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Pioneering research on mechanistic basis of disease in new journal Systems Medicine

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
The new peer-reviewed journal, Systems Medicine, has launched with a powerful mission to capture the leading research in the emerging field of medical systems biology.
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Men and women have opposite genetic alterations in depression

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
Men and women with major depressive disorder (MDD) have opposite changes in the expression of the same genes, according to a new postmortem brain study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada. The findings, published in Biological Psychiatry, indicate distinct pathology, and suggest that men and women may need different types of treatment for depression.
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UH optometrist investigates changes in eye structure in astronauts

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
A University of Houston optometrist studies the vision of returning International Space Station astronauts and proves a structural change to their eyes.
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Bone marrow edema in lower spine is common in young athletes

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
New research indicates that young recreational and elite athletes commonly accumulate excess fluid in the bone marrow around the joint that connects the spine with the pelvis.
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Hunger guides mountain lions' actions to enter residential areas

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
In a new study, researchers found that while big cats like mountain lions are generally fearful of and avoid humans, hunger can dampen that fear.
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Study debunks fears of increased teen suicide risk from popular flu drug

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
A new study published by researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago suggests that the drug oseltamivir -- commonly known as Tamiflu -- does not cause an increased risk of suicide in pediatric patients.
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Compassion helped Neanderthals to survive, new study reveals

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
They have an unwarranted image as brutish and uncaring, but new research has revealed just how knowledgeable and effective Neanderthal healthcare was.
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Screening mammography for women 40-49 detects more cancers compared with older age groups

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
When compared to the screening population ages 50 and over, screening mammography in women ages 40-49 detects 19.3 percent additional cancers at the expense of an overall 1.5 percent increase in callbacks and 0.1 percent in increased biopsies, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, DC.
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Field-data study finds no evidence of racial bias in predictive policing

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
While predictive policing aims to improve the effectiveness of police patrols, there is concern that these algorithms may lead police to target minority communities and result in discriminatory arrests. A computer scientist in the School of Science at IUPUI conducted the first study to look at real-time field data from Los Angeles and found predictive policing did not result in biased arrests.
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Surprising discovery provides insights into aggressive endometrial cancers

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
New research from Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) indicates steroid and hormone receptors are simultaneously active in many endometrial cancer tissues. The findings, published today in the journal Cell Reports, yield insights about factors that contribute to more aggressive endometrial tumors
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Warm arctic means colder, snowier winters in northeastern US, study says

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
Scientists from Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) have linked the frequency of extreme winter weather in the United States to Arctic temperatures.
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The early bird got to fly: Archaeopteryx was an active flyer

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
The question of whether the Late Jurassic dino-bird Archaeopteryx was an elaborately feathered ground dweller, a glider, or an active flyer has fascinated palaeontologists for decades. Valuable new information obtained with state-of-the-art synchrotron microtomography at the ESRF, the European Synchrotron (Grenoble, France), allowed an international team of scientists to answer this question in Nature Communications. The wing bones of Archaeopteryx were shaped for incidental active flight, but not for the advanced style of flying mastered by today's birds.
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Mitochondria may metabolize ADP differently in aging muscle, despite exercise resistance

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
Most adults reach their peak levels of muscle mass in their late 30s or early 40s. Even for those who exercise regularly, strength and function then start to decline. Those who don't can experience dramatic drops. Now, a study published March 13 in the journal Cell Reports provides new clues about the cellular mechanisms of aging muscles, highlighting the importance of how mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, process ADP, which provides energy to cells.
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Shaken, and stirred: Scaling up bioreactors' fluid dynamics

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
Bioreactors are used to produce different therapeutics in the biopharmaceutical and regenerative medicine industries. Drug development relies on small multi-well plates shaken around an orbital diameter, while production-scale bioreactors are agitated by stirring. These different methods yield different fluid dynamics. Researchers in the U.K. are starting to bridge this gap by applying analytical techniques for stirred bioreactors to the fluid dynamics of orbitally shaken bioreactors. They discuss their work in this week's Physics of Fluids.
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The thousand-year-old egg (video)

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
Century eggs, or pidan, are a preserved food made by fermenting duck eggs in alkali. The green and black color of these eggs is not very appealing at first blush, and the smell is even worse. However, this Ming dynasty innovation effectively extended the shelf life of eggs and has been adopted as a beloved comfort food in China and throughout the world. Reactions explains the chemistry behind this unusual culinary offering.
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Warm summers could weaken ocean circulation

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
Deep convection in the North Atlantic is one of the key components of the large-scale ocean circulation. Based on long-term observations, scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now demonstrated the influence of increased surface freshening in summer on convection in the following winter. As the researchers write now in the journal Nature Climate Change, enhanced surface freshening and warmer winters have shortened the duration of ocean convection in the last decade.
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Researchers develop spectroscopic thermometer for nanomaterials

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
A scientific team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has found a new way to take the local temperature of a material from an area about a billionth of a meter wide, or approximately 100,000 times thinner than a human hair. This discovery, published in Physical Review Letters, promises to improve the understanding of useful yet unusual physical and chemical behaviors that arise in materials and structures at the nanoscale.
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Concerns rise over transgender violence since the 2016 US presidential election

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
A national sample of transgender and gender non-conforming individuals reported high levels of concern about violence and discrimination related to the 2016 US Presidential election in a new study.
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NIH scientists describe potential antibody treatment for multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
Researchers are developing a promising alternative to antibiotic treatment for infections caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria resistant to carbapenem antibiotics. The approach uses antibodies to target the K. pneumoniae protective capsule polysaccharide, allowing immune system cells called neutrophils to attack and kill the bacteria. The early stage, in vitro research was conducted by scientists at NIAID's Rocky Mountain Laboratories and the New Jersey Medical School-Rutgers University.
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Biophysicists discover how small populations of bacteria survive treatment

Mar 13 2018 - 00:03
Small populations of pathogenic bacteria may be harder to kill off than larger populations because they respond differently to antibiotics.
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