Brain

Newly discovered brain cells explain a prosocial effect of oxytocin

Newly discovered brain cells explain a prosocial effect of oxytocin

Oxytocin, the body's natural love potion, helps couples fall in love, makes mothers bond with their babies, and encourages teams to work together. Now new research at Rockefeller University reveals a mechanism by which this prosocial hormone has its effect on interactions between the sexes, at least in certain situations. The key, it turns out, is a newly discovered class of brain cells.

Hunger games: How brain 'browns' fat to aid in weight loss

Hunger games: How brain 'browns' fat to aid in weight loss

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have uncovered a molecular process in the brain known to control eating that transforms white fat into brown fat. This process impacts how much energy we burn and how much weight we can lose. The results are published in the Oct. 9 issue of the journal Cell.

Stanford team invents sensor that uses radio waves to detect subtle changes in pressure

Stanford team invents sensor that uses radio waves to detect subtle changes in pressure

Stanford engineers have invented a wireless pressure sensor that has already been used to measure brain pressure in lab mice with brain injuries.

The underlying technology has such broad potential that it could one day be used to create skin-like materials that can sense pressure, leading to prosthetic devices with the electronic equivalent of a sense of touch.

A nine-member research team led by Chemical Engineering Professor Zhenan Bao detailed two medical applications of this technology in Nature Communications.

An enzyme and synaptic plasticity

An enzyme and synaptic plasticity

Multiple neurodevelopmental disorders have a common molecular cause

Oxytocin: How the 'love hormone' regulates sexual behavior

Oxytocin has been called the "love hormone" because it plays an important role in social behaviors, such as maternal care and pair bonding. In a study published by Cell Press on October 9th in the journal Cell, researchers uncover oxytocin-responsive brain cells that are necessary for female social interest in male mice during estrus—the sexually receptive phase of their cycle. These neurons, found in the prefrontal cortex, may play a role in other oxytocin-related social behaviors such as intimacy, love, or mother-child bonding.

Parental misconceptions about concussions could hinder treatment and recovery

SAN DIEGO – With football season in full swing, there's no shortage of talk about young players — from high school down to the pee wee levels — suffering from concussions. Yet many parents may lack knowledge about this mild traumatic brain injury, according to two studies to be presented Friday, Oct. 10 at a pre-conference symposium on pediatric sports medicine at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition in San Diego.

Mechanism that repairs brain after stroke discovered

A previously unknown mechanism through which the brain produces new nerve cells after a stroke has been discovered at Lund University and Karolinska Institute in Sweden. The findings have been published in the journal SCIENCE.

The specific receptor targeted by naltrexone to enhance diabetic wound closure is OGFr

In-home visits reduce drug use, depression in pregnant teens

Intensive parenting and health education provided in homes of pregnant American Indian teens reduced the mothers' illegal drug use, depression and behavior problems, and set their young children on track to meet behavioral and emotional milestones they may have otherwise missed.