Tech

Man-made earthquakes in Oklahoma, USA, are strongly linked to the depth at which wastewater from the oil and gas industry are injected into the ground, according to a new study led by the University of Bristol.

Oklahoma has been a seismic hotspot for the past decade, with the number of damaging earthquakes -- including the magnitude 5.8 Pawnee earthquake in 2016 -- regularly impacting on the lives of residents, leading to litigation against well operators.

Thousands of short RNA molecules with diverse genetic sequences serve as security guards to identify and silence attempts to invade the genome, such as DNA inserted by viruses or parasitic elements known as transposons.

The remarkable strength of ionic crystals is easily explained at the atomic scale: Positively and negatively charged atoms sit side by side in a periodic arrangement that repeats countless times. The strong electrostatic force in between keeps them together.

A neuron firing deep in the brain might sound a little like: Drumroll...cymbal crash! Drumroll...cymbal crash! Repeat. With emphasis on "repeat," according to a new study.

Novel computational methods have helped create the most information-packed universe-scale simulation ever produced. The new tool provides fresh insights into how black holes influence the distribution of dark matter, how heavy elements are produced and distributed throughout the cosmos, and where magnetic fields originate.

PULLMAN, Wash. - Washington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently generate hydrogen from water - an important key to making clean energy more viable.

Using inexpensive nickel and iron, the researchers developed a very simple, five-minute method to create large amounts of a high-quality catalyst required for the chemical reaction to split water.

They describe their method in the February issue of the journal Nano Energy.

Updated results from a global clinical trial of the CAR T-cell therapy, tisagenlecleucel, a landmark personalized treatment for a high-risk form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), reveal that children and young adults continued to show high rates of durable, complete remission of their disease. Most side effects were short-lived and reversible, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Rutgers engineers have invented a "4D printing" method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of "living" structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery.

The 4D printing approach here involves printing a 3D object with a hydrogel (water-containing gel) that changes shape over time when temperatures change, said Howon Lee, senior author of a new study and assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

Viruses have their own genetic material and can infect human cells in a very specific manner. They will then reproduce as directed by their own genes but using the resources of the host cell. These properties make them interesting "gene shuttles" to fight hereditary diseases or cancer. There are innumerable different viruses, but the human adenovirus 5, which normally causes the symptoms of a typical cold, has substantial advantages: Its genome can be replaced completely by an artificial one which contains only "useful" genes.

From Mother Nature to our must-have devices, we're surrounded by crystals. Those courtesy of the former, such as ice and snow, can form spontaneously and symmetrically. But the silicon-based or gallium nitride crystals found in LEDs and other electronics require a bit of coaxing to attain their ideal shapes and alignments.

At UC Santa Barbara, researchers have now unlocked another piece of the theoretical puzzle that governs the growth of crystals -- a development that may save time and energy in the many processes that require crystal formation.