Brain

Mindfulness could help provide good sleep as we age

Mindfulness could help provide good sleep as we age

Getting a good night’s sleep can be challenging, especially as we age. About half of all older adults report sleeping difficulties. This can make them more likely to experience physical or mental health conditions, memory problems, and falls, due to poor balance.

Brain cancer: Modules that Regulate Glioblastoma Genes

Brain cancer: Modules that Regulate Glioblastoma Genes

Researchers have shown for the first time a pyramid hierarchical network of “coherent gene modules” that regulate glioblastoma genes, involved in a highly aggressive form of brain cancer.

By identifying the most important gene modules responsible for cancer growth and proliferation, the study informs a strategy that could elucidate these modules at the top levels of their network, and in turn be used to identify new drug therapies.

Brain tumor patients fare better with private insurance

Once upon a time it was believed that greedy insurance companies were bad for patients - now they are a sign of the have's and have nots. A new analysis in Neurosurgery finds that brain tumor patients with private insurance have fewer medical complications and thus are in the hospital less than those who are on Medicaid or were uninsured between 2002 and 2011.

Wanting and Having Sex - How The Brain Is Involved

A new review looks at how the brain impacts the sequence of physical and emotional changes that occur as a person participates in sexually stimulating activities.

Experts note that the cerebral cortex region of the brain is involved in all three phases of the sexual pleasure cycle—wanting sex, having sex, and inhibiting sex—and each of these phases depends on distinct networks within the brain. It’s also clear that alterations in these brain networks are associated with sexual dysfunction.

Time to 'just say no' to behavior-calming drugs for Alzheimer patients

ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- Doctors write millions of prescriptions a year for drugs to calm the behavior of people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia. But non-drug approaches actually work better, and carry far fewer risks, experts conclude in a new report.

In fact, non-drug approaches should be the first choice for treating dementia patients' common symptoms such as irritability, agitation, depression, anxiety, sleep problems, aggression, apathy and delusions, say the researchers in a paper just published by the British Medical Journal.

Alzheimer's amyloid clumps found in young adult brains

Amyloid -- an abnormal protein whose accumulation in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease -- starts accumulating inside neurons of people as young as 20, a much younger age than scientists ever imagined, reports a surprising new Northwestern Medicine study.

Scientists believe this is the first time amyloid accumulation has been shown in such young human brains. It's long been known that amyloid accumulates and forms clumps of plaque outside neurons in aging adults and in Alzheimer's.

Study challenges theory on unconscious memory system, links hippocampus to unconscious memory

A new study by a UT Dallas researcher challenges a long-accepted scientific theory about the role the hippocampus plays in our unconscious memory.

For decades, scientists have theorized that this part of the brain is not involved in processing unconscious memory, the type that allows us to do things like button a shirt without having to think about it.

But research by Dr. Richard Addante, a senior lecturer in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, raises doubts about that.

Research suggests anesthetics could have long-term impact on children's brains

A group of anesthesiologists and toxicologists today issued a caution to parents and health care professionals about the use of general anesthetics in children.

EEGs predict a film's success better than surveys

75 percent of movies earn a net loss during their run in theaters. A new study finds that brain activity visible through electroencephalography (EEG) measures may be a much cheaper and more accurate way to predict the commercial success of movies.

How brain waves guide memory formation

Our brains generate a constant hum of activity: As neurons fire, they produce brain waves that oscillate at different frequencies. Long thought to be merely a byproduct of neuron activity, recent studies suggest that these waves may play a critical role in communication between different parts of the brain.