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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Updated: 10 min 53 sec ago

'Lazy lawn mowers' can help support suburban bee populations and diversity

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Homeowners concerned about the decline of bees, butterflies and other pollinating insects need look no further than their own back yards, says ecologist Susannah Lerman at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the USDA Forest Service. In new research, she and colleagues suggest that homeowners can help support bee habitat in suburban yards, specifically their lawns, by changing lawn-mowing habits.
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Magnon spin currents can be controlled via spin valve structure

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Construction set of magnon logic extended.
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Plastic fantastic -- researchers turn plastic pollution into cleaners

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered a way to re-use a common plastic to break down harmful dyes in our waste water.
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Underwater volcano behavior captured by timely scientific expedition

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Researchers got a rare opportunity to study an underwater volcano in the Caribbean when it erupted while they were surveying the area.
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Canada remains 7th in World Happiness Report rankings

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Canada remains the seventh happiest country in the world, according to a new report co-edited by CIFAR Distinguished Fellow John Helliwell.
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Graphene flakes for future transistors

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Tiny and very promising for possible applications in the field of nanoelectronics: they are the graphene nanoflakes studied by a SISSA's team and protagonists of a study recently published in the Nano Letters journal. These hexagonal shaped nanostructures would allow to exploit quantum effects to modulate the current flow. Thanks to their intrinsic magnetic properties, they could also represent a significant step forward in the field of spintronics, which is based on the electron spin.
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Daily dose of violent video games has no long-term effect on adult aggression

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Playing violent action adventure games for prolonged periods does not make adults more aggressive say researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf in Germany. A new study led by Simone Kühn looked at the influence long-term violent video game play has on aggression levels, and compared this with playing a life simulation game or not playing a video game at all. The research is published in the Springer Nature journal Molecular Psychiatry.
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Boron can form a purely honeycomb, graphene-like 2-D structure

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Borophene is known to have triangular lattice with holes, while honeycomb lattice of boron was predicted to be energetically unstable. However, a research team led by Prof. K. H. Wu at Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences successfully fabricated a purely honeycomb, graphene-like borophene, by using an Al(111) surface as the substrate and molecular beam epitaxy in ultrahigh vacuum, providing an ideal platform for artificial boron-based materials with intriguing electronic properties such as Dirac states and superconductivity behavior.
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Did Michelangelo include a hidden caricature of himself in one of his famous sketches?

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
A new Clinical Anatomy article presents evidence that Michelangelo inserted his self-portrait into a sketch of his close friend, Vittoria Colonna, which is currently in the collection of the British Museum in London, England.
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How accurate is your AI?

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Kyoto University researcher reports on a new evaluation method for the type of AI that predicts yes/positive/true or no/negative/false answers.
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Treatment for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Treatments for the anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis usually include steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab, cyclophosphamide and tumor resection. The researchers aimed to compare the efficacy of the treatments including intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab or cyclophosphamide for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients without tumor and to discuss potential biomarkers for this disease.
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Digging deep: Harnessing the power of soil microbes for more sustainable farming

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
How will the farms of the future feed a projected 9.8 billion people by 2050? Berkeley Lab's 'smart farm' project marries microbiology and machine learning in an effort to reduce the need for chemical fertilizers and enhance soil carbon uptake, thus improving the long-term viability of the land while increasing crop yields.
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'Cold-blooded' pythons make for caring moms

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
The female Southern African python is the first ever egg-laying snake species shown to care for their babies. This comes at great cost to themselves, as they never eat during the breeding period -- with many snakes starving -- and turn their color to black in order to attract more sun while basking to raise their body temperature.
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Pairing mobile phone reminders with incentives to help prevent diseases

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
In a study conducted in rural India, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers working in collaboration with Bal Umang Drishya Sanstha (BUDS), a nonprofit Indian organization focused on child health, have found that mobile phone reminders linked with incentives such as free talk time minutes work better than phone alerts alone to improve childhood immunization rates in poor communities.
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While a candidate's voice pitch sways voters, it doesn't result in better leaders

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Studies show that people with lower-pitched voices are more likely to win elected office because they are believed to be superior leaders with greater physical prowess and integrity. But is voice pitch a reliable signal of leadership quality? And is the bias in favor of selecting leaders with lower voices good or bad for democracy? Researchers from Florida Atlantic University and the University of Miami are the first to address these questions in a new study.
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American Federation for Aging Research experts featured in PBS special: Incredible Aging

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Fourteen AFAR experts are among those featured in "Incredible Aging: Adding Life to Your Years," a new documentary program premiering on PBS stations nationwide in March 2018. The program, hosted by 14-time Emmy Award-winner Meredith Vieira, is based on the latest scientific research on healthy aging--much of it funded by AFAR.
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NIH scientists search for the clocks behind aging brain disorders

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
To understand the link between aging and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, NIH scientists compared the genetic clocks that tick during the lives of normal and mutant flies. They found that altering the activity of a gene called Cdk5 appeared to make the clocks run faster than normal, and the flies older than their chronological age. This caused the flies to have problems walking or flying later in life, to show signs of neurodegeneration, and to die earlier.
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One in four Americans suffer when exposed to common chemicals

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
University of Melbourne research reveals that one in four Americans report chemical sensitivity, with nearly half this group medically diagnosed with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS), suffering health problems from exposure to common chemical product.
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Crabs in your computer

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
A study published in GigaScience provides three-dimensional visual data from hermit crabs using 3-D microCT scanning technology. The authors not only describe the data, they also provide downloadable, interactive files of everything in this study, allowing everyone to use and manipulate the data. They even include interactive web-based viewers and 3-D printable file formats. Making this complex data publicly available, allows researchers cost-efficient options for examining specimens without the need to send out precious samples.
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Scientists remind their peers: Female birds sing, too

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
When North American ornithologists hear a bird singing, they're likely to assume it's a male. But in many species, the females sing too -- and a new commentary in The Auk: Ornithological Advances argues that a better understanding of these unappreciated female songs could lead to advances in many aspects of bird biology.
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