Tech

A molecular biologist from Lomonosov Moscow State University together with foreign colleagues discovered a special mechanism of protein synthesis regulation that they called a "molecular timer". It controls the number of protein molecules produced by a cell and prevents the generation of extra molecules. When activated with drugs, such a timer may help efficiently combat cancerous tumors. The study was supported with a grant of the Russian Science Foundation (RSF), and its results were published in Nature journal.

A team of neuroscientists from the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown (CCU), in Lisbon, Portugal, has discovered that were it not for specific taste neurons located in the fruit fly's proboscis (the equivalent of our tongue), the fly would not develop a craving for protein even when in excruciating need of it. The results, published in the journal eLife, could represent a step towards preventing the transmission of certain insect-borne human diseases.

Young people in care benefit from the psychological, emotional and social support gained via social media networks - according to new research from the University of East Anglia's Centre for Research on the Child and Family (CRCF).

Until now, the automatic assumption has been that platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp only pose a risk for this vulnerable group.

Man-made earthquakes in Oklahoma, USA, are strongly linked to the depth at which wastewater from the oil and gas industry are injected into the ground, according to a new study led by the University of Bristol.

Oklahoma has been a seismic hotspot for the past decade, with the number of damaging earthquakes -- including the magnitude 5.8 Pawnee earthquake in 2016 -- regularly impacting on the lives of residents, leading to litigation against well operators.

Thousands of short RNA molecules with diverse genetic sequences serve as security guards to identify and silence attempts to invade the genome, such as DNA inserted by viruses or parasitic elements known as transposons.

The remarkable strength of ionic crystals is easily explained at the atomic scale: Positively and negatively charged atoms sit side by side in a periodic arrangement that repeats countless times. The strong electrostatic force in between keeps them together.

A neuron firing deep in the brain might sound a little like: Drumroll...cymbal crash! Drumroll...cymbal crash! Repeat. With emphasis on "repeat," according to a new study.

Novel computational methods have helped create the most information-packed universe-scale simulation ever produced. The new tool provides fresh insights into how black holes influence the distribution of dark matter, how heavy elements are produced and distributed throughout the cosmos, and where magnetic fields originate.

PULLMAN, Wash. - Washington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently generate hydrogen from water - an important key to making clean energy more viable.

Using inexpensive nickel and iron, the researchers developed a very simple, five-minute method to create large amounts of a high-quality catalyst required for the chemical reaction to split water.

They describe their method in the February issue of the journal Nano Energy.

Updated results from a global clinical trial of the CAR T-cell therapy, tisagenlecleucel, a landmark personalized treatment for a high-risk form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), reveal that children and young adults continued to show high rates of durable, complete remission of their disease. Most side effects were short-lived and reversible, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.