how these issues get magnified. 

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Hepatitis B In Africa Might Be Solved With A $20 Test

Science 2.0 - 16 hours 13 min ago

Sub-Saharan Africa has around 80 million people infected with hepatitis B, a liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus, but it infects around 250 million people worldwide. It can be a mild illness lasting a few weeks or a serious, lifelong condition. It is transmitted through blood and bodily fluids.  

An accurate diagnostic score that consists of inexpensive blood tests costing around $20 could help diagnose thousands of patients with hepatitis B in need of treatment in some of Africa's poorest regions, far more affordable than the $100-500 for current tests.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Do-Gooderism: A Religious Cult for Millennials

ACSH - Jul 20 2018 - 20:07

For do-gooders, the ends justify the means. Do-gooders believe they are saving the world, therefore any tactic is completely defensible. In Santa Barbara, selling a drink with a plastic straw could result in a $1,000 fine and six months in jail. 

Categories: ACSH

Cancer Patients Who Use Complementary Medicine (Refuse Conventional) Twice As Likely To Die, Says Study

ACSH - Jul 20 2018 - 15:07

Complementary medicine (CM) ranges from authentic stress relieving massage and well-meaning, but expensive placebo to outright spurious healing claims. Researchers decided to study its impact on patients with curable cancers.

Categories: ACSH

Diabetes Raises Risk Of Cancer In Women, And Men, Sometimes

Science 2.0 - Jul 20 2018 - 13:07
A review of data on nearly 20 million people has concluded that having diabetes significantly raises the risk of developing cancer.

For women the risk is even higher, not just of cancer but also leukemia and cancers of the stomach, mouth and kidney. Men, however, had less risk for liver cancer. If none of that makes sense, you see the flaws in replacing science with epidemiological statistics.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Toxic Chemical Cocktails - Where Endocrine Disruption Starts To Sound Like Homeopathy

ACSH - Jul 20 2018 - 12:07

Paracelsus famously noted that the dose makes the poison.

Categories: ACSH

Medicaid Expansion Boosts Employment Among Disabled People

Science 2.0 - Jul 20 2018 - 09:07
States that have expanded Medicaid coverage as part of the Affordable Care Act have higher numbers of individuals with disabilities employed that states that did not.

Medicaid is a taxpayer-funded program that provides free or low-cost health coverage to low-income people, the elderly, and people with disabilities.  As many states are considering work requirements for Medicaid eligibility, the authors of a new paper believe Medicaid expansion is acting as an employment incentive for people with disabilities.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Why The Young Get More Infections Than Adults - Evolution

Science 2.0 - Jul 20 2018 - 07:07
It isn't just human adults who regard youth as disease factories, in many species the young are often more susceptible to infection than adults, even after accounting for prior exposure to infection.

Evolution has an explanation for that. But like a lot of things in evolution, it may seem puzzling.

It shouldn't make sense, since dying young or becoming infertile due to infection means organisms will be unable to reproduce, but many species may have evolved to prioritize growth over immunity while maturing. And that complexity may be why immunity varies with age in different species.

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

Aspirin Dosage, to Battle Heart Disease, May Depend on Your Weight

ACSH - Jul 20 2018 - 07:07

While aspirin has been shown to be effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events, there have previously been no dosage recommendations tailored to a person's weight. But a new study indicates that a weight needs to be considered to improve helpful outcomes and prevent any harmful effects from occurring.

Categories: ACSH

Vaping Helps Smokers Quit - Even If They Don't Want To

Science 2.0 - Jul 20 2018 - 06:07
A new study shows that smokers who switch to nicotine vapor alternatives (e.g. e-cigarettes or iQOS) may be better able to stay smoke-free in the long term - even if they didn't set out to quit smoking. 

And that even people who didn't want to stop smoking have eventually quit because they found vaping more enjoyable.  E-cigarettes contain nicotine, which is the addictive component of cigarettes also, but it's toxic chemicals in smoke that cause the harms of smoking. That is why e-cigarettes have caught on as an aid to help people quit smoking for good, whereas patches and gums are only effective for about 10 percent. 

read more

Categories: Science 2.0

SF State study compares athlete and truck driver, identical twins

Eurekalert - Jul 20 2018 - 00:07
Identical twins share over 99 percent of the same genetic material, which can make them ideal subjects for studying how other factors besides genetics can affect health. A new study by the San Francisco State University Kinesiology Department, CSU Fullerton, and Cal Poly, Pomona finds that 30 years of strenuous exercise made one twin much healthier than the other, with one exception.
Categories: Content

Texas A&M study: Sahara dust may make you cough, but it's a storm killer

Eurekalert - Jul 20 2018 - 00:07
The bad news: Dust from the Sahara Desert in Africa -- totaling a staggering 2 to 9 trillion pounds worldwide -- has been almost a biblical plague on Texas and much of the Southern United States in recent weeks. The good news: the same dust appears to be a severe storm killer.
Categories: Content

NASA prepares to launch Parker Solar Probe, a mission to touch the Sun

Eurekalert - Jul 20 2018 - 00:07
No earlier than Aug. 6, 2018, a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy will thunder to space carrying the car-sized spacecraft, which will study the Sun closer than any human-made object ever has.
Categories: Content

Wearable device from Stanford measures cortisol in sweat

Eurekalert - Jul 20 2018 - 00:07
By drawing in a bit of sweat, a patch developed in the lab of Alberto Salleo can reveal how much cortisol a person is producing. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone but is involved in many important physiological functions.
Categories: Content

Parakeet pecking orders, basketball match-ups, and the tenure-track

Eurekalert - Jul 20 2018 - 00:07
Researchers from the Santa Fe Institute describe a new algorithm called SpringRank that uses wins and losses to quickly find rankings lurking in large networks. When tested on a wide range of synthetic and real-world datasets, ranging from teams in an NCAA college basketball tournament to the social behavior of animals, SpringRank outperformed other ranking algorithms in predicting outcomes and in efficiency.
Categories: Content

SPIE journal announces public access to largest multi-lesion medical imaging dataset

Eurekalert - Jul 20 2018 - 00:07
A paper published today in the Journal of Medical Imaging - "DeepLesion: Automated mining of large-scale lesion annotations and universal lesion detection with deep learning," -- announced the open availability of the largest CT lesion-image database accessible to the public. Such data are the foundations for the training sets of machine-learning algorithms; until now, large-scale annotated radiological image datasets, essential for the development of deep learning approaches, have not been publicly available.
Categories: Content

Eagle-eyed machine learning algorithm outdoes human experts

Eurekalert - Jul 20 2018 - 00:07
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have trained computers to quickly and consistently detect and analyze microscopic radiation damage to materials under consideration for nuclear reactors. And the computers bested humans in this arduous task.
Categories: Content

Two NASA satellites confirm Tropical Cyclone Ampil's heaviest rainfall shift

Eurekalert - Jul 20 2018 - 00:07
Two NASA satellites observed Tropical Storm Ampil in six and a half hours and found the storm's heaviest rainfall occurring in a band of thunderstorms shifted from north to south of the center. NASA's GPM satellite passed over the storm first and NASA's Aqua satellite made the second pass.
Categories: Content

The need for speed: Why malaria parasites are faster than human immune cells

Eurekalert - Jul 20 2018 - 00:07
Elementary cytoskeleton protein is different in parasites and represents a starting point for a possible new therapy against malaria infections. Researchers from the Heidelberg University Hospital, the Centre for Molecular Biology at the University of Heidelberg (ZMBH), and the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS) have published these findings in the journal "PLOS Biology".
Categories: Content