Eurekalert

Subscribe to Eurekalert feed Eurekalert
The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Updated: 24 min 53 sec ago

Quantum mechanics runs hot in a cold plasma: UBC research

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
University of British Columbia researchers have found a new system that could help yield 'warmer' quantum technologies.
Categories: Content

UCI-led study helps explain Greenland glaciers' varied vulnerability to melting

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Using data from NASA missions observing Earth, researchers at the University of California, Irvine have created new maps of the bed topography beneath a score of glaciers in southeast Greenland, thereby gaining a much better understanding of why some are undergoing rapid retreat and others are relatively stable.
Categories: Content

Researchers link defects in a nuclear receptor in the brain to autism spectrum disorders

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
University of Houston researchers link autism spectrum disorders to defects in a nuclear receptor inside the brain. And just like that, this world-renown team advances the understanding of autism.
Categories: Content

Mystery of purple lights in sky solved with help from citizen scientists

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
When a thin purple ribbon of light appeared and starting glowing in the midnight sky over Regina, Canada, in 2016, Notanee Bourassa knew that what he was seeing was not normal. Having watched the northern lights for almost 30 years, he knew this wasn't an aurora. It was something else.
Categories: Content

Saving lives

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Last year, 81 million people worldwide experienced severe food insecurity. About 80 percent of them live in Africa.While much of that food insecurity relates to civil war and violence in places like South Sudan and Nigeria, a good portion also stems from a sequence of five severe droughts that began in Ethiopia in 2015 and spread across parts of the continent in the ensuing three years.
Categories: Content

Laser-heated nanowires produce micro-scale nuclear fusion

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Nuclear fusion, the process that powers our sun, happens when nuclear reactions between light elements produce heavier ones. It's also happening -- at a smaller scale -- in a Colorado State University laboratory.Using a compact but powerful laser to heat arrays of ordered nanowires, CSU scientists and collaborators have demonstrated micro-scale nuclear fusion in the lab. They have achieved record-setting efficiency for the generation of neutrons - chargeless sub-atomic particles resulting from the fusion process.
Categories: Content

Unraveling how mesenchymal stem cells from gum tissue accelerate wound healing

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania set out to determine whether and how gum-derived stem cells play a role in accelerated wound healing. Their results, indicating that these cells secrete tiny vesicles packed with signaling proteins, point the way forward for therapeutic strategies that aim to harness the prowess of stem cells to treat delayed wound healing as well as other conditions that involve an overactive inflammatory response, such as autoimmune diseases.
Categories: Content

A new method measures the integration or segregation of immigrants based on their tweets

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
An international team led by researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has developed a method to measure the integration or segregation of immigrants based on the messages they write on the social network, Twitter.
Categories: Content

Researchers create 3-D structure of the nuclear pore complex

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
For the first time, researchers have produced a nearly complete three-dimensional structure for the yeast Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). This discovery represents a major step toward identifying the atomic structure of the NPC, which soon may provide researchers with a better understanding of how the central transport channel functions.
Categories: Content

Research team develops clinically-validated 3-D printed stethoscope

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
A team of researchers have developed an open-source, clinically validated template for a 3-D printed stethoscope for use in areas of the world with limited access to medical supplies -- places where a stethoscope could mean the difference between life and death.
Categories: Content

ANU scientists helping to improve understanding of plate tectonics

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) are helping to improve understanding of how rocks in Earth's hot, deep interior enable the motions of tectonic plates, which regulate the water cycle that is critical for a habitable planet.
Categories: Content

Key biological mechanism is disrupted by ocean acidification

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
A team led by scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) has demonstrated that the excess carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere through the combustion of fossil fuels interferes with the health of phytoplankton which form the base of marine food webs.
Categories: Content

Researchers demonstrate existence of new form of electronic matter

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Researchers have produced a 'human scale' demonstration of a new phase of matter called quadrupole topological insulators that was recently predicted using theoretical physics. These are the first experimental findings to validate this theory.
Categories: Content

Leuven researchers uncover ion channel trio that mediates painful heat sensing

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Researchers at VIB and KU Leuven have uncovered a trio of complementary ion channels in sensory neurons that mediate detection of acute, harmful heat. Having three redundant molecular heat-sensing mechanisms provides a powerful fail-safe mechanism that protects against burn injuries. The seminal findings have been published today in Nature.
Categories: Content

Chromatin usage in individual cells reveals developmental trajectories

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Both cell type and developmental stage can be deduced from measurements of chromatin accessibility in thousands of single cells, researchers at EMBL and the University of Washington show. They used this approach to uncover how cells in developing embryos regulate their identity as they decide what kind of cell to become. Nature publishes the results on March 14.
Categories: Content

Scientists find seismic imaging is blind to water

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
MIT and Australian scientists have found that seismic imaging is blind to water, a finding that may lead researchers to reinterpret seismic maps of the Earth's interior.
Categories: Content

Coral reef experiment shows: Acidification from carbon dioxide slows growth

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Ocean acidification will severely impair coral reef growth before the end of the century if carbon dioxide emissions continue unchecked. The paper represents the first ocean acidification experiment in which seawater was made artificially acidic by the addition of carbon dioxide and then allowed to flow across a natural coral reef community. The acidity of the seawater was increased to reflect end-of-century projections if carbon dioxide from greenhouse gas emissions are not abated.
Categories: Content

New imaging approach offers unprecedented views of staph infection

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Eric Skaar, Ph.D., M.P.H., and colleagues at Vanderbilt have combined multiple types of molecular imaging to probe an invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection in the mouse. Their integrated imaging approach, reported this week in Science Translational Medicine, revealed new insights about staph infections and can be broadly applied to any health or disease state.
Categories: Content

Droughts in Mongolia -- past, present and future

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
The extreme wet and dry periods Mongolia has experienced in the late 20th and early 21st centuries are rare but not unprecedented and future droughts may be no worse. An international team of researchers developed a climate record stretching 2,060 years into Mongolia's past using tree rings. The team then combined the tree-ring record of past climate with computer models that can project future regional climate.
Categories: Content

Are sexual minority students less likely to persist in STEM degrees?

Mar 14 2018 - 00:03
Sexual minority students -- lesbian, gay, bisexual and queer -- were less likely than their heterosexual peers to be retained in STEM degrees after four years of college, suggests a new study based on a national survey of more than 4,000 college students. Diversity is crucial in STEM fields, providing a greater likelihood of reaching breakthroughs. However, compared.
Categories: Content