Science2.0

Natural Hormone Trigger For Ovulation Could Make IVF Safer

Science2.0 - July 20, 2014 - 2:45pm

Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment.  One in six couples in the UK experiences infertility, and 48,147 women underwent IVF treatment in 2011. 


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Why There's A Bend In The Appalachian Mountain Chain

Science2.0 - July 20, 2014 - 2:30am

The Appalachian mountain chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland— 1,500 miles - except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York.

Why it bends has been a mystery. When the North American and African continental plates collided more than 300 million years ago, the North American plate began folding and thrusting upwards as it was pushed westward into the dense underground rock structure—in what is now the northeastern United States. The dense rock created a barricade, forcing the Appalachian mountain range to spring up.  Yet the bend was cause for speculation.


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Science 2.0: Big Data And Conservation Efforts

Science2.0 - July 19, 2014 - 11:27pm

Though there is a deluge of new information about the diversity and distribution of plants and animals around the globe, conservation efforts outside government science remain very firmly trapped in a 1980s world of fundraising and brochures and cultural name-calling.

But Big Data in a Science 2.0 environment could dramatically boost conservation efforts and biodiversity if it catches on.


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Cervical Cancer Assurance: Negative HPV Test May Be Better Than Negative Pap

Science2.0 - July 19, 2014 - 4:42pm

The human papilloma virus (HPV) is common in humans but it can lead to infection and even cancer so there have been calls to get people vaccinated. 4,000 women will die each year from cervical cancer, which is linked to HPV, and HPV can also cause genital warts and more rare forms of cancer. The two vaccines in use, made by GlaxoSmithKline and Merck, prevent about 70 percent of cervical cancer cases and the CDC estimates that 7,000 HPV-associated cancers might be prevented each year with HPV vaccines but uptake has been limited because medical professionals don't like that there have been tens of thousands of adverse reaction reports.

A new study finds that the HPV test alone may be valuable. A study


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Want To Be Happy? Get Some Danish DNA

Science2.0 - July 19, 2014 - 12:00pm

They say money can't buy happiness. Can genetics?

Some people seem to be happy no matter what. If you visit many places in Africa, even when the existence may seem hard to Europeans or Americans, a lot of people are quite happy.

The key could be genetics say....economists.

Why not economists? We let sociologists and anthropologists make all kinds of claims and they don't understand statistics anywhere near as well as the economists from the University of Warwick Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy.


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A Universal Solution For A Quantum Three-Body Problem

Science2.0 - July 19, 2014 - 11:00am
Have physicists conquered the scaling behavior of exotic giant molecules?

When a two-body relation becomes a three-body relation, the behavior of the system changes. The basic physics of two interacting particles is well understood but the mathematical description of a three- or many-body system becomes so difficult that calculating the dynamics can blast the capacities of even modern super computers.

Under certain conditions, the quantum mechanical three-body problem may have a universal scaling solution and  physicists from Heidelberg University say they have experimentally confirmed such a model. The scientists under Prof. Dr. Matthias Weidemüller investigated three-particle molecules, known as trimers, under exotic conditions. 
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Catastrophic Debris Avalanches - The Second Volcanic Hazard After Eruptions

Science2.0 - July 19, 2014 - 5:17am

Volcanic hazards aren't limited to eruptions, debris landslides can also cause a great deal of damage and loss of life. 

Stratovolcanoes, with their steep, conical shapes made up of lava and unconsolidated mixed materials, can reach a critical point of instability when they overgrow their flanks. This leads to partial collapse, and the product of this slope failure is a large-scale, rapid mass movement known as a catastrophic landslide or debris avalanche. 


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High-dose Fluticasone Effective Against Eosinophilic Esophagitis

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 11:23pm

Results from a clinical trial show that high doses of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate safely and effectively induce remission in many people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by high levels of white blood cells called eosinophils. However, some trial participants did not respond to fluticasone even after six months of high-dose treatments, providing evidence that certain people with EoE are steroid-resistant.


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10 Facts About Lupus

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 10:31pm

In the last few months, pop star Selena Gomez and actress Kristen Johnston have said they struggle with lupus, bringing new attention to the autoimmune disease.

They join a list of celebrities such as R&B singer Toni Braxton, Nick Cannon, host of “America’s Got Talent” and Seal, who has a form of the disease that caused the infamous scars on his face. Even Lady Gaga claimed she tested “borderline positive” for lupus.

But while people may be familiar with who has it, many do not know what it actually is.


Selena Gomez. Credit: North Shore LIJ

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Brain Network For Placebo Effects Identified

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 10:19pm

A new image-based strategy helps identify and measure placebo effects in randomized clinical trials for brain disorders. 


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LUX-Zeplin Dark Matter Experiment, Two Others, Get Government Green Light

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 10:00pm

The U.S. Department of Energy has given the green light to the LUX-Zeplin (LZ) experiment, which wants to help figure out dark matter, an invisible substance that must make up a lot more of the universe than visible matter does. It is essentially a scientific placeholder because whatever it is should explain a number of important behaviors of the universe, including the structural integrity of galaxies. 


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Antipsychotic Drugs Linked To Reduced Brain Volume

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 9:19pm

A study out today says has confirmed a link between antipsychotic medication and a measurable, decrease in brain volume in patients with schizophrenia.

The research say this is the first time research has been able to examine whether this decrease is harmful for patients' cognitive function and symptoms, and noted that over a nine year follow-up, this decrease did not appear to have any effect.

As we age, our brains naturally lose some of their volume – in other words, brain cells and connections. This process, known as atrophy, typically begins in our thirties and continues into old age. Researchers have known for some time that patients with schizophrenia lose brain volume at a faster rate than healthy individuals, though the reason why is unclear.


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Probiotics Linked To Diminished Fat Accumulation In The Liver - Study

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 3:30pm

Spanish scientists did an experiment using obese rats and found that the consumption of probiotics over 30 days (equivalent to almost four years in human terms) helped diminish the accumulation of fat in the liver.


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Gopher It: Four New Species Of Tuco-tucos Identified

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 3:01pm

It's uncommon to identify a new species of mammal these days, but four new species of Ctenomys, a genus of gopher-like mammal commonly called tuco-tucos and found throughout much of South America, have been identified.

Tuco-tucos are burrowing rodents ranging from 7 to 12 inches long and weighing less than a pound. They demonstrate the broad range of biological diversity in the lowlands and central valleys of Bolivia, where all four new species were found.


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Shape Program: Less Weight, Less Depression With New Intervention

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 2:34pm

It's a common trope among Hollywood celebrities; media is alarmed at weight gain, celebrity says they are proud of their body, they feel better than ever, people clap, celebrity appears two months later and lost 25 lbs. and is on magazine covers with diet tips and talking about how much better they feel.

Celebrities are externally driven and they add external motivations to boost their willpower, what about people who can't afford personal chefs and trainers? What about regular people who are already demoralized? An intervention program aimed at helping obese women maintain their weight also had the benefit of significantly reducing depression in nearly half the participants, according to a new study.


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How To Takes Pictures At Distances Smaller Than The Wavelength Of Light

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 2:19pm

We all understand light has a wide electromagnetic spectrum and we only see a small band of that. In physics terms, that is between 400 - 700 nanometers and they show up as colors,from violet to red.

We can't see in the ultraviolet radiation spectrum because it is a shorter wavelength than what we can detect - violet - which is why it's in the name, and we can't see infrared because its wavelength is longer than red, which is why the name is infrared. 


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Suicide For Birthday Best Present Ever

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 12:28pm

     Today is my 43rd birthday. When I was 34 years old, I walked along a narrow river through the city of Nanning in the south of China. I was lonely and depressed, no matter the PhD degree I had recently obtained, my freedom, the beauty all around, the women I could easily befriend wherever.

I came to the conclusion that my life is not worth its suffering, and that it must either change, that I must change, or it is idiotic to go on living. I asked myself:

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The Three Important Bacteria And Fungi Living On Your Cheese

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 9:00am

After studying 137 varieties of cheese collected in 10 different countries, systems biologists at Harvard University have been able to identify three general types of microbial communities that live on cheese, opening the door to using each as a "model" community for the study of whether and how various microbes and fungi compete or cooperate as they form communities, what molecules may be involved in the process and what mechanisms may be involved.


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The SUSY-Inspiring LHC WW Excess May Be Due To Theoretical Errors

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 8:57am
A timely article discussing the hot topic of the production rate of pairs of vector bosons in proton-proton collisions has appeared on the Cornell arxiv yesterday. As you might know, both the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, who study the 8-TeV (and soon 13-TeV) proton-proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, have recently reported an excess of events with two W bosons. The matter is discussed in a recent article here.
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Poor People Can't Even Afford To Donate Kidneys

Science2.0 - July 18, 2014 - 4:31am

Kidney donations have been in decline and a study in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN) says it has discovered why; it's cheaper to get a kidney than to give one.  

For their study, Jagbir Gill, MD, MPH of University of British Columbia in Vancouver and his colleagues divided the US population based on the median household income level of residents' zip codes, and they examined the rates of living donation between 1999 and 2010 in high and low income populations.  


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