Brain

ANN ARBOR, MI - The dental health of middle-aged Americans faces a lot of problems right now, and an uncertain future to come, according to new results from the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging.

A Dartmouth study finds that Americans are consistently less supportive of refugee resettlement within their own communities than nationally, illustrating the prevalence of not-in-my-backyard syndrome (NIMBYism). The manner in which the media links refugee issues to national security concerns was also found to affect public support for resettlement. The findings are published in Science Advances.

LOWELL, Mass. - Three-quarters of fans say head injuries in football are a major problem and another six in 10 are worried about off-field violence involving players. Despite that, football remains America's favorite professional sport, according to results of a UMass Lowell-Washington Post poll released today.

Annapolis, MD; September 6, 2017--As an entomologist with an artistic flair, Carly Tribull, Ph.D., frequently uses a novel approach for conveying science to non-academic audiences: comics.

LAWRENCE -- A paper appearing recently in the peer-reviewed journal Comprehensive Psychiatry details a "radical" new method for diagnosing eating disorders that predicts 68 percent of people's problems in psychological and social functioning due to eating-disorder features.

By contrast, the method of identifying eating disorders outlined by the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-5) traditionally used by clinicians predicts slightly less than 10 percent of impairment in psychological and social functioning.

A better understanding of how a key chemical messenger acts in the brain could lead to a radical shift in psychiatric care, according to a new research paper.

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter which helps brain cells communicate with one another, playing important roles in stabilising mood and regulating stress.

Despite its importance, current models to explain serotonin's function in the brain remain incomplete.

Researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered a process through which changes in nutrition during early mouse pregnancy lead to offspring that develop schizophrenic-like symptoms as adults. Published in Translational Psychiatry, the study shows how deprivation of two polyunsaturated fatty acids during early gestation can have long lasting effects on offspring through specific epigenetic changes in gene expression.

In recent years unauthorized immigrants known as "dreamers" have captured nationwide attention and become a force in American politics. Brought to the United States as children, these young adults came forward to ask for the right to give back to the country they call home. With protection from deportation, they say, comes the ability to pursue higher education and forge careers, to move from fear and uncertainty to planning a future with purpose.

August 31, 2017 - Ongoing advances in understanding the functional connections within the brain are producing exciting insights into how the brain circuits function together to support human behavior--and may lead to new discoveries in the development and treatment of psychiatric disorders, according to a review and update in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

COLUMBIA, Mo. - Hurricane Harvey is the most recent natural disaster that has caused damage and destruction across many communities. When disasters strike an entire community, they do not affect all community members equally, and victims of domestic violence are often particularly vulnerable. Researchers at the University of Missouri have now identified a framework that can help victims of domestic violence before, during and after disaster events.