Science2.0

Post-Partum Depression Hits Dads Too

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 10:54pm

Because the majority of prescriptions for depression, are given to women, men don't get a lot of concern, but depression can hit young fathers hard and the symptoms can increase dramatically during the formative years of children.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Ferns Borrowed Genes To Flourish In Low Light

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 10:45pm

DURHAM, N.C. -- During the age of the dinosaurs, the arrival of flowering plants as competitors could have spelled doom for the ancient fern lineage. Instead, ferns diversified and flourished under the new canopy -- using a mysterious gene that helped them adapt to low-light environments.

A team led by Duke University scientists has pinpointed the curious origins of this gene and determined that it was transferred to ferns from a group of unassuming moss-like plants called hornworts. The findings were announced today, April 14, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

A Gene Panels Alternative To Whole-Genome Sequencing

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 10:00pm

Up to 10 percent of women with family history of breast or ovarian cancer have at least one genetic mutation that would prompt their doctors to recommend changes in their care - and it isn't BRCA1 or BRCA2.

The women in the study did not have mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2, which are strongly associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, but they did have mutations in other cancer-associated genes and those were found using a multiple-gene panel to quickly and cheaply sequence just a few possible genetic culprits selected by researchers based on what is known about a disease. Although such panels are becoming widely clinically available, it's not been clear whether their use can help patients or affect medical recommendations.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Logan's Run Was Right: After Age 24, It's All Downhill

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 9:56pm

If you're over 24 years of age you've already reached your peak in terms of your cognitive motor performance, according to a new paper.

Simon Fraser University doctoral student Joe Thompson, associate professor Mark Blair, Thompson's thesis supervisor, and Andrew Henrey, a statistics and actuarial science doctoral student say this in one of the first social science experiments to rest on big data and they tested when we start to experience an age-related decline in our cognitive motor skills and how we compensate for that by analyzing the digital performance records of 3,305 StarCraft 2 players, aged 16 to 44. StarCraft 2 is a competitive intergalactic computer war game that players sometimes play for money. 


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Dogs Benefit Families Of Children With Autism

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 8:36pm

Should you get a pet? If so, a dog or a cat?  For families of children with autism, the decision may have gotten a little easier. A University of Missouri nurse has studied dog ownership decisions in families of children with autism and found, regardless of whether they owned dogs, the parents reported the benefits of dog ownership included companionship, stress relief and opportunities for their children to learn responsibility.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Symbiotic Association: Wasps And Microbes Have Been Faithful Allies Since The Cretaceous

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 8:32pm

Humans depend on microbes for survival. So do most animals and such symbioses can persist for millions of years.

Scientists have discovered that certain wasps tightly control mother-to-offspring transmission of their bacterial symbionts. This stabilizes the symbiotic alliance and contributed to its persistence over the past 68-110 million years.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Popular Medical Websites Too Complex When It Comes To Colon Cancer - Analysis

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 6:40pm

 A review of a dozen popular websites found that information on colorectal cancer is too difficult for most lay people to read and doesn't address the appropriate risks to and concerns of patients.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

The Dual Role Of Carbon Dioxide In Photosynthesis

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 6:35pm

Carbon dioxide, in its ionic form bicarbonate, has a regulating function in the splitting of water in photosynthesis. This means that carbon dioxide has an additional role to being reduced to sugar, according to scientists at Umeå University in Sweden.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Genetically Modified Tobacco Plants As Biofuel

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 3:52pm

Tobacco is a high-density crop that is mowed several times throughout its cycle and that can be a good thing, because it can produce as much as 160 tons of fresh biomass per hectare.

Biomass that is suitable for producing bioethanol.  Smoking cigarettes is bad but renewable energy is good, tobacco just needs some help from science.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Unstable Singlet Oxygen: A Stable Model For An Unstable Target

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 3:44pm

Singlet oxygen is an electronically excited state of oxygen that is less stable than normal oxygen. Its high reactivity has enabled its use in photodynamic therapy, in which light is used in combination with a photosensitizing drug to generate large amounts of singlet oxygen to kill cancer cells or various pathogens. 


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Persistent Organic Pollutant - Slow Degradation Of The Arctic And Antarctic

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 3:13pm

Global warming may be a topic of debate and arguments about measurements and models, but some things are measurable right now, like environmental pollutants. 

Although persistent environmental pollutants are released worldwide, the Arctic and Antarctic regions are significantly more contaminated with persistent organic pollutants than elsewhere; marine animals living there have some of the highest levels of persistent organic pollutant (POP) contamination of any creatures and the Inuit people of the Arctic, who rely on a diet of fish, seals and whales, have also been shown to have higher POP concentrations than people living in our latitudes.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Does Germ Plasm Accelerate Evolution Faster Than Epigenesis?

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 3:03pm

A new paper suggests that genes evolve more rapidly in species containing germ plasm, which
challenges a long held belief about the way certain species of vertebrates evolved. 

The results came about as the researchers put to the test a novel theory that early developmental events dramatically alter the vertebrate body plan and the way evolution proceeds. 


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Wolves At The Door: Study Finds Recent Wolf-dog Hybridization In Caucasus Region

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 2:55pm

Dog owners in the Caucasus Mountains of Georgia might want to consider penning up their dogs more often: hybridization of wolves with shepherd dogs might be more common, and more recent, than previously thought, according to a recently published study in the Journal of Heredity (DOI: 10.1093/jhered/esu014).


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Climate Change: The Role Of Oceanic Carbon Reservoir Over Glacial Cycles

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 2:55pm

Glacial cycles at 104-yr time scale have been the focus of Quaternary paleoclimatology over the last century. In recent years with the emergence of continuous high-resolution records (ice cores, deep-sea sediments etc.) from the longer geological past, increasing evidence underscores the significance of long- duration processes at the time scale of 105-yr or more. WANG Pinxian and colleagues from the State Key Laboratory of Marine Geology, Tongji University, reviewed long-term variations in the oceanic carbon reservoir and indicated their crucial role in major climate regime changes over Quaternary glacial cycles.

read more

Categories: Science2.0

8 More Years Of Life From Glucosamine ? Puhhleaze

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 12:30pm

It’s been all over the news. 

Depending on the accuracy of the headline, you may conclude that worms live longer when exposed to glucosamine, mice live 10 percent longer when fed glucosamine or that YOU will live 8 years longer if you take the stuff.

As usual, the devil is in the headlines.

Some were pretty accurate: Glucosamine promotes longevity in worms and mice, study says (from the L.A. Times). 

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Aldo Menzione And The Design Of The Silicon Vertex Detector

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 9:21am
Below is a clip from a chapter of my book where I describe the story of the silicon microvertex detector of the CDF experiment. CDF collected proton-antiproton collisions from the Tevatron collider in 1985, 1987-88, 1992-96, and 2001-2011. Run 1A occurred in 1992, and it featured for the first time in a hadron collider a silicon strip detector, the SVX. The SVX would prove crucial for the discovery of the top quark.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Google Earth Mystery Object? - Hardly!

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 5:08am
Google Earth Mystery Object? - Hardly!

What is it that you can see in this snapshot of Google Earth in the vicinity of Amsterdam Island?


If you think it's a special antenna for transmitting earthquake waves in the general direction of people that a Secret Government AgencyTM hates, or if you just know that it's a secret underwater base you are probably a conspiracy theorist.

If you think it's Atlantis you are probably some kind of new age hippie.

If you think it's an image artifact you are probably very good at image analysis.  But wrong.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Mechanism, And Possible Treatment, For Immune Suppression In Liver Disease Uncovered

Science2.0 - April 14, 2014 - 3:04am

The mechanism which underlies the susceptibility of liver disease patients to life-threatening infection has been uncovered by Wellcome Trust-funded medical scientists, who have also suggested a possible treatment to reverse immune suppression in these patients.

Liver disease, or cirrhosis, is currently the fifth leading cause of death in the UK. Cirrhosis patients are more than five times more likely to pick up infections in hospital than patients with other chronic conditions, due to reduced immunity which is a well-recognised feature of the disease.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Fish From Acidic Ocean Waters Less Able To Smell Predators

Science2.0 - April 13, 2014 - 9:58pm

"They can smell but they can't distinguish between chemical cues," Dixson said.

Carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere is absorbed into ocean waters, where it dissolves and lowers the pH of the water. Acidic waters affect fish behavior by disrupting a specific receptor in the nervous system, called GABAA, which is present in most marine organisms with a nervous system. When GABAA stops working, neurons stop firing properly.

Coral reef habitat studies have found that CO2-induced behavioral changes, similar to those observed in the new study, increase mortality from predation by more than fivefold in newly settled fish.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Hereditary Trauma

Science2.0 - April 13, 2014 - 9:58pm

The phenomenon has long been known in psychology: traumatic experiences can induce behavioural disorders that are passed down from one generation to the next. It is only recently that scientists have begun to understand the physiological processes underlying hereditary trauma. "There are diseases such as bipolar disorder, that run in families but can't be traced back to a particular gene", explains Isabelle Mansuy, professor at ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich. With her research group at the Brain Research Institute of the University of Zurich, she has been studying the molecular processes involved in non-genetic inheritance of behavioural symptoms induced by traumatic experiences in early life.


read more

Categories: Science2.0