Eurekalert

Subscribe to Eurekalert feed Eurekalert
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Updated: 2 min 22 sec ago

Cattle, sheep and goats may transmit leptospirosis to humans in Tanzania

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Leptospirosis, which affects more than one million people worldwide each year, is known to be transmitted to humans from a wide range of animals. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have discovered that more than 7 percent of the cattle and 1 percent of sheep and goats in local slaughterhouses in northern Tanzania are infected with Leptospira bacteria.
Categories: Content

FASEB Journal: Caloric intake and muscle mass at high altitude

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
New research in The FASEB Journal explored why a group of young, healthy adults residing at high altitude lost muscle mass while severely underfed and consuming the same high-protein diet that preserved muscle during weight loss at sea level.
Categories: Content

Mom's voice may help babies sleep better in the NICU

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
When they were played recordings of their mothers reading children's books, babies in the NICU slept better and woke up less often, according to a new abstract presented at this week's annual meeting for Sleep Medicine hosted by the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.
Categories: Content

Letters of recommendation for women more likely to raise doubts

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Letters of recommendation written for women are more likely to contain words or phrases that raise doubts about job or education qualifications than letters written for men, according to new research from Rice University.
Categories: Content

NASA sees Ewiniar slide back into South China Sea and strengthen

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Tropical Cyclone Ewiniar made landfall on mainland China and as the center of circulation has moved back into the South China Sea and reorganized, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP provided a look at the storm.
Categories: Content

Widespread uranium contamination found in India's groundwater

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
A Duke-led study has found widespread uranium contamination in groundwater aquifers -- a chief source for drinking water and irrigation -- in 16 Indian states. The primary source of the contamination is natural, but human factors such as groundwater-table depletion and nitrate pollution may exacerbate the problem. Studies have linked exposure to uranium in drinking water to chronic kidney disease.
Categories: Content

NASA peers into the rainfall of Eastern Pacific' Tropical Storm Aletta

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Tropical Storm Aletta is spinning more than 440 miles off the southwestern coast of Mexico and using satellite data, NASA peered into the storm to uncover where the heaviest rain was falling.
Categories: Content

Gulf of Mexico 'dead zone' forecasted to exceed the size of Connecticut

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Scientists have predicted the dead zone, or area with little to no oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, will become larger than the state of Connecticut by the end of July, according to a new report. While there are more than 500 dead zones around the world, the northern Gulf of Mexico dead zone is the second largest human-caused coastal hypoxic area in the world.
Categories: Content

Study develops a model enhancing particle beam efficiency

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Inspired by tokamaks, Brazilians researchers create via computer simulation an alternative for better control, in accelerators, of the particles' chaotic trajectories.
Categories: Content

Maps made of nerve cells

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Mice move through the virtual world of a video game and provide insight into the mechanisms of memory formation.
Categories: Content

Tiny paragliding beetle that lived with dinosaurs discovered in amber, named 'Jason'

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Scientists discovered a new species of beetle preserved in amber. The tiny beetle, which lived alongside dinosaurs, had fringe on its wings that let it float on the air like a dandelion seed, and its scientific name is "Jason."
Categories: Content

Study shows PR best practices are only second best

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Charles Marsh has studied economic experiments, evolutionary biology and philosophy to examine how indirect reciprocity, or cooperation without expectation of payment, is actually a better approach to public relations than the dominant competition-based approach.
Categories: Content

Scientists ID source of damaging inflammation after heart attack

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Scientists have zeroed in on a culprit that spurs damaging inflammation in the heart following a heart attack. The guilty party is a type of immune cell that tries to heal the injured heart but instead triggers inflammation that leads to even more damage. The researchers, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also have found that an already approved drug effectively tamps down such inflammation in mice, protecting the heart from the progressive damage that often occurs after a heart attack.
Categories: Content

In building the brain, cell pedigree matters

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Research in mice shows that a protein made by the stem cells that give rise to neurons, but not by neurons themselves, is key to brain cells' ability to migrate during development and assume their proper positionsThis primordial protein acts by clinging onto thousands of sites in the genome, affecting the activity of multiple genes that regulate brain development.The findings could yield valuable clues for a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders
Categories: Content

Normal eye dominance is not necessary for restoring visual acuity in amblyopia

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Research published today, led by Aaron W. McGee, Ph.D., assistant professor in the UofL Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, may lead to changes in how amblyopia is treated, particularly in adults. The research shows that eye dominance and visual acuity are controlled by different areas of the brain, and that one can be corrected without correcting the other.
Categories: Content

Individual 'names' reveal complex relationships in male bottlenose dolphins

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Male bottlenose dolphins retain their individual 'names' well into adulthood. Similar to humans, this plays a central role in forming and maintaining complex social relationships, recent findings carried out by researchers at the universities of Zurich and Western Australia suggest. Dolphins form long-lasting alliances in which they give each other mutual support.
Categories: Content

Structural protein found essential to X chromosome inactivation

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has identified the essential role of a structural protein in the silencing of the inactive X chromosome, a process that prevents both copies of the same gene from being expressed in female mammals, which carry two copies of the X chromosome.
Categories: Content

Tonsil and adenoid removal associated with respiratory, allergic and infectious disease

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Removing tonsils and adenoids in childhood increases the long-term risk of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases, according to researchers who have examined -- for the first time -- the long-term effects of the operations.
Categories: Content

Sleep problems in Parkinson's disease: Can we fix them?

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
A team of researchers at VIB and KU Leuven has uncovered why people with a hereditary form of Parkinson's disease suffer from sleep disturbances. The molecular mechanisms uncovered in fruit flies and human stem cells also point to candidate targets for the development of new treatments.
Categories: Content

Decrease in eye injuries to children

Jun 07 2018 - 00:06
Eye injuries that sent children to emergency departments in the United States decreased from 2006 to 2014, and most eye injuries posed low risk for vision loss.
Categories: Content