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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Updated: 29 min 40 sec ago

How stem cells move

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Scientists from Newcastle University have shown that human embryonic stem cells move by travelling back and forth in a line, much like ants moving along their trails.
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Research reveals secret to whale shark hotspots

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
A study has uncovered the secret to why endangered whale sharks gather on mass at just a handful of locations around the world.
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'Supersized alcopops' pose unique danger to youth

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
College students seriously underestimate the effects of drinking a new class of beverages being marketed across the country, according to a new George Mason University study. 'Supersized alcopops' -- sweet, colorful and fizzy drinks that have been shown to appeal to youth -- now contain almost as much alcohol as a six-pack of beer in a single can, and young drinkers don't know how much these drinks can affect them.
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Antioxidants developed by MSU scientists slow down senescence in plants

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
A team from the Faculty of Biology, MSU tested on plants mitochondria-targeted antioxidants developed in the university lab under the guidance of Academician Vladimir Skulachev. The tests showed slowdown of senescence processes and inhibition of cell death. The study was published in the Mitochondrion journal.
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Thorny life of new-born neurons

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
The hippocampus is a critical region in the brain for learning and memory. For the first time, scientists have observed how stimulation causes the spines on its neuronal dendrites to enlarge.
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Cooling by laser beam

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
A laser pulse that for a few picoseconds transforms a material into a high-temperature superconductor. Different experiments have unveiled this interesting phenomenon, with potential applicative implications. Research carried out by SISSA scientists a year ago had already provided several basic principles of the phenomenon. A new study published on "Physical Review Letters" now clarifies other important aspects.
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Water users associations approve remote control watering systems

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Researchers at the University of Cordoba assess the success or failure of installing remote control systems and data measuring in water users associations.
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Temple researchers reverse cognitive impairments in mice with dementia

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Reversing memory deficits and impairments in spatial learning is a major goal in dementia research. A lack of knowledge about cellular pathways critical to the development of dementia has prevented significant clinical advance. Researchers at Temple's Lewis Katz School of Medicine are breaking through that barrier. They show, for the first time in an animal model, that a drug can reverse tau pathology -- the second-most important lesion in the brain in patients with Alzheimer's.
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Coral tricks for adapting to ocean acidification

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
A molecular process that signals distress could also help corals adapt to climate change.
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Food allergies connected to children with autism spectrum disorder

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
A new study from the University of Iowa and published by the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more than twice as likely to suffer from a food allergy than children who do not have ASD.
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Are antibiotics overused in treatment of outpatient acute respiratory infections?

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Antibiotics are most commonly prescribed for acute respiratory infections, although most of these infections are caused by viruses for which antibiotics aren't effective. A new study found that among almost 15,000 outpatients with acute respiratory infections during flu seasons, 41 percent of outpatients were prescribed antibiotics and 41 percent of them had diagnoses for which antibiotics weren't indicated. The results suggest antibiotic overuse remains widespread in the treatment of outpatient acute respiratory infections.
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Association of food allergy, other allergies with autism spectrum disorder

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Food and other types of allergies are more likely to be reported in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) than in children without ASD but the underlying reasons for this association aren't clear.
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The burglary microbiome project

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Researchers have demonstrated that microbial signatures, the unique microbial make-up of each individual, from the built environment can identify persons involved in crimes occurring in the home, such as burglaries. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga.
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ARS scientists are working to ensure safe waterways in Georgia

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Scientists with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) are developing ways to identify the sources of any potentially harmful bacteria found in the surface waters around Athens, Georgia. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga.
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Bone apetit: How bacteria eat bone to sustain invasive infection

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center have determined the metabolic pathway that Staphylococcus aureus use to survive in bones. Invasive S. aureus infections frequently occur in the bone and are notoriously resistant to antimicrobial therapy. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11 in Atlanta, Ga.
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Increased safety in diagnosing cardiac infarction with more sensitive analytical method

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Five percent more cardiac infarctions detected and 11 percent fewer patients suffering a relapse. That is the result of a study of more than 80,000 patients in which two cardiac damage markers (conventional troponin and the newer, high-sensitive troponin T) were compared with each other.
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New way to predict caries progression

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
A team of researchers form Russia discovered that an increase in the concentration of several substances in oral fluid can serve as the indication of caries development. Using this data they found a way to prevent the disease in its early stages. The study was supported by a grant from the Russian Science Foundation (RSF). The results of the study were published in the EPMA Journal.
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Nano-saturn

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
Saturn is the second largest planet in our solar system and has a characteristic ring. Japanese researchers have now synthesized a molecular 'nano-Saturn'. As the scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it consists of a spherical C(60) fullerene as the planet and a flat macrocycle made of six anthracene units as the ring. The structure is confirmed by spectroscopic and X-ray analyses.
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New method helps make orthotopic brain-tumor imaging clearer and faster

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
A research team led by Prof. ZHENG Hairong from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. LIU Bin from the University of Singapore, reported the first NIR-II fluorescent molecule with aggregation-induced-emission (AIE) characteristics for dual fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging.
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Virtual brain gives insights into memory deficits in depression

Jun 08 2018 - 00:06
During a depressive episode the ability of the brain to form new brain cells is reduced. Scientists of the Ruhr-Universität Bochum examined how this affects the memory with a computational model. It was previously known that people in an acute depressive episode were less likely to remember current events. The computational model however suggests that older memories were affected as well. How long the memory deficits reach back depends on how long the depressive episode lasts.
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