Tech

Bethesda, MD - Feb. 7, 2018 - Stephen Curry, Professor of Structural Biology at Imperial College in London, is calling for research assessment reform to become more than just words. As chair of a new steering committee behind the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), Professor Curry's call to action is bolstered by investments from nine organizations in the U.S. and Europe combined with signatures on the Declaration for each of the U.K.'s seven Research Councils.

For people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities, the number of food options in the stores is growing. But current tests for gluten are not finding all of the substance in foods, resulting in some products being labeled "gluten free" when they really aren't. Now researchers reporting in ACS Sensors say they have developed a fast gluten detector that has the potential to detect and quantify different sources of gluten than those on the market today.

PITTSBURGH--Conversational agents such as Siri, Alexa and Cortana are great at giving you the weather, but are flummoxed when asked for unusual information, or follow-up questions. By adding humans to the loop, Carnegie Mellon University researchers have created a conversational agent that is tough to stump.

As the fight against drug-resistant infections continues, University of Leeds scientists are looking back at previously discarded chemical compounds, to see if any could be developed for new antibiotics.

In the heyday of antibiotic development in the mid-20th century many different chemical compounds with antibacterial properties were examined, but only a small proportion were selected for development into drugs.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Human peripheral nerves -- all the nerves outside of the central nervous system -- are protected by the blood-nerve barrier. This is a tight covering of endothelial cells that maintains the microenvironment within the nerves by restricting the amounts or types of water, ions, solutes and nutrients that can reach the axons, or electric cables within the nerves, from the blood circulation system.

This allows the nerves to function.

Cockroaches are so hardy, a popular joke goes, that they've occupied the Earth long before humans first appeared ---and will probably even outlast us long after we have annihilated each other by nuclear war.

But now, researchers have used the latest in genomic data to gain the most detailed information yet of their evolutionary history.

To build more aerodynamic machines, researchers are drawing inspiration from an unlikely source: the ocean.

A team of evolutionary biologists and engineers at Harvard University, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of South Carolina, have shed light on a decades-old mystery about sharkskin and, in the process, demonstrated a new, bioinspired structure that could improve the aerodynamic performance of planes, wind turbines, drones and cars.

The research is published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface.

A team of computer scientists from the University of Delaware and Georgetown University has developed a new system to rapidly determine which cancer drugs are likely to work best given a patient's genetic markers. The first publicly available system of its kind, their database, eGARD (extracting Genomic Anomalies association with Response to Drugs), is described in PLOS One.

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found a significant number of children across four regions in the United States were determined to have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The new findings may represent more accurate prevalence estimates of FASD among the general population than prior research.

The study is published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Los Angeles, CA (February 6, 2018). Over-the-counter pain medicine such as Ibuprofen and acetaminophen may influence how people process information, experience hurt feelings, and react to emotionally evocative images, according to recent studies. Examining these findings and how policymakers should respond, a new article is out today in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, a Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences (FABBS) journal published in partnership with SAGE Publishing.