Brain

Study suggests hatha yoga boosts brain function in older adults

Study suggests hatha yoga boosts brain function in older adults

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Practicing hatha yoga three times a week for eight weeks improved sedentary older adults' performance on cognitive tasks that are relevant to everyday life, researchers report.

The findings involved 108 adults between the ages of 55 and 79 years of age, 61 of whom attended hatha yoga classes. The others met for the same number and length of sessions and engaged in stretching and toning exercises instead of yoga.

Ultrasound imaging of chitosan nerve conduits that bridge sciatic nerve defects in rats

Ultrasound imaging of chitosan nerve conduits that bridge sciatic nerve defects in rats

Myc inhibition is an effective therapeutic strategy against most aggressive brain tumors

Myc inhibition is an effective therapeutic strategy against most aggressive brain tumors

Cholecystokinin octapeptide antagonizes apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells

Cholecystokinin octapeptide antagonizes apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial cells

GW researchers develop model to study impact of faculty development programs

WASHINGTON (Aug. 18, 2014) — Methods used to demonstrate the impact of faculty development programs have long been lacking. A research report from the George Washington University (GW) introduces a new model to demonstrate how faculty development programming can affect institutional behaviors, beyond the individual participant.

Visual 'gist' helps us figure out where a crowd is looking

Have you ever seen a crowd of people looking off into the distance, perhaps toward a passing biker or up to the top of a building? There's a good chance you looked there, too, instantly, even without paying attention to the individuals in the group. How can we tell where a crowd is looking with so little effort?

An inside-out vein graft filled with PRP for repair of a short sciatic nerve defect

HSP72 confers protection in retinal ganglion cells and lateral geniculate nucleus neurons

DNA methylation involved in Alzheimer's disease

Boston, MA – A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) and Rush University Medical Center, reveals how early changes in brain DNA methylation are involved in Alzheimer's disease. DNA methylation is a biochemical alteration of the building blocks of DNA and is one of the markers that indicate whether the DNA is open and biologically active in a given region of the human genome.

The study is published online August 17, 2014 in Nature Neuroscience.

Epigenetic breakthrough bolsters understanding of Alzheimer's disease

A team led by researchers at the University of Exeter Medical School and King's College London has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer's disease.

Epigenetic changes affect the expression or activity of genes without changing the underlying DNA sequence and are believed to be one mechanism by which the environment can interact with the genome. Importantly, epigenetic changes are potentially reversible and may therefore provide targets for the development of new therapies.