In 2015, the estimated medical costs attributable to both fatal and nonfatal falls in older US adults was approximately $50 billion. The findings come from a recent analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

For nonfatal falls in adults aged 65 and older, Medicare paid approximately $28.9 billion, Medicaid $8.7 billion and private and other payers $12.0 billion. Overall medical spending for fatal falls was estimated to be $754 million.

DALLAS, March 7, 2018 - When heart failure patients receive a heart pumping device known as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), their caregivers seem to suffer, too - at least initially, according to research in Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA), the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The evidence on which India's top selling drug combinations for diabetes have been approved for sale is shoddy, with the requisite trial data falling well short of the international standards set by the World Health Organization (WHO), finds the first study of its kind published in the online journal BMJ Global Health.

So poor are the data that, not only could the health of patients with type 2 diabetes be potentially put at risk, but they also call into question the role of the multinational corporations behind the manufacture of these drug combos, say the researchers.

A naturally occurring compound found in cannabis may help to curb the frequency of epileptic seizures, suggests a review of the available evidence, published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

But the evidence to date is confined to the treatment of children and teens whose epilepsy does not respond to conventional drugs, and rare and serious forms of the condition, caution the researchers.

Differences in the active treatment of lung cancer across England may be cutting short the lives of hundreds of patients with the disease every year, concludes research published online in the journal Thorax.

Disease and patient factors don't seem to be driving these variations, say the researchers, who calculate that if treatment rates rose to optimal levels, 800 patients could "have a clinically relevant extension of their lives each year."

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- High school students prefer vegetables seasoned with herbs and spices, rather than plain veggies, according to Penn State researchers, who add this may lead to students liking and eating more vegetables, and result in less food waste in schools.

Diagnosis of Zika infection is complex. Molecular tests for exposure are only reliable in the first two to three weeks after infection while the virus is circulating in the bloodstream. Antibody tests are confounded by cross-reactivity of antibodies to Zika with dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses following infection or vaccination.

New research from the University of British Columbia suggests that following a strict eating schedule can help clear away the protein responsible for Huntington disease in mice.

Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, progressive disorder that causes involuntary movements and psychiatric problems. Symptoms appear in adulthood and worsen over time. Children born to a parent with HD have a one in two chance of inheriting the disease, which is caused by a buildup of mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT).

CHAPEL HILL -- Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women in the United States, with most deaths caused by the cancer spreading beyond the breast. In a new study, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have identified genetic clues that explain how breast cancer spreads, or metastasizes - findings that may lead to better treatments or approaches to prevent its spread at the onset.

PHILADELPHIA - Although certain genetic variants increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), age is the strongest known risk factor. But the way in which molecular processes of aging predispose people to AD, or become impaired in AD remains a mystery. A team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, publishing in Nature Neuroscience this week, profiled the epigenomic landscape of AD brains, specifically in one of the regions affected early in AD, the lateral temporal lobe.