Science2.0

Emoticons Aren't Ruining Language, They're Revolutionizing It

Science2.0 - April 12, 2015 - 1:38pm

txt msgs r running language

*ruining

^lol, jk!! :)

In many casual discussions of language and the internet, it’s not uncommon to hear about how such “textspeak ruins language” – how technology has made everybody lazy with their speech and writing. Major media outlets such as the LA Times, the BBC and The Daily Mail have all bemoaned the ways in which people communicate through technology.


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In-flight Refueling For Commercial Airlines?

Science2.0 - April 12, 2015 - 1:00pm

There’s real pressure on the aviation industry to introduce faster, cheaper and greener aircraft, while maintaining the high safety standards demanded of airlines worldwide.

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Biosynthesis: Renewable Propane

Science2.0 - April 11, 2015 - 6:00pm
Researchers have made a significant breakthrough in the development of synthetic pathways that will enable renewable biosynthesis of the gas propane. 

Natural metabolic pathways for the renewable biosynthesis of propane do not exist but scientists at the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology (MIB), Imperial College and University of Turku have developed an alternative microbial biosynthetic pathway to produce renewable propane.
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In 1921, Baseball Considered Banning Radio Broadcasts

Science2.0 - April 11, 2015 - 4:30pm

In December 2011, when the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and Texas Rangers signed away their local television rights for about $3 billion apiece, the sport media heralded a new record for local television rights fees.

Accounting for roughly 43 percent of MLB’s $8 billion haul in 2014, media revenues have made the players rich and the owners even richer.

Today, the idea that a team would ban its games from being broadcast is unthinkable, so ingrained are TV and radio contracts in the marketing and business practices of the sport.

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Should Caffeine Be A Schedule 1 Drug?

Science2.0 - April 11, 2015 - 4:04pm
According to the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), certain drugs need to be regulated because they are bad. The “worst” drugs are put into the highest schedule. The funny thing about those drugs listed in the schedule 1 category is that preclinical assays of drug abuse have determined that they have relatively weak abuse liability or possibly none at all. From the DEA site, here are the criteria for schedule 1 and the list of example drugs:

Schedule I Controlled Substances

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HD 189733b: Infernal Exoplanet With 500 MPH, 3000 Degree Winds

Science2.0 - April 11, 2015 - 3:46pm
Not all exoplanets are going to be habitable, many will be just the opposite. Astronomers have measured the temperature of the atmosphere of an exoplanet with unequaled precision and determined we won't be vacationing there any time soon. By crossing two approaches, using the HARPS spectrometer and a new way of interpreting sodium lines, researchers have been able to conclude that exoplanet HD 189733b is showing infernal atmospheric conditions, with wind speeds of more than 1,000 kilometers per hour and a temperature 3,000 degrees. 
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The Famed Olive Trees Of Puglia Are Ravaged By Disease – Here's How Science Can Save Them

Science2.0 - April 11, 2015 - 3:05pm


A common, humble field bug is spreading a disease that has already infected millions of olive trees in Italy.

Olive and citrus fruit crops throughout the Mediterranean are threatened, yet there has been a collective failure to recognize the danger and take decisive action.

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Mapping Mitochondria To Better Understand Neuronal Disorders Like Parkinson's Disease

Science2.0 - April 11, 2015 - 2:30pm
Researchers have discovered how nerve cells adjust to low energy environments during the brain's growth process, which may one day help find treatments for nerve cell damage and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

Neurons in the brain have extraordinarily high energy demands due to complex dendrites that expand to high volume and surface areas. It is also known that neurons are the first to die from restriction of blood supply to tissues, causing a shortage of oxygen and glucose needed for cellular metabolism.
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Human Norovirus Might Infect Dogs, Can They Infect Us Back?

Science2.0 - April 11, 2015 - 1:00pm

Human norovirus can cause an immune response in dogs so it leads to obvious concern over whether or not dogs can transmit it to other people.

Norovirus, which causes vomiting and diarrhea, is extremely contagious among humans. It infects 19-21 million Americans annually - more than six percent of the US population - according to the CDC. Those infections may result in as many as 71,000 hospitalizations, and 800 deaths.
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Glass Is Not Liquid But Metal Can Be Both

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 11:45pm

A very popular urban myth is that window glass is a liquid.  This apparently originated by the recognition that old European cathedrals had windows with the glass being thicker at the bottom than the top.  The actual cause of this is not attributable to gravity pulling the glass downward in a slump but rather the early window manufacturing techniques followed by a common practice of mounting window glass with the thicker side down. 

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What If The Universe Isn't Accelerating The Way We Think?

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 11:25pm
How fast the universe has been expanding since the Big Bang is something of a puzzling question. It wasn't that long enough that we didn't know it was accelerating at all, and a new study finds the acceleration of the expansion of the universe might not be as fast as thought.

The currently accepted view of the universe expanding at a faster and faster rate, pulled apart by an unknown force labeled under the umbrella term 'dark energy', is based on observations that resulted in the 2011 Nobel Prize for Physics. But observations based on uniform type Ia supernovae - cosmic "beacons" - may actually fall into different populations.

That's like comparing 100-watt light bulbs only to find out they vary in brightness. 
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Natural Papain Enzyme In Cosmetics Can Act As Allergen

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 8:40pm
Papain, found naturally in papaya and ioften referred to as a “plant-based pepsin”, is an important industrial protein-degrading enzyme for the food and cosmetic industries. The cosmetic industry uses papain in exfoliating treatments to remove dead surface skin and there even are enzyme-based shampoos for house pets to clean the fur and make it easier to brush. 

But lots of natural things can trigger allergic reactions. 
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Why Does The Pinocchio Lizard Have A Long Nose?

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 6:08pm

For more than 50 years, people said that the "Pinocchio Lizard" (horned anole lizard), called such for its long, protruding nose, was extinct, but that was just a fib by nature. 

In 2005, it was found living at the tops of tall trees in the cloud forests of Ecuador. Like many species that are considered rare or endangered, it is instead the case that there are not many of them and never have been, and they are limited to a small area.

Why the nose? Only the males have long noses, and they appear to be used in social interactions, both among males and between males and females. Previous investigators had wondered if the nasal appendage served as a weapon of some sort in male-male interactions.


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Biofuel Subsidy Pitfall: Carbon-Emitting Conversion Of Millions Of Acres Of Grassland

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 4:35pm
In 2005, environmentalists got what they and former Vice-President Al Gore had lobbied for since the late 1980s; federal subsidies to commercialize biofuels. Mr. Gore later admitted that he was just endorsing biofuels to get corn belt votes for his presidential run and few academic scientists had publicly disagreed because, well, they voted for him.

The result of the last corporate subsidy effort: Corn and soy growers have been happy, to be sure, but poor people got rising food costs and biofuels remain even more of a net penalty to the environment than regular gasoline.
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Climate Change May Accelerate Carbon Loss From Soils

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 2:28pm

Soil is considered e a semi-permanent storehouse for ancient carbon but it may instead be releasing carbon dioxide to the atmosphere faster than thought, which means that the carbon bomb not happening in one study could be happening in this other one published in Nature Climate Change.

In the paper, researchers showed that chemicals emitted by plant roots act on carbon that is bonded to minerals in the soil, breaking the bonds and exposing previously protected carbon to decomposition by microbes.


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Pediatric Cholesterol Guidelines For Young Adults Would Mean 400,000 More Statin Users

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 2:23pm

Sometimes guidelines cause people to be on medication who otherwise would not need to be. We have seen this concern due to runaway claims about the nebulous "pre-diabetes" diagnoses being discussed, and in commercials on television for prescription products to prevent anaphylaxis even though 0.05% of kids is ever going to be at risk and they are exploiting the allergy fad culture to make money.


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KRAS Gene Hijacks Pancreatic And Lung Cancer Defenses

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 1:30pm

A vital self-destruct switch in cells is hijacked - making some pancreatic and non small cell lung cancers more aggressive, according to new research which found that mutations in the KRAS gene interferes with protective self-destruct switches, known as TRAIL receptors, which usually help to kill potentially cancerous cells.

The research, carried out in cancer cells and mice, shows that in cancers with faulty versions of the KRAS gene these TRAIL receptors actually help the cancer cells to grow and spread to new areas in the body. These KRAS faults occur in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers - pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma - and 30 percent of non small cell lung cancers.


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Is Science Better Than Journalism At Self-Correction?

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 1:00pm


Rolling Stone’s retraction of an incendiary article about an alleged gang rape on the campus of the University of Virginia certainly deserves a place in the pantheon of legendary journalism screw-ups. It is highly unusual – although not unprecedented – for a news organization to air its dirty laundry so publicly.

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Rural Black Women Have Less Depression And Mood Disorders

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 1:00pm

African-American women who live in rural areas have lower rates of major depressive disorder (MDD) and mood disorder compared with their urban counterparts, while rural non-Hispanic European-American women have higher rates for both than their urban counterparts, according to a new study.

Major depressive disorder is a debilitating mental illness and the prevalence of depression among both African- and Rural-Americans is understudied, according to background in the study. Addie Weaver, Ph.D., of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and coauthors examined the interaction of Urban-American vs.Rural-American residence and race/ethnicity on lifetime and 12-month MDD and mood disorder in African-American and non-Hispanic European-American women.


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Long Surgery Delays Common For Melanoma Patients On Medicare

Science2.0 - April 10, 2015 - 12:30pm

Melanoma is the leading cause of skin cancer¬related deaths and surgical excision is the primary therapy for melanoma. It is recommended that melanomas should be excised within 4 to 6 weeks of the diagnostic biopsy because surgical delay may result in the potential for increased illness and death from other malignant neoplasms, along with anxiety and stress. 

In a study that included more than 32,000 cases of melanoma among Medicare patients, approximately 20 percent experienced a delay of surgery that was longer than 1.5 months, and about 8 percent of patients waited longer than 3 months for surgery.


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