Science2.0

School Lunch: How To Teach Kids To Be Casual Criminals

Science2.0 - August 28, 2015 - 4:51pm
There is a dark undercurrent to Indiana's school culture, according to a recent statement, and it's created a secret smuggling web where young children acquire and trade illegal items.

The good news: The illegal items aren't marijuana or heroin.

The strange news: It's salt.
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Fetal Attraction: How Baby Cells Impact Maternal Health During Pregnancy

Science2.0 - August 28, 2015 - 4:25pm

Parents go to great lengths to ensure the health and well-being of their developing offspring. The favor, however, may not always be returned.

Dramatic research has shown that during pregnancy, cells of the fetus often migrate through the placenta, taking up residence in many areas of the mother's body, where their influence may benefit or undermine maternal health.

The presence of fetal cells in maternal tissue is known as fetal microchimerism. The term alludes to the chimeras of ancient Greek myth--composite creatures built from different animal parts, like the goat-lion-serpent depicted in an Etruscan bronze sculpture.


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We Need To Save Eagles From Wind Turbines - There May Be A Solution

Science2.0 - August 28, 2015 - 1:06pm

If you are a hunter and accidentally shoot an endangered eagle, you could go to jail and you will certainly have a criminal record. If you are a wind turbine company, you kill 100 eagles a year and pay a token fine.  An estimated 75 to 110 golden eagles die at a wind-power generation operation in Altamont, California each year. That is about one eagle for every 8 megawatts of energy produced yet no one is in Federal prison. 


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Colorado Front Range Storm In 2013 Caused 1,000 Years Of Erosion

Science2.0 - August 28, 2015 - 12:00pm

We can be concerned about erosion due to man-made causes but it is nothing like what nature will randomly do in a single year, without ever once consulting Natural Resources Defense Council or other industry-funded groups.

The historic September 2013 storm that triggered widespread flooding across Colorado's Front Range eroded the equivalent of hundreds, or even as much as 1,000 years worth of accumulated sediment from the foothills west of Boulder, researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have discovered. The findings in Geology suggest that erosion may not always be a slow and steady process, like due to housing or shifts in vegetation, but rather can occur in sudden, rapid bursts due to extreme weather events such as hundred- and thousand-year storms.


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Female Soldiers At No Greater Risk For PTSD In New Study Cohort

Science2.0 - August 28, 2015 - 11:30am

While past research on the question has found otherwise, a new study by Defense and Veterans Affairs researchers suggests that women in the military are at no greater risk than men for developing posttraumatic stress disorder, given similar experiences--including combat.

The study involved active-duty troops and veterans who are part of the Millennium Cohort Study. That effort has more than 200,000 participants in all and the new PTSD study included more than 2,300 pairs of men and women who were matched based on an array of variables--including combat exposure--and followed about seven years, on average.


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Stem Cell Research Informed Consent: What To Know

Science2.0 - August 28, 2015 - 12:26am
Ongoing developments in stem cell science mean that researchers often have no idea how, one year down the line, they will use specimens of human biological material.

But when a scientist takes a swab of your saliva, a sample of your blood or a piece of your skin to research a particular disease, how do you know that it’s going to be used for the intended purpose? And when it is used for research in a different condition, can you take any action? This is where informed consent comes in.

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Lettuces Now, What Next - Could Astronauts Get All Their Oxygen And Food From Algae Or Plants?

Science2.0 - August 27, 2015 - 11:09pm

Perhaps you saw the news recently about astronauts in the International Space Station eating their first home grown lettuce? It's just a beginning, but in the future, could they grow all their own food and get all their oxygen from plants?

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Could Astronauts In The ISS Get All Their Oxygen & Food From Algae & Plants?

Science2.0 - August 27, 2015 - 11:09pm

Perhaps you saw the news recently about astronauts in the International Space Station eating their first home grown lettuce? It's just a beginning, but in the future, could they grow all their own food and get all their oxygen from plants? A little known series of experiments in Russia in the 1960s through to the 1980s suggests that they could. The research continues to this day, and we may see the first steps towards such a system taken in space in the near future.

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Why We're Smarter Than Chickens

Science2.0 - August 27, 2015 - 9:39pm

Toronto researchers have discovered that a single molecular event in our cells could hold the key to how we evolved to become the smartest animal on the planet.

Benjamin Blencowe, a professor in the University of Toronto's Donnelly Centre and Banbury Chair in Medical Research, and his team have uncovered how a small change in a protein called PTBP1 can spur the creation of neurons - cells that make the brain - that could have fuelled the evolution of mammalian brains to become the largest and most complex among vertebrates.


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The Spread Of Life Among The Stars

Science2.0 - August 27, 2015 - 8:21pm
One day, it might be possible to detect the spread of life among the stars through panspermia--a hypothetical process of life distributed throughout the Milky Way by asteroids, comets, and even spacecraft. Henry Lin and Abraham Loeb of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics propose, “If future surveys detect biosignatures in the atmospheres of exoplanets,” it ought to be possible to detect the spread of life between stars even without knowing how life spread from host star to host star. That is, we probably wouldn’t be able to detect the mechanisms of panspermia such as asteroid, spacecraft, or what have you. -->

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Environmental Working Group, Gary Hirshberg And Organic Activists - All The Influence Money Can Buy

Science2.0 - August 27, 2015 - 12:30pm

My husband is used to hearing snark about being a lobbyist. As the owner of a lobbying firm in Chicago, he takes most derogatory comments about his profession in stride. So imagine my surprise when he became outraged reading aloud a boilerplate description of Washington lobbyists in our daughter’s new high school textbook:

In reality, many lobbyists in Washington are ‘fixers’ who offer to influence government policies for a price. Their personal connections help to open doors to allow their paying clients to ‘just get a chance to talk’ with top officials.

There was more to get his Irish up:

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Why All That Generic Drug Price Savings Never Happened - Profits Are Too Low To Make Production Worthwhile

Science2.0 - August 27, 2015 - 12:30pm
A man goes into a butcher shop to buy some steak.

Man: "How much is your steak?"
Butcher: "$4.99 a pound."
Man:       "That's ridiculous! The butcher across town sells steak for $3.99 a pound!"
Butcher: "Then buy it from him."
Man:       "I tried, but he's all out."
Butcher:  "Well, when I'm out, I'll sell it for $1.99 per pound!"

Pretty good joke, but even better when it's applied to what's going on now with generic drug prices. That is, assuming you can figure it out.

But, one thing is clear: They are going up, and really fast.
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Reduced Vitamin D And Multiple Sclerosis Risk Linked

Science2.0 - August 27, 2015 - 11:28am

Vitamin D is being blamed for or is linked to curing everything in 2015, and so it is little surprise a paper uses a genetic study to bolster observational evidence that lower vitamin D levels are associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis.


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White Grain Disorder: Fungi Discovered Behind Wheat Disease

Science2.0 - August 27, 2015 - 11:25am

Researchers have unraveled the mystery cause of the emerging wheat disease White Grain Disorder, by isolating three previously undiscovered fungi from infected wheat samples and sequenced their genomes.

Australian wheat exports are worth more than $6 billion a year with diseases costing the industry around $1 billion a year. White Grain Disorder emerged about 20 years ago and has sporadically affected crops in Southern Queensland and South Australia, but until now has been poorly understood.


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Thou Shalt Have One Higgs - $100 Bet Won !

Science2.0 - August 27, 2015 - 9:41am
One of the important things in life is to have a job you enjoy and which is a motivation for waking up in the morning. I can say I am lucky enough to be in that situation. Besides providing me with endless entertainment through the large dataset I enjoy analyzing, and the constant challenge to find new ways and ideas to extract more information from data, my job also gives me the opportunity to gamble - and win money, occasionally.
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Antibodies In The Blood Provide Clues To Transplant Recipients' Likelihood Of Rejection

Science2.0 - August 26, 2015 - 9:59pm

The dominant antibody type present in the blood of transplant recipients may indicate their likelihood of experiencing organ rejection, according to a study which may help doctors identify patients who need aggressive treatments to safeguard the health of their new organ.

Transplant recipients who receive a kidney, heart, or lung often develop an immune response to the foreign tissue in the form of antibodies referred as donor-specific HLA antibodies. Some patients may already have these antibodies before their transplant because they have been exposed to blood products or previous transplants. Although the presence of donor-specific HLA antibodies in a recipient is usually not a good sign, not all patients who have them experience a poor outcome.


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Feminists Believe Heterosexual Marriage Is Oppressive, Says Sociologist - And Surveys Prove It

Science2.0 - August 26, 2015 - 2:53pm

Women are more likely than men to initiate divorces, but not to end non-marital relationships, according to Michael Rosenfeld, an associate professor of sociology at Stanford University.

Rosenfeld's analysis relies on survey data from the 2009-2015 waves of the nationally representative How Couples Meet and Stay Together survey. He considers 2,262 adults, ages 19 to 94, who had opposite sex partners in 2009. By 2015, 371 of these people had broken up or gotten divorced. 


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Kashi GoLean Non-GMO Project Cereal Has Traces Of Glyphosate

Science2.0 - August 26, 2015 - 1:00pm
Not only does organic food have pesticides, which the $100 billion Big Organic industry would rather you forget, but it even has synthetic pesticides.

And that "Non-GMO Project" project sticker won't save you, because some boxes of Kashi GoLean Original cereal may have been "verified" by that piece of paper also, yet the food still had glyphosate, according to an analysis by another activist group. 
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Like Cigarettes Or Booze, E-Cigarettes Can Be Dangerous To Children

Science2.0 - August 26, 2015 - 1:00pm

As the use of e-cigarettes has risen dramatically in the United States in recent years, so have calls to poison centers about them, yet most parents are unaware of potential dangers.

The devices are used like cigarettes but instead of tobacco, they vaporize a liquid mixture of nicotine, glycerin and glycol ethers. If ingested, a teaspoon of this "e-liquid" can be lethal to a child, and smaller amounts can cause nausea and vomiting that may necessitate a trip to the  emergency room. In a few cases, exposure to skin has also sickened children.


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Processing Changes Could Lead To Better-tasting Grocery Store Tomatoes

Science2.0 - August 26, 2015 - 12:30pm

Tomato lovers rejoice: Adding or rearranging a few simple steps in commercial processing could dramatically improve the flavor of this popular fruit sold in the grocery store, according to researchers.

"Ideally, tomatoes should be picked ripe and then sold immediately, as they are at farm stands," says Jinhe Bai, Ph.D. But this isn't always possible for commercially sold tomatoes, which are often stored and then shipped over long distances.

To prevent tomatoes from becoming too ripe before they reach the store, growers pick them when they are still green. Packers then use a gas called ethylene to trigger fruit ripening, and after that the tomatoes are stored and shipped at low temperatures.


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