Brain

Acupuncture normalizes brain structure and damaged neurons following heroin relapse

Acupuncture normalizes brain structure and damaged neurons following heroin relapse

Special function of nestin+ neurons in medial septum-diagonal band of Broca in adult rats

Special function of nestin+ neurons in medial septum-diagonal band of Broca in adult rats

See what a child will look like using automated age-progression software

See what a child will look like using automated age-progression software

It's a guessing game parents like to ponder: What will my child look like when she grows up? A computer could now answer the question in less than a minute.

University of Washington researchers have developed software that automatically generates images of a young child's face as it ages through a lifetime. The technique is the first fully automated approach for aging babies to adults that works with variable lighting, expressions and poses.

Neurofinance study confirms that financial decisions are made on an emotional basis

The willingness of decision makers to take risks increases when they play games of chance with money won earlier. Risk taking also rises when they have the opportunity to compensate for earlier losses by breaking even. This outcome was demonstrated by Dr. Kaisa Hytönen, a Finnish Aalto University researcher in neurofinance, together with her international colleagues.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder may reflect a propensity for bad habits

Brainy courage of the rainbowfish

The boldest black-lined rainbowfish are those that are born in the wild. Also more fearless are those that analyze information both sides of their brains. This is the conclusion of Australian researchers Culum Brown and Anne-Laurence Bibost from Macquarie University, in a study published in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.

Head injuries can make children loners

New research has found that a child's relationships may be a hidden casualty long after a head injury.

Neuroscientists at Brigham Young University studied a group of children three years after each had suffered a traumatic brain injury – most commonly from car accidents. The researchers found that lingering injury in a specific region of the brain predicted the health of the children's social lives.

There's no faking it -- your sexual partner knows if you're really satisfied

There is no point faking it in bed because chances are your sexual partner will be able to tell. A study by researchers at the University of Waterloo found that men and women are equally perceptive of their partners' levels of sexual satisfaction.

The study by Erin Fallis, PhD candidate, and co-authors Professor Uzma S. Rehman and Professor Christine Purdon in the Department of Psychology at Waterloo, identified sexual communication and ability to recognize emotions as important factors that predict accuracy in gauging one partner's sexual satisfaction.

Study confirms impact of clinician-patient relationship on health outcomes

Age does not predict success for those in court-based mental health treatment programs