Brain

Many different countries have a tea culture, and Japanese Matcha tea is growing in popularity around the world. In Japan, Matcha has a long history of being used for various medicinal purposes. It has been suspected to have various beneficial effects to health, but relatively little scientific evidence supported that claim. Now, a group of Japanese researchers from Kumamoto University has shown that anxious behavior in mice is reduced after consuming Matcha powder or Matcha extract.

New evidence suggests that adolescent bullying and victimization may have origins in the home. Many bullies have parents who are hostile, punitive and rejecting. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Charles E. Schmidt College of Science, Concordia University in Montreal, Canada, and Uppsala University in Sweden, have identified another type of parenting that contributes to peer difficulties: those who direct derision and contempt at their children.

For the last quarter century, researchers have been asking whether genetic information might have negative psychosocial effects. Anxiety, depression, disrupted relationships, and heightened stigmatization have all been posited as possible outcomes--but not consistently found. What accounts for the discrepancy?

Boredom is a common human experience. But how people cope with or handle being bored is important for mental health.

"Everybody experiences boredom," said Sammy Perone, Washington State University assistant professor in the Department of Human Development. "But some people experience it a lot, which is unhealthy. So, we wanted to look at how to deal with it effectively."

The brains of people who are prone to boredom react differently, compared to those who don't, Perone and his colleagues found in a new paper recently published in the journal Psychophysiology.

Quitting alcohol may improve health-related quality of life for women, especially their mental well-being, according to a study from Hong Kong published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

"More evidence suggests caution in recommending moderate drinking as part of a healthy diet," says Dr. Michael Ni, School of Public Health and The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, University of Hong Kong (HKU).

The positive effects of a rich home learning environment during a child's early years continue into adolescence and help improve test scores later in life, according to a new study published in School Effectiveness and School Improvement.

This research shows pre-schoolers whose parents regularly read and talked about books with them scored better on math tests at age 12. The study, lead by Dr Simone Lehrl of the University of Bamberg, is one of the first to provide detail on the importance of early years home learning on children's development up to early adolescence.

A strain of the common cold virus has been found to potentially target, infect and destroy cancer cells in patients with bladder cancer, a new study in the medical journal Clinical Cancer Research reports. No trace of the cancer was found in one patient following treatment with the virus.

Unique analysis of US county-level data finds a strong association between incarceration and drug-mortality, and economic hardship and drug-mortality, independent of opioid prescription rates

County-level incarceration may provide a further, plausible explanation to the underlying geographic variations in US drug-mortality, with the highest incarceration rates linked with a more than 50% increase in drug-mortality compared to counties with lowest incarceration

Although we know that exercise improves anxiety and mood problems in younger people with cancer, few studies have looked at the effects of exercise on older adults with cancer. Since most new cancer cases occur in adults aged 60 or older, a team of researchers from the University of Rochester Medical Center and other institutions designed a study to learn more.

Their study appeared in the June issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS).

New findings show that old-growth forests, a critical nesting habitat for threatened northern spotted owls, are less likely to experience high-severity fire than young-growth forests during wildfires. This suggests that old-growth forest could be leveraged to provide valuable fire refuges that support forest biodiversity and buffer the extreme effects of climate change on fire regimes in the Pacific Northwest.

In the near future, we will be able to mass-produce meat directly from animal cells.

This cultured meat could change the world - or it could falter like GM 'frankenfoods'.

Writing in Frontiers in Nutrition, researchers warn that the most common media framing of cultured meat - as a 'high-tech' innovation - may be the least effective in garnering consumer acceptance.

The revolution will be televised

Smoking is killing at least 17 Australians a day from preventable heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular conditions, new research led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found.

The study, the most in-depth in the world, shows for the first time how smoking harms all of the cardiovascular system - the heart and major blood vessels.

Lead researcher, Professor Emily Banks from the ANU National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, said the study examined the impact of smoking for every possible cardiovascular disease.

EAST LANSING, Mich. - Racial disparity in special education is growing, and it's more complex than previously thought. New research from Michigan State University examined how often black and Hispanic students are identified as needing special education compared to white students, leading to new findings on disproportionality and racial gaps.

As the authors posit, contemporary pedagogical ideas and approaches cannot fully satisfy the existing graduate requirements because of rapid informatization, intellectualization and technological progress.

According to the existing data, graduates have to acquire over a half of their professional skills after leaving their institutions. Their employers need to offer advanced training to them, and mentoring is one of the optimal ways to do that.

Baltimore, MD--How do the communities of microbes living in our gastrointestinal systems affect our health? Carnegie's Will Ludington was part of a team that helped answer this question.

For nearly a century, evolutionary biologists have probed how genes encode an individual's chances for success--or fitness--in a specific environment.