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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Desert bighorn sheep are crossing Interstate 40 in California

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Desert bighorn sheep are able to climb steep, rocky terrain with speed and agility. New research shows that they can cross a four-lane highway.
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Preterm newborns sleep better in NICU while hearing their mother's voice

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Hearing a recording of their mother's voice may help neonates maintain sleep while in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to preliminary data from a new study.
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Colorado study suggests new combination treatment against relapsed head and neck cancer

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
'EphB4-ephrin-B2 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials in other disease settings, and our work shows that it might be successful in combination with EGFR inhibition in advanced head and neck cancers as well,' says Sana Karam, M.D., Ph.D.
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How do you weigh a galaxy? Especially the one you're in?

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
A new technique promises more reliable estimates of the masses of galaxies, according to a paper published in the Astrophysical Journal. The study is the first to combine full 3-D motions of several of the Milky Way's satellite galaxies with computer simulations to constrain the mass of the Milky Way.
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Transparent, conductive films promising for developing flexible screens

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Because silver is less brittle and more chemically resistant than materials currently used to make these electrodes, the new films could offer a high-performance and long-lasting option for use with flexible screens and electronics. The silver-based films could also enable flexible solar cells for installation on windows, roofs and even personal devices.
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Social media images of culture can predict economic trends in cities

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
A vibrant arts, music and science culture -- as measured by images posted to social media site Flickr -- successfully predicted the economic rise of certain neighborhoods in London and New York City. The model could even anticipate gentrification by five years. With more than half of the world's population living in cities, such information could help policymakers ensure human wellbeing in dense urban settings.
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New research identifies how blind cavefish lose their eyes

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Blind cavefish (Astyanax mexicanus) lose critical eye tissues within a few days after their eyes begin to develop. According to a new study, this loss of eye tissues happens through epigenetic silencing of eye-related genes. The researchers identified roles for more than two dozen genes that are shared by humans--most of which have been implicated in various human eye disorders.
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Tumultuous galaxy mergers better at switching on black holes

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
A new study by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder finds that violent crashes may be more effective at activating black holes than more peaceful mergers.
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Drug combination offers more effective care for patients suffering miscarriage

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
A combination of the drugs mifepristone and misoprostol can help bring closure to some women and their families suffering from miscarriage, and reduces the need for surgical intervention to complete the painful miscarriage process. Results of a new clinical trial show that while the standard drug regimen using misoprostol on its own frequently fails to complete the miscarriage, a combination of misoprostol and the drug mifepristone works much more reliably.
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Most clinical trial participants find benefits of sharing personal data outweigh risks

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Most participants in clinical trials believe the benefits of broadly sharing person-level data outweigh the risks, according to a new study by Stanford University researchers.
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Is a stress shot on the horizon?

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Rats immunized weekly for three weeks with beneficial bacteria showed increased levels of anti-inflammatory proteins in the brain, more resilience to the physical effects of stress, and less anxiety-like behavior. If replicated in humans, researchers say the findings could lead to novel microbiome-based immunizations for mood disorders like anxiety and PTSD.
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Targeting strategy may open door to better cancer drug delivery

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Bioengineers may be able to use the unique mechanical properties of diseased cells, such as metastatic cancer cells, to help improve delivery of drug treatments to the targeted cells, according to a team of researchers at Penn State.
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Impact of fishing gear entanglement deduced from whale hormone levels

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
New validation study analyzing hormone profile shows the duration and negative effects of fishing gear entanglement on the North Atlantic right whale -- one of the most endangered whale species. Providing information on foraging success, migration behavior and body functioning, this technique can be used to study other baleen species to understand the impact of fishing activity on threatened whale populations.
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Poor sleep linked to lower cognitive functioning in people with diabetes and prediabetes

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
A study published in the journal Acta Diabetologica reports that people with diabetes and prediabetes who have lower sleep efficiency -- a measure of how much time in bed is actually spent sleeping -- have poorer cognitive function than those with better sleep efficiency.
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Fungicide impairs silk production, according to study

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
By testing an agrochemical designed to increase resistance on the mulberry plants used to feed silkworms, a research verified a rise in caterpillars' mortality and reduction in the size of cocoons. Intensive use of pesticides in monoculture systems may be the cause of silkworm crop losses in Brazil.
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Lab-grown neurons improve breathing in mice after spinal cord injury

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
In a pre-clinical study, researchers show that V2a interneurons could one day help paralyzed patients breathe without a ventilator.
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California's other gold

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Sea urchin roe is an acquired taste. Served as sushi, uni -- the Japanese word for this delicacy -- is actually the reproductive organ of the sea urchin. One of the most highly valued coastal fisheries in California is the red sea urchin (Mesocentrotus franciscanus), found in the Pacific Ocean from Alaska to Baja California. Red sea urchins are sold to processors who determine the price of each uni batch based on its quality -- a function of its size, shape, texture and color (usually orange to yellow).
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Want narcissists to donate to your cause? Make it about them

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
When narcissistic individuals are able to imagine themselves in a victim's situation, they are more likely to donate to charity, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
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Black, Hispanic people may be more likely to have a second hemorrhagic stroke than whites

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Black and Hispanic people may be more likely to have another intracerebral hemorrhage, or a stroke caused by bleeding in the brain, than white people, according to a study published in the June 6, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Emergency physicians debunk 'dry drowning' myths, highlight drowning risk in older swimmers

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Parents have been reading -- and sharing -- alarming reports of children who died or nearly died due to "dry drowning" over the past year. However, the use of that incorrect, nonmedical term has contributed to confusion about the true dangers of drowning in children and led to serious and fatal conditions being ignored after a 'dry drowning' diagnosis was made, according to a special report in the June issue of Emergency Medicine News, published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
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