Male bees have more than a one-track mind

Male bees have more than a one-track mind

Male bumblebees are just as smart as female worker bees despite their dim-witted reputation, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Researchers from QMUL's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences trained male and female bumblebees to distinguish between artificial flowers that contained food and another that did not.

The new study published today (Friday 13 Nov.) in the journal Animal Behaviour found male bumblebees equal the female or worker bee's excellence in learning which flowers reward with food.

Experimental drug targeting Alzheimer's disease shows anti-aging effects

Experimental drug targeting Alzheimer's disease shows anti-aging effects

LA JOLLA--Salk Institute researchers have found that an experimental drug candidate aimed at combating Alzheimer's disease has a host of unexpected anti-aging effects in animals.

Eating sweets forms memories that may control eating habits, study finds

Eating sweets forms memories that may control eating habits, study finds

ATLANTA--Eating sweet foods causes the brain to form a memory of a meal, according to researchers at Georgia State University, Georgia Regents University and Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center.

The findings, published online in the journal Hippocampus, show that neurons in the dorsal hippocampus, the part of the brain that is critical for episodic memory, are activated by consuming sweets. Episodic memory is the memory of autobiographical events experienced at a particular time and place.

Have an apple-shaped body? You may be more susceptible to binge eating

Women with apple-shaped bodies - those who store more of their fat in their trunk and abdominal regions - may be at particular risk for the development of eating episodes during which they experience a sense of "loss of control," according to a new study from Drexel University. The study also found that women with greater fat stores in their midsections reported being less satisfied with their bodies, which may contribute to loss-of-control eating.

Brain structure may be root of apathy

When brain scientists at Oxford University studied apathy, they didn't expect to see less motivated people making more effort. Their results suggest that for some people traditionally perceived as lazy, it's biology - not attitude - that might be the cause.

A team of neuroscientists at Oxford, funded by The Wellcome Trust, decided to study young people to see if there were any differences in the brains of those who were motivated compared to those who were apathetic.

TGen identifies drug that could limit the spread of deadly brain tumors

PHOENIX, Ariz. -- Nov. 12, 2015 -- In a significant breakthrough, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) has identified a drug, propentofylline or PPF, that could help treat patients with deadly brain cancer.

In a study published today in the Journal of NeuroOncology, TGen researchers report that PPF works to limit the spread of glioblastoma multiforme, or GBM -- the most common primary tumor of the brain and central nervous system -- by targeting a protein called TROY.

Searching for answers in the real world

Researchers from the University of Houston have analyzed brain activity data collected from more than 400 people who viewed an exhibit at the Menil Collection, offering evidence that useable brain data can be collected outside of a controlled laboratory setting. They also reported the first real-world demonstration of what happens in the brain as people observe artwork.

Lead exposure impacts children's sleep

PHILADELPHIA (November 12, 2015) - A new research study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) shows that lead exposure in early childhood are associated with increased risk for sleep problems and excessive daytime sleepiness in later childhood. This is the first longitudinal, population-based study that investigated early lead exposure to sleep problems. The findings are set for publication in the December issue of SLEEP, but can now be found online here.

Researchers trains Watson AI to 'chat,' spark more creativity in humans

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers are exploring and pushing the boundaries of artificial intelligence (AI) by partnering with one of AI's most notable citizens -- IBM's Watson -- to advance how computers could help humans creatively solve problems in a wide variety of professions.

Binghamton University professor develops framework for teaching networks

BINGHAMTON, N.Y. - A framework co-developed by a Binghamton University researcher could help future scientists improve their understanding of all types of networks, from social media channels to beehives.

Hiroki Sayama, director of the Center for Collective Dynamics of Complex Systems and associate professor of systems science and industrial engineering at Binghamton University, co-led a team of over 30 network science researchers, educators, teachers and students to set up a framework that any school can adapt to teach students the concept of a network from the ground up.