Science2.0

Hydraulic Fracturing Correlated To Earthquakes In Ohio

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 10:34pm

Hydraulic fracturing, commonly called fracking, is a way to extract natural gas from shale rock, by using a modern process to inject a high-pressure water mixture at the rock to release the gas inside. By all accounts it has been an environmental boon, responsible for causing energy emissions from coal to plummet back to early 1980s levels without causing energy prices to rise and harm poor people.


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New Amsterdam On Mars Is Bold, But Is It Feasible?

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 10:30pm

The Dutch have always been bold. Not just any culture would make wooden shoes a thing and turn tulip bulbs into a luxury investment. And if you like New York City, you can thank New Amsterdam.

Now Holland wants to be a colonial power again, this time on Mars. The "Mars One" project, announced in 2012, wants to establish the first human colony on the Red Planet by 2025. It's a one-way trip but there is no shortage of people willing to be one of the four that will build the first human settlement in space. 


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There Is No Such Thing As Reptiles Any More – Here's Why

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 9:36pm

No, it's nothing to do with a reptilian existential crisis – just a name game. Credit: melanie cook/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA

By Dustin Welbourne

You have likely been to a zoo at some point and visited their reptile house.

A building where the climate control dial is stuck on the “wet sauna” setting, and filled with maniacal children competing to be the first to press their ice cream covered face and hands on every available piece of clean glass.

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Modern Droughts Are Nothing - 1934 Was The Worst Of The Last 1,000 Years

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 8:21pm

In an instantaneous, 24-hour news cycle, a lot of being made of current U.S. droughts but the 1934 version was 7X larger than other comparable intensity droughts that struck North America between 1000 A.D. and 2005, and nearly 30 percent worse than the next most severe drought that struck the continent in 1580, finds a new analysis.  


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Recent College Graduates See Job Boom

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 5:44pm

Though the American economy remains in a malaise, with alarming numbers of people chronically unemployed for so long they no longer are considered unemployed because they can't get unemployment benefits any more, two areas have been exempt from that - government employees and new college graduates.

Unlike the rest of the economy, those two sections never had negative growth and now hiring is expected to jump a whopping 16 percent for newly minted degree-holders in 2014-15, according to Recruiting Trends, the annual survey by Michigan State University economist Phil Gardner with responses from nearly 5,700 companies. 


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Pregnancy Pressure: Now You Should Watch Diet And Exercise Too

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 5:31pm

Mothers are already responsible for propagating the species, a thankless job which men wisely avoid in all ways, but now they may be tasked with a better diet and exercising more also, because it has been directly associated with a range of improved outcomes at birth by researchers from the University of Adelaide.

They say it is the  biggest study of its kind two papers were published on the findings in BMC Medicine.


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Next-Gen Lighting May Be Flat Panel Lights Based On Carbon Nanotubes

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 4:54pm

The Obama administration only recently banned incandescent bulbs and compact fluorescent bulbs are getting all of the marketing due to generous government subsidies, so light emitting diodes (LEDs) are yet to even get off the cultural ground but researchers are already moving on to their successors. 

Enter carbon electronics.

Electronics based on carbon, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are emerging as successors to silicon for making semiconductor materials. And they may enable a new generation of brighter, low-power, low-cost lighting devices that could challenge the dominance of LEDs in the future and help meet society's ever-escalating demand for greener bulbs. 


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The Rats Of New York

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 4:40pm

It's not a secret that rats carry diseases, they quite literally carried the pests that caused the Bubonic Plague across Europe in the middle ages. But New York City has always felt like their rats were exceptional compared to rats beyond the Hudson River, and so scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health trapped 133 Norway rats at 5 sites in New York City, focusing on rats trapped inside residential buildings.

They examined them for identified bacterial pathogens, including E. coli, Salmonella, and C. difficile, that cause mild to life-threatening gastroenteritis in people; Seoul hantavirus, which causes Ebola-like hemorrhagic fever and kidney failure in humans; and the closest relative to human hepatitis C. 


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Designer Viruses Could Be The New Antibiotics

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 3:01pm

Bacteria under attack by a flock of bacteriophages. Credit: Graham Beards/Wikimedia Commons

By Luc Henry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne

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Antibiotic Resistance At The Ribosome Level

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 2:36pm

High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy has revealed in unprecedented detail the structural changes in the bacterial ribosome which results in resistance to the antibiotic erythromycin.


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Through The Combining Glass To The Future Of Public Interaction

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 1:00pm
In the future, it may be possible to try on clothes even when the shop is closed, thanks to
semi-transparent mirrors in interactive systems presented at the ACM UIST 2014 human-computer interface conference.

The work, led by Professor Sriram Subramanian, Dr. Diego Martinez Plasencia and Florent Bethaut from the University of Bristol’s Department of Computer Science, builds on a mirror’s ability to map a reflection to one unique point behind the mirror, independently of the observer’s location. 
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Why Do Tropical Ecosystems Have Higher Biodiversity?

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 1:00pm
Why is biodiversity is higher in the tropics than in colder regions? It's one of ecology’s unsolved puzzles and has been since the European explorers and naturalists of the 17th and 18th centuries discovered there is a stunningly rich biodiversity in the tropics compared to the temperate regions of the world.

A research effort led by University of Arizona ecologists has now unearthed unexpected answers and helped found a new discipline, they call it functional biogeography, in the process.
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Almost One Third Of UK Lung Cancer Patients Dies Within 3 Months Of Diagnosis

Science2.0 - October 14, 2014 - 12:30pm

Though health care is free, it doesn't always come without a cost. The United Kingdom is behind most countries in lung cancer survival and the big reason is because it goes undiagnosed.

It isn't that people won't go to the doctor due to cost, so it must be that doctors don't pick up the signs of lung cancer and investigate them, say the authors of a new study who analyzed family doctors' (GPs') investigation of lung cancer between 2000 and 2013, using data from The Health Improvement Network (THIN), which contains the anonymized health records of millions of primary care patients across the UK.


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California Earthquakes: 3 Areas Of San Andreas Fault System Overdue

Science2.0 - October 13, 2014 - 10:20pm

Four urban sections of the San Andreas Fault system in Northern California have stored enough energy to produce major earthquakes, according to a new study of 'fault creep', and three fault sections, near Hayward, Rodgers Creek and Green Valley, are nearing or past their average recurrence interval. 


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The Sesame Street Lesson For Physicians

Science2.0 - October 13, 2014 - 9:24pm
More than 2,000,000 people are incarcerated in the United States, the highest incarceration rate in the world - little surprise when abusing a dog is a felony, there are different penalties for attacking a person of one color over another, and judges are given no sentencing leeway in many cases.

Given American willingness to put everyone in jail for whatever cultural lobbyists are advocating this year, it was only a matter of time before Sesame Street introduced a character that has an incarcerated father.
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Do We Want An Augmented Reality Or A Transformed Reality?

Science2.0 - October 13, 2014 - 8:08pm

We are only beginning to see what augmented reality can do. Credit: Flickr/Karlis Dambra, CC BY

By Nick Kelly, University of Southern Queensland

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How To Fill The Antibiotic Void

Science2.0 - October 13, 2014 - 7:04pm
With expensive clinical trials, lawyers waiting to sue, and long approval times unless a disease makes it into the New York Times, pharmaceutical companies are leaving the antibiotic space behind.
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This Is Not My Grandpa's Organic

Science2.0 - October 13, 2014 - 6:50pm
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Gender Stereotypes Prevail In Reports On Suicide

Science2.0 - October 13, 2014 - 5:31pm
If you have read mainstream media reports on suicides, you recognize a common theme: men are painted as angry and rejected, while women are regarded as sociable and mentally ill.

A new analysis of daily newspaper coverage of suicide has far-reaching consequences, write scholars from Medical University of Vienna, because when it comes to suicidal behavior, there is a clear gender paradox: the ratio of men to women who actually commit suicide is three to one, but with attempted suicides it is just the opposite - three women for every one man. 

The authors say the findings demonstrate that the cultural script that bears partial responsibility for this is also found in the reports by Austrian daily newspapers.
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Free Radicals Found Beneficial To Wound Healing

Science2.0 - October 13, 2014 - 4:30pm

While the modern talk is all about how antioxidants and good and free radicals are bad, biology has never been so simple. Rather than being simply destructive to tissues and cells, free radicals generated by the cell's mitochondria—the energy producing structures in the cell—are actually beneficial to healing wounds.

Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are chemically reactive molecules containing oxygen, such as peroxides and they are commonly referred to as free radicals. A new study finds they are necessary for the proper healing of skin wounds in the laboratory roundworm C. elegans.


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