Brain

Middle-age memory decline a matter of changing focus

Middle-age memory decline a matter of changing focus

The inability to remember details, such as the location of objects, begins in early midlife (the 40s) and may be the result of a change in what information the brain focuses on during memory formation and retrieval, rather than a decline in brain function, according to a study by McGill University researchers.

Are brain changes fueling overeating in the obese?

Are brain changes fueling overeating in the obese?

EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Obese mice are much more likely than lean mice to overeat in the presence of environmental cues, a behavior that could be related to changes in the brain, finds a new study by a Michigan State University neuroscientist.

The findings offer clues in Alexander Johnson's quest to unpack the interconnected mechanisms of overeating and obesity. Obesity is an epidemic domestically - more than a third of Americans are considered to be obese - and a growing health problem in other parts of the world.

'Big Data' study discovers earliest sign of Alzheimer's development

'Big Data' study discovers earliest sign of Alzheimer's development

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital have used a powerful tool to better understand the progression of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), identifying its first physiological signs.

Scientists move closer to developing therapeutic window to the brain

Scientists move closer to developing therapeutic window to the brain

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (http://www.ucr.edu) -- Researchers at the University of California, Riverside are bringing their idea for a 'Window to the Brain' transparent skull implant closer to reality through the findings of two studies that are forthcoming in the journals Lasers in Surgery and Medicine and Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine.

Power up: growing neurons undergo major metabolic shift

Power up: growing neurons undergo major metabolic shift

LA JOLLA--Our brains can survive only for a few minutes without oxygen. Salk Institute researchers have now identified the timing of a dramatic metabolic shift in developing neurons, which makes them become dependent on oxygen as a source of energy.

The findings, published July 12 in the journal eLife reveal a metabolic route thought to go awry in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

Study identifies 'book deserts' -- poor neighborhoods lacking children's books -- across country

Study identifies 'book deserts' -- poor neighborhoods lacking children's books -- across country

A study led by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development finds a startling scarcity of children's books in low-income neighborhoods in Detroit, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles.

The lack of children's books was even more pronounced in areas with higher concentrations of poverty, according to the findings published online in the journal Urban Education.

Mathematical models explain east-west asymmetry of jet lag recovery

WASHINGTON, D.C., July 12, 2016 -- Travelers frequently report experiencing a significantly slower jet lag recovery after an eastward vs. westward flight. While some are quick to dismiss this complaint as being "all in their head," new research suggests it may be caused by the oscillation of a certain type of brain cells.

NYU Meyers study on global nurse migration trends

Historically, the United States (U.S.) has been a top receiving country of internationally educated nurses (IEN). These nurses had often worked in areas where there were significant nursing shortages. Therefore, U.S. was seen internationally as a major global contributor to a phenomenon of talent emigration known as nursing "brain drain", where locally educated nurses would go to school only to be seeking employment in the U.S., leaving their home country without adequate nursing talent and resources.

Driving ability of people with cognitive impairment difficult to assess: Research review

TORONTO, July 12, 2016-- No single assessment tool is able to consistently determine driving ability in people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment, a St. Michael's Hospital research review has found.

Individuals with very mild and mild Alzheimer's disease who took a road test had a failure rate of 13.6 and 33.3 per cent respectively, compared to a failure rate of 1.6 per cent in drivers without Alzheimer's disease. However, in general, patients with any degree of Alzheimer's disease still had a pass rate of almost more than 46 per cent.

Genetics play role in character traits related to academic success, study says

AUSTIN, Texas -- Character traits, such as grit or desire to learn, have a heavy hand in academic success and are partially rooted in genetics, according to a psychology study at The University of Texas at Austin.

Though academic achievement is dependent on cognitive abilities, such as logic and reasoning, researchers believe certain personality and character traits can motivate and drive learning.