Culture

An analysis of trends in sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) over the past two decades finds that the drop in such deaths that took place following release of the 1992 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) "back to sleep" recommendations, did not occur in infants in the first month of life.

A circle of life-and nitrogen-is playing out in farms across the United States. And researchers are trying to get the timing right.

Some cover crops, such as hairy vetch or cereal rye, are not grown to be eaten. Instead, they capture nutrients, including nitrogen, from previous crops, the air, and the soil. When cover crops decompose, these nutrients are released. Cash crops, such as corn or soybean, planted afterward can use these nutrients to grow and thrive.

Clonal ants appear to be diverse in responding to sweetened water, suggesting epigenetic regulation in behavioral variation and colony survival.

Genetically identical 'clonal ants' show surprising diversity in their attraction to sweetness, according to new research in the journal Royal Society Open Science. While differences in behavior and preferences among a species are usually attributed to genetic variation, the cause of multiple 'phenotypes' is less clear-cut for ants that are identical clones.

A new technique pioneered by UCLA researchers could enable scientists in any typical biochemistry laboratory to make their own gene sequences for only about $2 per gene. Researchers now generally buy gene sequences from commercial vendors for $50 to $100 per gene.

The approach, DropSynth, which is described in the January issue of the journal Science, makes it possible to produce thousands of genes at once. Scientists use gene sequences to screen for gene's roles in diseases and important biological processes.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- There is an optimal point to how much money it takes to make an individual happy, and that amount varies worldwide, according to research from Purdue University.

At a remarkable site in northwest Saudi Arabia, a CNRS archaeologist[1] and colleagues from the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) have discovered camelid sculptures unlike any others in the region. They are thought to date back to the first centuries BC or AD.[2] The find sheds new light on the evolution of rock art in the Arabian Peninsula and is the subject of an article published in Antiquity (February 2018).

The first and most important decision that reproductive females have to make is to select a male of their own species for mating. In order to avoid costly heterospecific matings they have to be able to distinguish whether a male belongs to their own species or not. Scientists of the German Primate Center (DPZ) - Leibniz Institute for Primate Research found out that wild red-fronted lemurs (Eulemur rufifrons) appear to be able to recognize conspecfics by facial color pattern variations.

New York, 12 February 2018 - Counter-terror efforts based on widely-held assumptions about the ideological motivations of children and youth recruited into extremist groups are unlikely to be effective, and could backfire, concludes new research released today by the United Nations University (UNU), a UN think-tank.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- As Valentine's Day approaches, it's reassuring to know many of us are equipped with the basic psychological instincts to have a successful intimate relationship that lasts.

New research from Florida State University highlights ways to keep love and also identifies clear predictors for failed relationships.

A team of optics researchers from the University of Central Florida has demonstrated the first-ever nonmagnetic topological insulator laser, a finding that has the potential to substantially improve the efficiency, beam quality, and resilience of semiconductor laser arrays.

These results are presented in two research papers, one describing the theory of topological lasers and the other experiments, published in Science.