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Updated: 59 min 49 sec ago

Cirrhosis Deaths Due To Alcohol Jump Among Young Adults

Jul 19 2018 - 09:07

Between 1999-2016, young adults had substantially higher deaths from cirrhosis in 49 of 50 U.S. states. The deaths linked to the end stages of liver damage jumped by 65 percent with alcohol a major cause in adults age 25-34.

The data published in BMJ shows young adults experienced the highest average annual increase in cirrhosis deaths -- about 10.5 percent each year and driven entirely by alcohol-related liver disease, the authors say. Researchers studied the trends in liver deaths due to cirrhosis by examining death certificates compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research project.

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Sawtooth Swings In Fusion Plasma Stabilized

Jul 19 2018 - 07:07
Up-and-down ripples, swings that rise and recede like the teeth on a saw blade, are found in everything from stock prices on Wall Street to ocean waves; and they occur periodically in the temperature and density of the plasma that fuels fusion reactions in doughnut-shaped facilities called tokamaks. If the swings combine with other instabilities in the plasma they can halt the reactions. Why some plasmas are free of sawtooth gyrations has long puzzled physicists. 

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Sawtooth Swings In Fusion Plasma Stabilized

Jul 19 2018 - 07:07
Up-and-down ripples, swings that rise and recede like the teeth on a saw blade, are found in everything from stock prices on Wall Street to ocean waves; and they occur periodically in the temperature and density of the plasma that fuels fusion reactions in doughnut-shaped facilities called tokamaks. If the swings combine with other instabilities in the plasma they can halt the reactions. Why some plasmas are free of sawtooth gyrations has long puzzled physicists. 

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New Type Of Dibaryon Predicted - But Is It Real?

Jul 18 2018 - 17:07
If you want to know how to do time travel, ask a mathematician. If you want to show how math is not science, but is instead the language of science, hand those equations to a physicist. 

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New Type Of Dibaryon Predicted - But Is It Real?

Jul 18 2018 - 17:07
If you want to know how to do time travel, ask a mathematician. If you want to show how math is not science, but is instead the language of science, hand those equations to a physicist. 

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Crowdfunding Is Easier If A Woman Is In Charge

Jul 18 2018 - 17:07

Gender bias against women is nothing new, especially when it comes to seeking venture capital financing for business start-ups,  but in modern crowdfunding -  where a "crowd" of amateur investors make small investments in new companies - culture it is just the opposite; female entrepreneurs are considered more trustworthy.

There are numerous ways to get a business off the ground. Friends and family financing, private equity, bank financing, venture capital, but the difficult road for entrepreneurs has meant that business leaders should be tough - and that has meant more masculine.

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Crowdfunding Is Easier If A Woman Is In Charge

Jul 18 2018 - 17:07

Gender bias against women is nothing new, especially when it comes to seeking venture capital financing for business start-ups,  but in modern crowdfunding -  where a "crowd" of amateur investors make small investments in new companies - culture it is just the opposite; female entrepreneurs are considered more trustworthy.

There are numerous ways to get a business off the ground. Friends and family financing, private equity, bank financing, venture capital, but the difficult road for entrepreneurs has meant that business leaders should be tough - and that has meant more masculine.

read more

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Learning About Ancient Diets From Modern British Teeth

Jul 18 2018 - 10:07
British smiles have an unflattering international image, but a new study has put tartar from infamously bad teeth to good use. By analyzing the teeth of Britons from the Iron Age to the modern day they have leveraged a way to use proteins in tooth tartar to reveal what our ancestors ate. 

Dental plaque accumulates on the surface of teeth during life and is mineralized by components of saliva to form tartar or "dental calculus", entombing proteins from the food we eat in the process. Proteins are hearty molecules and can survive in tartar for thousands of years. That's good for science. 

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Categories: Science 2.0

Learning About Ancient Diets From Modern British Teeth

Jul 18 2018 - 10:07
British smiles have an unflattering international image, but a new study has put tartar from infamously bad teeth to good use. By analyzing the teeth of Britons from the Iron Age to the modern day they have leveraged a way to use proteins in tooth tartar to reveal what our ancestors ate. 

Dental plaque accumulates on the surface of teeth during life and is mineralized by components of saliva to form tartar or "dental calculus", entombing proteins from the food we eat in the process. Proteins are hearty molecules and can survive in tartar for thousands of years. That's good for science. 

read more

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Global Warming Could Ruin The Internet

Jul 17 2018 - 19:07
At the Applied Networking Research Workshop, a meeting of the Association for Computing Machinery, the Internet Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, one group claimed critical communications infrastructure, buried fiber optic cable, could be submerged by rising seas in as soon as 15 years. 

They estimate that by the year 2033 more than 4,000 miles of buried fiber optic conduit will be underwater and more than 1,100 traffic hubs will be surrounded by water. The most susceptible U.S. cities are predictably New York, Miami and Seattle. 

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Global Warming Could Ruin The Internet

Jul 17 2018 - 19:07
At the Applied Networking Research Workshop, a meeting of the Association for Computing Machinery, the Internet Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, one group claimed critical communications infrastructure, buried fiber optic cable, could be submerged by rising seas in as soon as 15 years. 

They estimate that by the year 2033 more than 4,000 miles of buried fiber optic conduit will be underwater and more than 1,100 traffic hubs will be surrounded by water. The most susceptible U.S. cities are predictably New York, Miami and Seattle. 

read more

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Even The Smell Of Coffee Boosts Math Performance

Jul 17 2018 - 16:07
Coffee is the official drink of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM), so much so that a new study finds that it's downright Pavlovian. Even the smell of coffee boosts numerical performance. 

In their experiment, scholars administered a 10-question Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT - the analytical portion of a computer adaptive test required by many graduate schools) in a computer lab to about 100 undergraduate business students, divided into two groups. One group took the test in the presence of an ambient coffee-like scent, while a control group took the same test - but in an unscented room.

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Even The Smell Of Coffee Boosts Math Performance

Jul 17 2018 - 16:07
Coffee is the official drink of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM), so much so that a new study finds that it's downright Pavlovian. Even the smell of coffee boosts numerical performance. 

In their experiment, scholars administered a 10-question Graduate Management Aptitude Test (GMAT - the analytical portion of a computer adaptive test required by many graduate schools) in a computer lab to about 100 undergraduate business students, divided into two groups. One group took the test in the presence of an ambient coffee-like scent, while a control group took the same test - but in an unscented room.

read more

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Why Pot Gives You The Munchies Identified In Animal Studies

Jul 17 2018 - 12:07
It's no secret that marijuana usage leads to hunger, it even has a colloquial name - "the munchies." But understanding the neuroscience of that that could also help people who lose their appetites during illness. 

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Why Pot Gives You The Munchies Identified In Animal Studies

Jul 17 2018 - 12:07
It's no secret that marijuana usage leads to hunger, it even has a colloquial name - "the munchies." But understanding the neuroscience of that that could also help people who lose their appetites during illness. 

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Hunter Gatherers Baked Their Own Bread 14,000 Years Ago - 4,000 Years Before Agriculture

Jul 17 2018 - 10:07
Some 4,000 years before domesticated agriculture, hunter-gatherers baked their own bread, according to a discovery at an archaeological site in northeastern Jordan.

Researchers have discovered the charred remains of a flatbread baked around 14,400 years ago, the oldest direct evidence of bread found to date, predating the advent of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

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Hunter Gatherers Baked Their Own Bread 14,000 Years Ago - 4,000 Years Before Agriculture

Jul 17 2018 - 10:07
Some 4,000 years before domesticated agriculture, hunter-gatherers baked their own bread, according to a discovery at an archaeological site in northeastern Jordan.

Researchers have discovered the charred remains of a flatbread baked around 14,400 years ago, the oldest direct evidence of bread found to date, predating the advent of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period.

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New Class Of Commercial Herbicide Is All Natural - But Discovered Using Science

Jul 16 2018 - 16:07
Nature is not just out to kill us, it is out to kill itself, in the interest of surviving over the long term. That is why even the most wholesome backyard organic garden is a hotbed of combat between plants and unseen microorganisms in the soil fighting for space to grow.

To defeat a plant, a microbe might produce and use toxic chemicals - but then the microbe also needs immunity from its own poisons. The genes that create protective shield in microorganisms could become a new, highly effective weed killer and the first new class of commercial herbicides in more than 30 years.

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New Class Of Commercial Herbicide Is All Natural - But Discovered Using Science

Jul 16 2018 - 16:07
Nature is not just out to kill us, it is out to kill itself, in the interest of surviving over the long term. That is why even the most wholesome backyard organic garden is a hotbed of combat between plants and unseen microorganisms in the soil fighting for space to grow.

To defeat a plant, a microbe might produce and use toxic chemicals - but then the microbe also needs immunity from its own poisons. The genes that create protective shield in microorganisms could become a new, highly effective weed killer and the first new class of commercial herbicides in more than 30 years.

read more

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Bees: It's The Viruses That Are The Problem

Jul 16 2018 - 11:07

While environmentalists raise millions of dollars insisting they will get targeted pesticides (e.g. neonicotinoids) banned to save bees that aren't really in peril, science is looking at things which do actually put bees at risk.

At the top of the list is not pesticides, it's nature. An international team has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees, which could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators. 

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