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New Score Measures Health-related Quality Of Life In Patients With Kidney Failure

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

Highlights

The results of a new study support the validity of a score that considers various patient-reported outcome measures and preferences for assessing health-related quality of life in individuals with kidney failure.

The score is calculated from assessments of cognitive function, depression, fatigue, pain interference, physical functioning, sleep disturbance, and ability to participate in social roles.

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Emergent Magnetic Monopoles Isolated Using Quantum-annealing Computer

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 15, 2021-- Using a D-Wave quantum-annealing computer as a testbed, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have shown that it is possible to isolate so-called emergent magnetic monopoles, a class of quasiparticles, creating a new approach to developing "materials by design."

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Science Snapshots From Berkeley Lab

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

Berkeley Lab Pushes Its Energy-Saving Windows into the Market

By Julie Chao

Windows make up 7% of the envelope area of a home but can account for 47% of the envelope heat loss. High-performance windows thus represent a significant opportunity for consumers to be more comfortable and save money - and help reduce energy demand and greenhouse gas emissions while doing so.

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Benzodiazepines, 'z-drugs' Increase Death Risk When Taken With Opioids

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

A new study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers of more the 400,000 Medicare patients taking medications for insomnia found that the risk of death is increased when either benzodiazepines or "z-drugs" are taken with opioids.

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Wildfire Smoke Exposure Linked To Increased Risk Of Contracting COVID-19

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

Reno, Nev. (July 15, 2021) - Wildfire smoke may greatly increase susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to new research from the Center for Genomic Medicine at the Desert Research Institute (DRI), Washoe County Health District (WCHD), and Renown Health (Renown) in Reno, Nev.

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A Noninvasive Test To Detect Cancer Cells And Pinpoint Their Location

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

CAMBRIDGE, MA -- Most of the tests that doctors use to diagnose cancer -- such as mammography, colonoscopy, and CT scans -- are based on imaging. More recently, researchers have also developed molecular diagnostics that can detect specific cancer-associated molecules that circulate in bodily fluids like blood or urine.

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COVID-19-related Immigration Concerns Among Latinx Immigrants In US

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

What The Study Did: These results suggest that substantial proportions of Latinx immigrants have immigration concerns about engaging in COVID-19-related testing, treatment and contact tracing.

Authors: Carol L. Galletly, J.D., Ph.D., Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.17049)

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Transgender Young People Accessing Health Care

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

What The Study Did: The experiences, perspectives and needs of transgender young people in accessing health care are described in this review of 91 studies.

Authors: Lauren S. H. Chong, M.D., of the Children's Hospital at Westmead in Sydney, Australia, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2021.2061)

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Examining Association Between Cycling, Risk Of Death Among People With Diabetes

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

What The Study Did: This study investigated the association between time spent cycling and the risk of death from cardiovascular disease or any other cause among people with diabetes.

Authors: Mathias Ried-Larsen, Ph.D., of Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamainternmed.2021.3836)

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Abelacimab Effective Blood Clot Treatment, McMaster-led Study Shows

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

Hamilton, ON (July 19, 2021) - A potentially game-changing treatment for people with, or at risk of, blood clots has been found effective by an international team of researchers led by McMaster University's Jeffrey Weitz.

Weitz's team compared abelacimab with enoxaparin as a control drug in 412 patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Results showed that just one abelacimab injection prevents blood clots for up to a month after surgery, reducing the risk by about 80% compared with enoxaparin without increasing the risk of bleeding.

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Tianeptine And Other Supplements Have Gotten An FDA Free Pass For 30 Years - It's Time For That To End

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01
Politics is about trade-offs. Perhaps a reason President Biden isn't better-regarded is because if Congress didn't give him what he wanted, he circumvents them with agencies he controls, such as OSHA with vaccine mandates, the CDC with rent control, and EPA to ban safe weedkillers and pesticides.

He can take a page out of Presidents Clinton and Bush 43 on how to do better if he wins again this fall.

read more

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Mayo Research Provides Insights Into High-risk Younger Demographics For Severe COVID-19

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

ROCHESTER, Minn. ? Using data from 9,859 COVID-19 infections, Mayo Clinic researchers have new insights into risk factors for younger populations, some of which differ significantly from their older counterparts. People younger than 45 had a greater than threefold increased risk of severe infection if they had cancer or heart disease, or blood, neurologic or endocrine disorders, the research found. These associations were weaker in older age groups. The study was published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Public Health Summer Program Increases STEM Career Interests In High Schoolers

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

High school students who participated in summer programs about public health increased their interest in pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), according to a Rutgers study.

Published in the journalPedagogy in Health Promotion, the study explored whether increasing public health awareness would motivate high school students to pursue public health careers.

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EHT Pinpoints Dark Heart Of The Nearest Radio Galaxy

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

An international team anchored by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration, which is known for capturing the first image of a black hole in the galaxy Messier 87, has now imaged the heart of the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A in unprecedented detail. The astronomers pinpoint the location of the central supermassive black hole and reveal how a gigantic jet is being born. Most remarkably, only the outer edges of the jet seem to emit radiation, which challenges our theoretical models of jets.

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More Exercise And Fewer Hours Watching TV Cuts Sleep Apnoea Risk

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

Being more physically active and spending fewer hours per day sitting watching TV is linked to a substantially lower risk of developing obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), according to new research published in the European Respiratory Journal [1]. It is the first study to simultaneously evaluate physical activity and sedentary behaviour in relation to OSA risk.

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Urgent Need For Anti-smoking Campaigns To Continue After Pregnancy

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

Curtin University research has found quit support for smoking mothers should continue even after their first babies are born, given that many of those women will become pregnant again, and that quitting can substantially reduce the risk of future preterm births.

The longitudinal study examined the records and histories across 23 years, of 63,540 Australian women with more than one child, who smoked during their first pregnancy.

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Gene Expression Mechanism May Have Immunity, Cancer Implications

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

PHILADELPHIA -- (July 20, 2021) -- Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is an RNA processing mechanism that regulates gene expression by generating different ends on RNA transcripts of the same gene. Though it affects more than half of human genes, the significance of APA was poorly understood. Now a new study by The Wistar Institute describes an important function of APA in allowing certain mRNAs to reach specific sites of protein synthesis and reveals that length, sequence and structural properties can determine the destination (and fate) of mRNAs within the cell.

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Climate Change Threatens Food Security Of Many Countries Dependent On Fish

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

Millions of people in countries around the world could face an increased risk of malnutrition as climate change threatens their local fisheries.

New projections examining more than 800 fish species in more than 157 countries have revealed how two major, and growing, pressures - climate change and over-fishing - could impact the availability of vital micronutrients from our oceans.

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Bleak Cyborg Future From Brain-computer Interfaces If We're Not Careful

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

WASHINGTON, July 20, 2021 -- Surpassing the biological limitations of the brain and using one's mind to interact with and control external electronic devices may sound like the distant cyborg future, but it could come sooner than we think.

Researchers from Imperial College London conducted a review of modern commercial brain-computer interface (BCI) devices, and they discuss the primary technological limitations and humanitarian concerns of these devices in APL Bioengineering, from AIP Publishing.

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Data Identifies Turbine Wake Clustering, Improves Wind Farm Productivity Via Yaw Control

Jan 11 2024 - 14:01

WASHINGTON, July 20, 2021 -- In the wind power industry, optimization of yaw, the alignment of a wind turbine's angle relative to the horizonal plane, has long shown promise for mitigating wake effects that cause a downstream turbine to produce less power than its upstream partner. However, a critical missing puzzle piece in the application of this knowledge has recently been added -- how to automate the identification of which turbines are experiencing wake effects amid changing wind conditions.

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