Brain

Experimental therapy halts treatment-resistant brain tumors

Experimental therapy halts treatment-resistant brain tumors

CINCINNATI - Researchers report in the journal Cancer Cell an experimental therapy that in laboratory tests on human cells and mouse models stops aggressive, treatment-resistant and deadly brain cancers called glioblastoma and high-grade gliomas.

A multi-institutional team led by researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center publishes their results on May 9.

Machine learning accelerates the discovery of new materials

Machine learning accelerates the discovery of new materials

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 9, 2016--Researchers recently demonstrated how an informatics-based adaptive design strategy, tightly coupled to experiments, can accelerate the discovery of new materials with targeted properties, according to a recent paper published in Nature Communications.

Reading an opponent's face gives the edge in martial arts

There's more to excelling in the martial arts combat sport of taekwondo than just being able to produce well-aimed kicks or punches. A participant's skill at reading the emotions on an opponent's face and to therefore anticipate his or her next move can mean the difference between winning and losing a sparring match. This is according to Yu-Ling Shih and Chia-Yen Lin of the National Taiwan University of Sport.

Opinions on fracking linked to political persuasion, says new study

New research by a team including Plymouth University indicates how influential a person's political affinity is to their opinion about hydraulic fracking.

Yaniv Hanoch, Professor of Decision Science in Plymouth University's School of Psychology, co-authored the study alongside Dr Becky Choma and Shannon Currie from Ryerson University. The researchers examined the role of people's political ideology in people's attitude, knowledge, and perceptions about hydraulic fracking.

Study shows where you are is who you are

A recent study suggests that who we are might be more integrated with where we are than previously thought. Demonstrating how architects and urban planners might take guidance from disciplines like neuroscience, philosophy and psychology, a paper published in Frontiers in Psychology, reveals that a good built environment might promote well-being and effect our decisions.

Delayed concussion reporting may sideline college athletes for several more days

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- Athletes who wait to report a concussion may experience longer recovery times, say University of Florida researchers who found that college players who delayed treatment or removal from play missed an average of five more days of play than athletes who immediately reported concussion symptoms.

The study appears in the May issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

New data on brain network activity can help in understanding 'cognitive vulnerability' to depression

May 9, 2016 - Neuroimaging studies of interconnected brain networks may provide the "missing links" between behavioral and biological models of cognitive vulnerability to depression, according to a research review in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Digital media may be changing how you think

Tablet and laptop users beware. Using digital platforms such as tablets and laptops for reading may make you more inclined to focus on concrete details rather than interpreting information more abstractly, according to a new study published in the proceedings of ACM CHI '16, the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, to be held May 7-12, 2016. The findings serve as another wake-up call to how digital media may be affecting our likelihood of using abstract thought.

Scientists are first to discover sensory system that detects air humidity

Humidity can make us feel miserable -- think of sultry summer days in Chicago, for example -- but humans do not have dedicated sensory systems in the skin to detect water vapor in the air. Most insects, for whom humidity levels can mean life or death, do have such systems, but little has been known about how they work.

Gene linked to Alzheimer's disease impairs memory by disrupting brain's 'playback system'

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have discovered how the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease causes memory impairment. A specific type of brain activity important for memory replay is disrupted in mice with the E4 version of the apolipoprotein E (apoE4) gene, which may interfere with memory formation.