Brain

Researchers have identified a region of the genome that regulates vitamin D activation in the kidneys, opening the door for more sophisticated treatments of diseases, including bone and immune disorders, involving vitamin D. The results of this research will be published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain after large stars die in a supernova explosion. The merger is the first cosmological event observed in both gravitational waves--ripples in the fabric of spacetime--and the entire spectrum of light, from gamma rays to radio waves.

More males and people of color are entering nursing, and more nurses are earning bachelor's degrees compared with a decade ago, according to a new study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing researchers.

The study, published in the journal Nursing Outlook, also shows an improvement in working relationships between nurses and physicians.

In 2010, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published "The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health," a milestone report that provided recommendations on how nurses can best advance the nation's health.

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Pregnant women who had low socioeconomic status during childhood and who have poor family social support appear to prematurely age on a cellular level, potentially raising the risk for complications, a new study has found.

Researchers at The Ohio State University examined blood from pregnant women to evaluate the length of telomeres - structures at the end of chromosomes that are used by scientists as a measure of biological (as opposed to chronological) age. Shorter telomeres mean an older cellular age.

Determining how many people live in Seattle, perhaps of a certain age, perhaps from a specific country, is the sort of question that finds its answer in the census, a massive data dump for places across the country.

But just how fresh is that data? After all, the census is updated once a decade, and the U.S. Census Bureau's smaller but more detailed American Community Survey, annually. There's also a delay between when data are collected and when they are published. (The release of data for 2016 started gradually in September 2017.)

SEATTLE - A new scientific study provides the first evidence-based assessment of pandemic potential in Africa prior to outbreaks and identifies ways to prevent them.

Basic mental health training for managers can reap significant benefits for workers' mental wellbeing, a world-first study published today in the prestigious The Lancet Psychiatry suggests.

Led by researchers at the Black Dog Institute and UNSW Sydney, the randomised controlled trial considered the effects of a four-hour mental health training program delivered to managers from Fire & Rescue NSW.

New research led by Kelly Austin, associate professor of sociology at Lehigh, explores unequal exchange in the coffee industry. She cites a range of negative consequences that coffee cultivation contributes to, including: malaria vulnerability, decreased participation in schooling, gender inequalities, and environmental degradation in Bududa, Uganda.

CLEVELAND, Ohio (October 11, 2017) -- Today it seems about everything has been shown to lead to heart disease. Of course smoking is bad for you, as is high blood pressure. There's even mounting evidence that psychosocial factors can cause heart problems. A new study demonstrates how traumatic experiences can affect vascular health and, ultimately, heart disease. The study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, October 11-14.

A proof-of-concept study at North Carolina State University finds participation in dance programs helps students - including those in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines - develop skills such as creativity and persistence that benefited them in the classroom and beyond.