Brain

Medications for patients with first episode psychosis may not meet guidelines

Medications for patients with first episode psychosis may not meet guidelines

Many patients with first-episode psychosis receive medications that do not comply with recommended guidelines for first-episode treatment, researchers have found. Current guidelines emphasize low doses of antipsychotic drugs and strategies for minimizing the side effects that might contribute to patients stopping their medication. A study finds that almost 40 percent of people with first-episode psychosis in community mental health clinics across the country might benefit from medication treatment changes.

New study shows computer-based approach to treating anxiety may reduce suicide risk

New study shows computer-based approach to treating anxiety may reduce suicide risk

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- A group of psychology researchers at Florida State University have developed a simple computer-based approach to treating anxiety sensitivity, something that could have major implications for veterans and other groups who are considered at risk for suicide.

Birds conform to local 'traditions'

Birds conform to local 'traditions'

Birds learn new foraging techniques by observing others in their social network, 'copycat' behaviour that can sustain foraging 'traditions' that last years, according to a study of how innovations spread and persist in wild great tits (Parus major).

Barrier-breaking drug may lead to spinal cord injury treatments

Barrier-breaking drug may lead to spinal cord injury treatments

The ISP drug did not cause spinal cord axons known to control movements to cross the scar and reconnect with brain neurons above the injury site. Dr. Silver and his colleagues think this means the ISP-induced sprouting helped the rats recover by increasing the signal sent by the few remaining intact axons.

"This is very promising. We now have an agent that may work alone or in combination with other treatments to improve the lives of many," said Dr. Silver. He and his colleagues are seeking to test the ISP drug in preclinical trials.

Citizen science increases environmental awareness, advocacy

DURHAM, N.C. -- Citizens who get involved in science become more environmentally aware and willing to participate in advocacy than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment. Citizen science projects can lead to broader public support for conservation efforts.

NJ brain injury researchers find retrieval practice improves memory in youth with TBI

Scientists concerned that culture of research can hinder scientific endeavor

Aspects of the culture of research in UK higher education institutions (HEIs) can encourage poor research practices and hinder the production of high quality science, according to scientists who took part in a project exploring the ethical consequences of the culture of research led by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics.

Check less to reduce email stress

Is your inbox burning you out? Then take heart - research from the University of British Columbia suggests that easing up on email checking can help reduce psychological stress.

Some of the study's 124 adults -- including students, financial analysts medical professionals and others -- were instructed to limit checking email to three times daily for a week. Others were told to check email as often as they could (which turned out to be about the same number of times that they normally checked their email prior to the study).

Peptide shows great promise for treating spinal cord injury

Case Western Reserve scientists have developed a new chemical compound that shows extraordinary promise in restoring function lost to spinal cord injury. The compound, which the researchers dubbed intracellular sigma peptide (ISP), allowed paralyzed muscles to activate in more than 80 percent of the animals tested. The remarkable study, partly funded by the National Institutes of Health, appears in the December 3 edition of the journal Nature.

3-D compass in the brain

Pilots are trained to guard against vertigo: a sudden loss of the sense of vertical direction that renders them unable to tell "up" from "down" and sometimes even leads to crashes. Coming up out of a subway station can produce similar confusion: For a few moments, you are unsure which way to go, until regaining your sense of direction. In both cases, the disorientation is thought to be caused by a temporary malfunction of a brain circuit that operates as a three-dimensional (3D) compass.