Brain

New insights uncovered into Prader-Willi syndrome

New insights uncovered into Prader-Willi syndrome

A study published in the journal Human Molecular Genetics by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) provides novel insights into the brain mechanisms underlying the insatiable hunger and subsequent obesity in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome.

Even when help is just a click away, stigma is still a roadblock

Even when help is just a click away, stigma is still a roadblock

AMES, Iowa - Stigma is a major barrier preventing people with mental health issues from getting the help they need. Even in a private and anonymous setting online, someone with greater self-stigma is less likely to take that first step to get information about mental health concerns and counseling, according to a new Iowa State University study.

Researchers uncover how environmental pollutant dioxin alters brain development in mice

Researchers uncover how environmental pollutant dioxin alters brain development in mice

Tsukuba, Japan - Dioxins are environmental pollutants that stay in the body for long periods of time because they can accumulate in fat tissue. They are mainly by-products of combustion and industrial processes. Long-term exposure to dioxins has been suspected to have a host of toxicities, causing health issues such as cancer and impairment of the immune system and the developing nervous system.

Helping co-workers can wear you out

Helping co-workers can wear you out

EAST LANSING, Mich. -- Helping your coworkers too often can lead to mental and emotional exhaustion and hurt your job performance, a new study suggests.

Reporting in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Michigan State University's Russell Johnson and colleagues say the depletion effects were especially strong for employees with high "pro-social motivation" - or those who care deeply about the welfare of others.

While previous research on helping has focused largely on the effects of the beneficiaries, this is one of the first studies to focus on the helpers.

Alcohol dependent individuals show greater risk of suicide in evening hours

DARIEN, IL - A new study found that there is a circadian pattern of peak and nadir in the incidence of suicides committed in alcohol dependent individuals.

Subjects who consumed heavy amounts of alcohol had a peak incidence of suicide at 9PM, and a low around 5PM. In contrast, the peak incidence was around 12 PM for those individuals who did not drink or drank moderately and a low at 4 AM.

Childhood abuse, parental death and divorce are linked to adult insomnia symptoms

DARIEN, IL - According to a new study, child adversities, which are known to play an important role in mental and physical health, are also associated with poor sleep.

Child abuse, parental divorce and parental death, where shown to be associated with higher rates of adult insomnia. Mild insomnia was uniquely predicted by childhood abuse and divorce, and moderate-severe insomnia was uniquely predicated by childhood abuse and parental death.

Consistent links between capacity to delay gratification and ADHD, obesity

Hamilton, Ont. (June 14, 2016) - Two new studies led by researchers at McMaster University and St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton have found that individuals diagnosed with ADHD or obesity are more likely to choose smaller immediate rewards over larger future rewards.

This reduced capacity to delay gratification in many individuals diagnosed with ADHD or obesity may lead to new approaches for the clinical treatment of these conditions.

Senior moments explained: Older adults have weaker clutter control

A new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology finds that older people struggle to remember important details because their brains can't resist the irrelevant "stuff" they soak up subconsciously. As a result, they tend to be less confident in their memories.

Empathy for others' pain rooted in cognition rather than sensation, CU-Boulder study finds

The ability to understand and empathize with others' pain is grounded in cognitive neural processes rather than sensory ones, according to the results of a new study led by University of Colorado Boulder researchers.

The findings show that the act of perceiving others' pain (i.e., empathy for others' pain) does not appear to involve the same neural circuitry as experiencing pain in one's own body, suggesting that they are different interactions within the brain.

Oxytocin in the recognition of emotions

Oxytoxin, whether functioning as a hormone or a neurotransmitter, is involved in a series of important physiological and psychological functions. For example, it promotes maternal attachment, lactation, pair bonding and group cohesion. However, the picture is actually far more complex, just think that it can sometimes even lead to aggressive behaviour.

Experimental results also show that intranasal administration (with a spray) of oxytocin makes people more willing to take care of others and better at recognizing emotions.