Tech

Nanoparticles derived from tea leaves inhibit the growth of lung cancer cells, destroying up to 80% of them, new research by a joint Swansea University and Indian team has shown.

The team made the discovery while they were testing out a new method of producing a type of nanoparticle called quantum dots. These are tiny particles which measure less than 10 nanometres. A human hair is 40,000 nanometres thick.

The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, where original works in the field of chemistry and physics are published, has printed an article by an international team of scientists describing a discovery of the mechanism for the formation of the simplest polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), naphthalene. The mechanism depicted by the scientists will help in creating physically based combustion models required for the development of fundamentally new ecologically friendly combustion chambers for gas turbine engines.

ATS 2018, San Diego, CA - A long-term study of the health of Canadian children has found that exposure to ozone (O3), a common air pollutant, at birth was associated with an 82 percent increased risk of developing asthma by age three. The study, which was a 10-year follow-up to the 2006 Toronto Child Health Evaluation Questionnaire (T-CHEQ), was presented at the 2018 American Thoracic Society International Conference.

People with prediabetes have blood sugar levels higher than normal but below Type 2 diabetes levels. People with OSA experience times during sleep when air is obstructed from flowing normally into the lungs. CPAP is considered the "gold standard" treatment for OSA.

According to Sushmita Pamidi, MD, lead study author and a sleep physician-scientist at McGill University, previous studies have found that OSA is associated with increased sympathetic activity, which activates our "fight or flight" response. This response, in turn, raises our heart rate.

East Hanover, NJ. May 18, 2018. Stroke researchers have confirmed that the presence of frontal cortical lesions moderated response to prism adaptation treatment after right-brain stroke. Their findings are detailed in "Frontal lesions predict response to prism adaptation treatment in spatial neglect: A randomised controlled study" (doi: 10.1080/09602011.2018.1448287), which was published online ahead of print on March 20, 2018 by Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. The authors are Kelly M.

MAYWOOD, IL - A Loyola Medicine study has found that new ultrasound guidelines can reliably identify pediatric patients who should be biopsied for thyroid cancer.

The study by radiologist Jennifer Lim-Dunham, MD, and colleagues was presented May 18 during the Society for Pediatric Radiology's annual meeting in Nashville.

Thyroid cancer is a common cause of cancer in teenagers, and the incidence is increasing for reasons that are unclear. Adolescents have a 10-fold greater incidence than younger children, and the disease is five times more common in girls than boys.

CORVALLIS, Ore. - Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a computer program that represents a key step toward better understanding the connections between mutant genetic material and disease.

Known as bpRNA, the software is a big-data annotation tool for secondary structures in ribonucleic acids.

Rutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater and grabs objects and moves them.

The watery creation could lead to soft robots that mimic sea animals like the octopus, which can walk underwater and bump into things without damaging them. It may also lead to artificial heart, stomach and other muscles, along with devices for diagnosing diseases, detecting and delivering drugs and performing underwater inspections.

In a new SLAS Technology auto-commentary, two authors of an article recently published in Nature Biomedical Engineering (Abnormal Scar Identification with Spherical Nucleic Acid Technology) share more insight into their unique method for skin disease diagnosis using NanoFlare nanotechnology.

In exploring the optical properties of the Madagascar comet moth's cocoon fibers, Columbia Engineering team discovers the fibers' exceptional capabilities to reflect sunlight and to transmit optical signals and images, and develops methods to spin artificial fibers mimicking the natural fibers' nanostructures and optical properties