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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Updated: 8 min 38 sec ago

NASA observes the formation of Tropical Storm Aletta

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite saw the Eastern Pacific Ocean's first tropical storm coming together.
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NASA sees strong storms in Tropical Depression 05W as it strengthened

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Tropical Depression 05W briefly reached tropical storm status overnight on June 5 into June 6, and then weakened back to a depression at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC). Once 05W reached tropical storm status it was named 'Ewiniar.' NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared imagery that provided clues that the storm would strengthen.
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As mystery deepens over the cause of Alzheimer's, a UB lab seeks new answers

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
For more than 20 years, much of the leading research on Alzheimer's has been guided by the 'amyloid hypothesis.' But with a series of failed clinical trials raising questions about this theory, some researchers are looking for deeper explanations into the causes of the disease and how it can be treated. University at Buffalo biologist Shermali Gunawardena is among these investigators.
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Camouflaged plants use the same tricks as animals

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Plants use many of the same methods as animals to camouflage themselves, a new study shows.
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A better way to trace neuronal pathways

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Researchers have improved an important technology used to map neural circuits in the brain. The method, next-generation retrograde viral tracing, can be used in all cell types to relate the connectivity of specific types of neurons to the functions they perform.
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How the brain performs flexible computations

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
MIT neuroscientists have found that by analyzing neural activity using a mathematical concept known as a dynamical system, they can accurately model how the brain performs tasks that require flexible timing.
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Link found between neurotransmitter imbalance, brain connectivity in those with autism

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders identified a link between a neurotransmitter imbalance and brain connectivity between regions of the brain that play a role in social communication and language. The study found two tests that could lead to more precise medical treatments.
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Excess zinc in muscles contributes to wasting syndrome in cancer

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
A new study from Columbia University suggests that an overload of zinc in muscle leads to a debilitating wasting syndrome in cancer patients.
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Majority of Americans believe it is essential that the US remain a global leader in space

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Roughly seven in 10 Americans (72 percent) say it is essential for the US to continue to be a world leader in space exploration. Strong public support is widely shared across gender, generational, educational and political groups.
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Human drug addiction behaviors tied to specific impairments in 6 brain networks

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Systematic review of task-related neuroimaging studies found addicted individuals demonstrate increased activity in these networks during drug-related processing but decreases across all other functions.
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Medical departments of Kazan University work on treatments for hereditary pathologies

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Newest results were showcased at the International Myology School in Moscow on May 16th - 19th, 2018. KFU was represented by Junior Research Associate Mikhail Mavlikeev. In particular, he spoke about an expedition to the Republic of Dagestan, a multiethnic region in Southern Russia, conducted by a combined team of researchers from Kazan, Ryazan, Moscow, and Saint-Petersburg.
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World's most efficient production of succinate from carbon dioxide

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Succinate is widely used as a raw ingredient for petrochemicals, and there is high demand for a way of producing succinate that is renewable and environmentally benign. A Japanese researcher has discovered that succinate production levels increase when cyanobacteria is grown above the ideal temperature for cell growth. He used insights into the metabolic pathway engineering to achieve the world's most efficient production rate for bio-succinate.
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Scientists stunned by decline of birds during epic Southern African roadtrip

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
A two year project repeating a famous bird survey by driving over 20, 000km in a 4x4 across Botswana has confirmed researchers' fears: many birds of prey are fast disappearing from one of Africa's last great wilderness areas. Reported sightings of iconic species of eagle and vulture declined by as much as 80% compared with the previous survey, while some migrant species recorded last time have vanished, according to the study published this week in the international scientific journal Biological Conservation.
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Male vervet monkeys use punishment and coercion to de-escalate costly intergroup fights

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Male vervet monkeys attack members of their own group to prevent them from escalating intergroup encounters into high-risk fights, or to de-escalate ongoing intergroup fights. In contrast, female monkeys use 'the carrot and the stick' to promote male participation in intergroup fights, anthropologists at the University of Zurich and University of Neuchatel have shown.
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Restricting unwanted immune reactions

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Münster researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have decoded a mechanism found at the beginning of almost every inflammatory response. Their study provides a new approach to develop novel treatment options for many inflammatory disorders with many fewer side effects compared to current drugs.
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Who should be on the $10 and $20 bills? How race, gender, and politics shape public opinion

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Race, gender, political affiliation, and the prejudices and biases associated with them (racism, sexism, and political ideology) seem to be at the forefront of citizen's minds when it comes to preferences for US currency -- specifically, who should be on the $10 and $20 bills.
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Double-layered porous nanotubes with spatially separated photoredox surfaces

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Solar energy conversion of water into H2 through photocatalysis is envisaged to be an attractive approach for developing clear energy. However, the separation efficiency of charge carriers is the key to improve the photocatalytic hydrogen production efficiency. A recent study proposed that the double-layered porous nanotubes with spatially separated photoredox surfaces were synthesized by self-template strategy and showed enhanced photocatalytic activity toward hydrogen production (cover articles in Science Bulletin, 2018, 63(10):601-608)
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A new method for solving a series of global optimization problems developed

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
To create highly effective technical systems and technological processes, in addition to the use of new principles, new materials, new physical effects and other new solutions that determine the overall structure of the object being created, one has to choose the best combination of this object's parameters (geometric dimensions, electrical characteristics, etc.), since any changes in the parameters with a fixed overall object structure can significantly affect the effectiveness indicators.
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Study examines how pathogens affect bird migration

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Whether long-distance animal migration facilitates or hampers pathogen transmission depends on how infections affect the routes and timing of migrating hosts.
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Female bats judge a singer by his song

Jun 06 2018 - 00:06
Female lesser short-tailed bats can size up a potential mate just from his singing. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that the New Zealand bat species Mystacina tuberculata relies on singing as a primary method of courtship, and the complex signals given out by males allow females to assess the physiological suitability of a mate. The research was conducted by Cory Toth of the University of Auckland and Stuart Parsons of the Queensland University of Technology in Australia.
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