Brain

Paraplegics regain some feeling, movement after using brain-machine interfaces

Paraplegics regain some feeling, movement after using brain-machine interfaces

Eight people who have spent years paralyzed from spinal cord injuries have regained partial sensation and muscle control in their lower limbs after training with brain-controlled robotics, according to a study published Aug. 11 in Scientific Reports.

The patients used brain-machine interfaces, including a virtual reality system that used their own brain activity to simulate full control of their legs. Videos accompanying the study illustrate their progress.

Brain-machine interface triggers recovery for paraplegic patients

Brain-machine interface triggers recovery for paraplegic patients

During the 2014 FIFA World Cup opening ceremony, a young Brazilian man, paralyzed from the chest down, delivered the opening kickoff. He used a brain-machine interface, allowing him to control the movements of a lower-limb robotic exoskeleton.

This unprecedented scientific demonstration was the work of the Walk Again Project (WAP), a nonprofit, international research consortium that includes Alan Rudolph, vice president for research at Colorado State University, who is also an adjunct faculty member at Duke University's Center for Neuroengineering.

Orangutan able to guess a taste without sampling it, just like us

Orangutan able to guess a taste without sampling it, just like us

Without having tasted a specific new juice mix before, an orangutan in a Swedish zoo has enough sense to know whether it will taste nice or not based on how he recombined relevant memories from the past. Only humans were previously thought to have this ability of affective forecasting, in which prior experiences are used to conjure up mental pictures about totally new situations, says Gabriela-Alina Sauciuc of Lund University in Sweden, in Springer's journal Animal Cognition.

Neurodevelopmental model of Williams syndrome offers insight into human social brain

Neurodevelopmental model of Williams syndrome offers insight into human social brain

In a study spanning molecular genetics, stem cells and the sciences of both brain and behavior, researchers at University of California San Diego, with colleagues at the Salk Institute of Biological Studies and elsewhere, have created a neurodevelopmental model of a rare genetic disorder that may provide new insights into the underlying neurobiology of the human social brain.

The findings are published in the August 10 online edition of Nature.

Neuron unites 2 theoretical models on motion detection

Neuron unites 2 theoretical models on motion detection

As indicated by their name, photoreceptor cells in the eye respond to light: is an image point bright or dark? They do not indicate the direction of a movement. This perception only arises in the brain through the comparative computations of light signals coming from adjacent image points. Engineers, physicists and neurobiologists have been debating the exact nature of these computations for around 50 years.

How incivility spreads in the workplace

How incivility spreads in the workplace

EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Condescending comments, put-downs and sarcasm have become commonplace in the politically charged workplace, and a new study co-authored by a Michigan State University business scholar shows how this incivility may be spreading.

Reporting in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Russell Johnson and colleagues found that experiencing such rude behavior reduces employees' self-control and leads them to act in a similar uncivil manner.

In right balance, environmental regulations increased firms' profits, new study finds

LAWRENCE -- CEOs and corporate lobbyists often spend plenty of time decrying how potential government regulations will affect their bottom line, but a new University of Kansas study finds that the U.S. Clean Water Act, when implemented in the right balance, improves firms' profitability.

Brain-machine interfaces trigger partial neurological recovery in chronic paraplegics

On June 12th 2014, the Walk Again Project (WAP), a non-profit international research consortium, performed a unique scientific demonstration, during the opening ceremony of the Soccer World Cup in Brazil. During that demo, a young Brazilian man paralyzed from his chest down, delivered the opening kickoff of the World Cup by using a brain-machine interface that allowed him to control the movements of a lower-limb robotic exoskeleton, while receiving tactile feedback from the exo's feet.

Plenty of light during daytime reduces the effect of blue light screens on night sleep

The use of smartphones and tablet computers during evening hours has previously been associated with sleep disturbances in humans. A new study from Uppsala University now shows that daytime light exposure may be a promising means to combat sleep disturbances associated with evening use of electronic devices. The findings are published in the scientific journal Sleep Medicine.

'Cultural learners' in the cradle

We are "culturally biased" right from the cradle and we tend to prefer information we receive from native speakers of our language, even when this information is not transmitted through verbal speech. Hanna Marno, researcher at the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste (together with other colleagues among whom Jacques Mehler and Marina Nespor, professors at SISSA, -that coordinated the study- and Yamil Vidal, SISSA Ph.D.