Science2.0

Boost Your Creativity Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

Science2.0 - April 14, 2016 - 4:26pm

Our brains work on inductance, that is why electricity can take us to a very weird place. But safe levels of electrical stimulation can enhance your capacity to think more creatively, according to a new paper in Cerebral Cortex.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Scientists Discover How To Control Heart Cells Using A Laser

Science2.0 - April 14, 2016 - 4:20pm

Scientists from MIPT's Laboratory of the Biophysics of Excitable Systems have discovered how to control the behaviour of heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) using laser radiation; this study will help scientists to better understand the mechanisms of the heart and could ultimately provide a method of treating arrhythmia. The paper has been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

"Right now this result may be very useful for clinical studies of the mechanisms of the heart, and in the future we could potentially stop attacks of arrhythmia in patients at the touch of a button," says the corresponding author of the study and head of MIPT's Laboratory of the Biophysics of Excitable Systems, Prof. Konstantin Agladze.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Lower-carb Diet Slows Growth Of Aggressive Brain Tumor In Mouse Models

Science2.0 - April 14, 2016 - 4:20pm

GAINESVILLE, Fla. -- University of Florida Health researchers have slowed a notoriously aggressive type of brain tumor in mouse models by using a low-carbohydrate diet.

A high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that included a coconut oil derivative helped reduce the growth of glioblastoma tumor cells and extended lifespan in mouse models by 50 percent, researchers found. The results were published recently in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.

Glioblastoma, the most common brain tumor in adults, has no effective long-term treatment and on average, patients live for 12 to 15 months after diagnosis, according to the National Cancer Institute.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

The Cozier The Better For Bubbles Inside Powerful Volcanoes

Science2.0 - April 14, 2016 - 4:20pm

How did the eruptions of Katmai, Taupo and Santorini grow into a massive blast that spewed fine ash, sulfur and crystal-poor magma into the atmosphere? New research from Georgia Institute of Technology and Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zurich (ETH) suggests they occurred due in part to how light vapor bubbles migrate and accumulate in some parts of shallow volcanic chambers. The findings are published online by Nature.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Family Dynamics Cause Major Stress For Latino Immigrant Families

Science2.0 - April 14, 2016 - 4:20pm

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Commitment to family is both a driving force and source of hardship for Latino immigrants, according to a Florida State University researcher.

Threats to familismo -- deeply held cultural beliefs about the centrality of family in daily life -- are often a major source of stress for immigrants and can have a negative impact on their overall health and well-being as they move forward in a new country.

Joseph Grzywacz, the Norejane Hendrickson professor of Family and Child Sciences at Florida State, outlined those findings in an article that will be published in an upcoming issue of Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. It is available now online.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Dino Dinner, Dead Or Alive

Science2.0 - April 14, 2016 - 4:20pm

  • Many meat-eating dinosaurs may have been expert scavengers, like hyenas are today

  • Researchers from Trinity College Dublin created 'Sims-like' computer models to recreate prehistoric ecosystems and put competing theories to the test
  • Mid-sized meat-eaters, such as juvenile Tyrannosaur rexes, would have been the most efficient scavengers

  • read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Spreading Seeds By Human Migration

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 9:07pm

    RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- Using DNA collected from corn grown by immigrant farmers in Los Angeles and Riverside, researchers at the University of California, Riverside have found the genetic diversity of corn in some home and community gardens in Southern California far exceeds levels found in commercially available seeds.

    The researchers cautioned that this is a preliminary study with a small sample size. Future research would expand to include a greater number of gardens, and focus on characteristics of the corn, such as tolerance to drought, difference in cob size and flowering time.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Only Half Of Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Receiving Standard Therapy

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 9:07pm

    ATLANTA - Month date, 2016-While use of the standard therapy leading to the best outcome against locally advanced rectal cancer has increased over the past decade, only half of patients currently receive it, according to a new study. The authors of the study say the underutilization could be explained in part by socioeconomic factors. The study appears early online in the American Cancer Society's peer-review journal Cancer.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Some Frogs Are Adapting To Deadly B. Dendrobatridis Pathogen

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 9:06pm

    The fungal pathogen Batrachochrytrium dendrobatridis (Bd), which has been known to cause the disease chytridiomycosis and decimate frog populations for close to half a century, is causing frogs to evolve around it, according to a new study which took a step toward identifying the genetic mechanisms that makes some frogs resistant to Bd infections in their study of lowland leopard frogs in Arizona. 


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    No Evidence Drilling Caused Earthquake In Texas, Finds New Study

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 4:23pm

    The most comprehensive analysis to date of a series of earthquakes that included a 4.8 magnitude event in East Texas in 2012 didn't find evidence that the earthquakes were caused by wastewater injection - and they the difficulty of trying to claim earthquakes were caused by human activity, at least using currently available subsurface data.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Why Bearcats Smell Like Buttered Popcorn

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 4:18pm

    DURHAM, N.C. -- The bearcat. The binturong. Whatever you call this shy, shaggy-haired creature from Southeast Asia, many people who have met one notice the same thing: it smells like a movie theater snack bar.

    Most describe it as hot buttered popcorn. And for good reason -- the chemical compound that gives freshly made popcorn its mouthwatering smell is also the major aroma emitted by binturong pee, finds a new study.

    Most people have never heard of a binturong, let alone caught a whiff of one up close. But for many zookeepers, the smell wafting from the binturong enclosure is so striking that they name their resident binturongs after the popular snack.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    A New Roundworm Species From India Is A Link Between 2 Genera

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 4:15pm

    The unique features and blending characters of a new roundworm species, discovered in India, make the nematode a distinct yet intermediary or connecting link between two supposedly distant genera. The new worm is a hermaphrodite that primarily feeds on bacteria. The study, conducted by a research team from the Aligarh Muslim University, India, led by Dr Qudsia Tahseen, is published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Spotting DNA Repair Genes Gone Awry

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 4:15pm

    April 13, 2016, NEW YORK, NY - Researchers led by Ludwig Cancer Research scientist Richard Kolodner have developed a new technique for sussing out the genes responsible for helping repair DNA damage that, if left unchecked, can lead to certain cancers.

    Genome instability suppressing (GIS) genes play an important role in correcting DNA damage involving the improper copying or reshuffling of large sections of chromosomes. Called gross chromosomal rearrangements, or GCRs, these structural errors can disrupt gene order or even result in an abnormal number of chromosomes.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    How Climate Change Dries Up Mountain Streams

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 2:37pm

    The western United States relies on mountain snow for its water supply. Water stored as snow in the mountains during winter replenishes groundwater and drives river runoff in spring, filling reservoirs for use later in summer. But how could a warming globe and a changing climate interrupt this process?

    In a new study in Environmental Research Letters, a team of hydrologists that includes University of Utah professor Paul Brooks answers that question by simulating isolated climate change effects on Rocky Mountain stream systems, varying the type of precipitation (rain vs. snow) and the amount of energy (temperature) in the system. The answer, they found, depends less on how water enters the stream watershed, and more on how it leaves.


    -->

    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Consensus On Consensus

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 2:37pm

    A research team confirms that 97 percent of climate scientists agree that climate change is caused by humans. The group includes Sarah Green, a chemistry professor at Michigan Technological University.

    "What's important is that this is not just one study--it's the consensus of multiple studies," Green says. This consistency across studies contrasts with the language used by climate change doubters. This perspective stems from, as the authors write, "conflating the opinions of non-experts with experts and assuming that lack of affirmation equals dissent."


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Increase In Coffee Consumption Could Provide Protective Effect In Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 2:37pm

    April 13, 2016, Barcelona, Spain: Adding coffee to the diet of people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) could help reverse the condition, according to a new study conducted in mice presented at The International Liver CongressTM 2016 in Barcelona, Spain.

    The study found that a daily dose of coffee (equivalent to six cups of espresso coffee for a 70kg person) improved several key markers of NAFLD in mice that were fed a high fat diet. These mice also gained less weight than others fed the same diet without the dose of caffeine.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    People Who Eat Fast Food Have More Phthalates

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 11:54am

    A recent survey revealed that people who claimed to eat more fast food also had possible exposure of higher levels of phthalates.

    Is that bad? In 2016, when all chemicals are scary, it certainly is, and environmental groups have raised a fortune claiming such chemicals "leach" out of containers and into food. The television show "60 Minutes", which has long promoted health scares, did a story on them and ever since groups like Natural Resources Defense Council (which manufactured one prominent scare, alar on apples, with the left-wing public relations company Fenton Communications) have claimed all kinds of effects using rat studies.


    -->

    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Sorry Kids, Seniors Want To Connect And Communicate On Facebook, Too

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 11:27am

    Older adults, who are Facebook's fastest growing demographic, are joining the social network to stay connected and make new connections, just like college kids who joined the site decades ago, according to Penn State researchers.

    "Earlier studies suggest a positive relationship between bonding and bridging social capital and Facebook use among college students," said Eun Hwa Jung, a doctoral candidate in mass communications. "Our study extends this finding to senior citizens."

    In the study, the desire to stay connected to family and keep in touch with old friends -- social bonding -- was the best predictor of Facebook adoption and use, followed closely by the desire to find and communicate with like-minded people -- social bridging.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Researchers Find New Clue In Lupus Autoantibody Production

    Science2.0 - April 13, 2016 - 11:27am

    A signaling molecule called interferon gamma could hold the key to understanding how harmful autoantibodies form in lupus patients. The finding could lead to new treatments for the chronic autoimmune disease, said researchers at Penn State College of Medicine.

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common form of lupus. In patients with SLE, the immune system forms autoantibodies that attack the body's own cells, causing inflammation and tissue damage. How these rogue antibodies form is an important area of interest for lupus researchers.


    read more

    Categories: Science2.0

    Age Reversing Pills And Other Practical Things To Help You Live Long Enough To Live Forever Kurzweil-style.

    Science2.0 - April 12, 2016 - 6:15pm

    I take Elysium capsules twice a day. I can't tell you if they're doing anything useful vis-à-vis invigorating me on a daily basis.

    -->

    read more

    Categories: Science2.0