Body

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC - As the national conversation about marijuana legalization continues, an important question is how changing marijuana policy may influence use of other substances, such as alcohol. A new study, led by researchers at RTI International, surveyed more than 1,900 adults in Oregon prior to the legalization of marijuana in the state and found that more than half (52.5%) consider alcohol to be more harmful than marijuana while few (7.5%) believe marijuana is more harmful to a person's health.

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -- GM-CSF, a protein that modifies the immune response to the flu, may also help reduce lung inflammation and improve survival during influenza, according to Penn State researchers.

The researchers studied the survival and lung function of mice with influenza in the lab. They found that the mice that had been given large amounts of a special cytokine -- molecules that warn other cells that there's an infection or other trauma in the body -- called GM-CSF, had better survival and lung function than the other mice.

In an analysis of one of the largest electronic medical records databases in the world, researchers found that patients with acne had a significantly increased risk of developing major depression, but only in the first 5 years after being diagnosed with acne.

The British Journal of Dermatology analysis included data from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) (1986-2012), a large primary care database in the United Kingdom.

In a recent Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports study, one year of yoga training decreased pro-inflammatory adipokines and increased an anti-inflammatory adipokine in adults with metabolic syndrome and high-normal blood pressure.

Adipokines are signaling proteins released by fat tissue.

A new study indicates that the drug fosfomycin may be effective for treating multidrug-resistant bacterial infections.

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study, many well-functioning and highly active older adults experienced back pain, which was linked with poorer perceived and observed walking endurance.

Children should not be considered 'small adults' when it comes to prescribing medications, but it can be difficult to determine the right dosage of a particular drug for young patients.

Products that are "biosimilar" or interchangeable with a licensed biological product hold considerable promise for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions such as rheumatic diseases, and possibly at a reduced cost. In Arthritis & Rheumatology, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has published its latest position statement (or Whitepaper) on the rationale for the use of biosimilars in clinical practice.

In an Epilepsia analysis of 2008-2010 Medicare claims data, one in four older Americans with new-onset epilepsy and more than one-third with prevalent epilepsy received a combination of antiepileptic drugs and non-epilepsy drugs that could interact to alter the effectiveness of the non-epilepsy drugs. Also, more than 1 in 5 patients received a drug combination that could alter the effect of the antiepileptic drugs and potentially cause toxicity.

BEER-SHEVA, Israel...February 7, 2018 - A female patient treated by a female physician is less likely to be admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) compared to a male patient treated by a male physician, according to researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Soroka University Medical Center (Soroka).

This gender bias, explored in a paper published in the current issue of QJM: An International Journal of Medicine, seems to occur most often when female doctors are recommending treatment for critically ill women.