Science2.0

This Dog Can Detect Thyroid Cancer - By Sniffing Human Urine Samples

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 4:00pm
A trained scent dog has been found to accurately distinguish between benign and cancerous urine samples of thyroid cancer patients a terrific 88.2 percent of the time, according to a new study.

That canine diagnostic accuracy is only slightly less than that of fine-needle aspiration biopsy, the method generally used first to test thyroid nodules for cancer - but it is noninvasive and inexpensive. 
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

GC-1: It's Experimental, It's Untested, And It Could Be The Future Of Weight Loss

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 3:37pm
An experimental compound known as GC-1 causes loss of weight and fat in mice in lab tests. The drug speeds up metabolism, or burning off, of fat cells, by activating the receptors for thyroid hormone, which play a role in regulating metabolism - the body's conversion of food into energy. Thyroid hormone receptors also help with adaptive thermogenesis, in which the body converts excess energy (calories and fat) to heat.

Until recently, there was no evidence that human adults had  energy-burning, "good" brown fat. It was only known that animals and human infants did  but now it is known that human adults do have brown fat, but it appears to lose its calorie-burning activity over time.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Bee Bailout: If Dollars Rule The World, Why Isn't The Ecosystem 'Too Big To Fail'?

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 3:24pm

Attempts to put a dollar value on the natural world – so-called “natural capital” or “ecosystem services” – have produced some frankly staggering numbers. A seminal 1997 paper valued the world’s ecosystem services at US$33 trillion (A$42 trillion) a year. This estimate was controversial, given that it dwarfed the entire global market economy, which at the time stood at roughly US$18 trillion a year.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Statins Increase Risk Of Developing Diabetes By 46 Percent

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 3:15pm

New research published in Diabetologia shows that use of statins is associated with a 46% increase in the risk of developing diabetes, even after adjustment for confounding factors. The study is by Professor Markku Laakso, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital, Finland, and colleagues.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

50 Percent Of Management Is Women, Why So Few CEOs?

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 3:00pm

The number of women in paid employment has risen significantly over the past 40 years. In developed countries especially, there are increasing numbers of women reaching top positions in different fields of work. And new research shows how girls are doing far better than boys educationally across the world.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

No Link Between Psychedelics And Mental Health Problems - And May Improve It

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 2:58pm

The use of psychedelics, such as LSD and magic mushrooms, does not increase a person's risk of developing mental health problems, according to an analysis of information from more than 135,000 randomly chosen people, including 19,000 people who had used psychedelics, sponsored by an LSD advocacy group in Norway. The results are in Journal of Psychopharmacology.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Mitochondrial 'Shield' That Helps Cancer Cells Survive Identified

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 2:00pm

Why can cancer cells be so resilient, even when faced with the onslaught of nearly toxic drug cocktails, radiation, and even our own immune system?

A new research report appearing in the March 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal, shows that intermediate filaments formed by a protein called "vimentin" or VIF, effectively "insulate" the mitochondria in cancer cells from any attempt to destroy the cell. Under normal circumstances, VIF serves as the "skeleton" for cells by helping them maintain their shapes.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

'Lone Warrior' Entrepreneur Mythology Penalizes Women

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 1:30pm

Sunday marks the 106th celebration of International Women’s Day.

Since New Yorkers first celebrated it in 1909, American women have made great strides toward equality in the workplace, politics and at home. Long gone are the days when women couldn’t vote or sex discrimination was blatant and legal.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Cellular Sequencing Technology Provides Deeper Look At Mitochondrial Inherited Disease Risk

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 4:13am

A new sequencing technique may provide a clearer picture of how genes in mitochondria, the "powerhouses" that turn sugar into energy in human cells, shape each person's inherited risk for diabetes, heart disease and cancer, according to a study.

The powerful new tool may help researchers better explain why some people get sick and others do not despite being the same age and weight, or having the same bad habits (e.g. smoking). Researchers have long sought to determine these risks by looking at diet and variations in nuclear genes inherited from both parents. These analyses have left out differences in mitochondrial genes (mtDNA), the second kind of DNA in every cell, which we inherit from our mothers.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

Dogger Bank: Submerged Island Is The Perfect Spot For The World's Biggest Wind Farm

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 3:25am

Planning permission has been given for what could become the world’s largest offshore wind farm on the Dogger Bank, off England’s east coast.

If fully constructed, the project will have up to 400 turbines with a total generation capacity of 2.4 GW. That’s enough to power 1.9 million households – more than Manchester and Birmingham combined.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Destination Ceres: Inside The Dawn Spacecraft's Revolutionary Ion Engine

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 2:30am

The NASA spacecraft Dawn has spent more than seven years traveling across the Solar System to intercept the asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres.

Now in orbit around Ceres, the probe has returned the first images and data from these distant objects.

But inside Dawn itself is another first – the spacecraft is the first exploratory space mission to use an electrically-powered ion engine rather than conventional rockets.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Human Activity May Be Supporting Growth Of Harmful Algae In Lakes

Science2.0 - March 7, 2015 - 2:05am

Intensified land-use, sewage discharge, and climate change have likely favored disproportionate development of harmful algae in freshwaters. A new study found that blooms of one type of harmful algae, called cyanobacteria, have increased disproportionately over the past two centuries relative to other species, with the greatest increases since 1945.
Cyanobacteria pose a serious threat to drinking water sources worldwide because they can release toxins into the surrounding environment.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

University 'Ethics Boards' As A Way To Evade Scientific Controversy

Science2.0 - March 6, 2015 - 11:19pm

Evaluations of research ethics do not benefit from a tick-box approach. 

Australia’s social science research, like that in most developed countries since the infamous Milgram experiments took place at my alma mater in 1961, occurs under the watchful eye of ethics boards.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Mitochondria - The Chemists' Organelle

Science2.0 - March 6, 2015 - 6:48pm
I am writing a book on mitochondria and after a few months of research you begin to see a common thread - serendipity.  Sometimes big things happen because of what seems to be luck, a group of people all happen to be in one place at one time, they are all spurred on by each other and then dramatic things occur. 
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Obsessing Over Gender Differences In Test Scores Won’t Fix Anything

Science2.0 - March 6, 2015 - 4:30pm

New gaps are opening up in educational achievement between teenage boys and girls, according to a comprehensive new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

Analysis of its 2012 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) tests of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematics and science across countries, shows that unfortunately, patterns between the performance of girls and boys have not changed much over time, although some of the gaps have closed a little.

-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Fast Food Commercials Aimed At Kids 'Deceptive'

Science2.0 - March 6, 2015 - 4:26pm
Fast food advertising doesn't emphasize healthy menu items enough, and by giving away toys in things like Happy Meals restaurants are being deceptive even by their own self-regulation standards, according to scholars who showed 100 children aged 3–7 years McDonald’s and Burger King children and adult meal ads, randomly drawn from ads that aired on national U.S. television from 2010–11.

After seeing the ad, children were asked to recall what they had seen and transcripts evaluated for descriptors of food, healthy food (apples or milk), and premiums/tie-ins. All children’s ads contained images of healthy foods, like apples and milk, but premiums/tie-ins were recalled much more frequently than healthy food.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Deadly Frog Fungus Dates Back To 1880s

Science2.0 - March 6, 2015 - 3:42pm

A deadly fungus responsible for the extinction of more than 200 amphibian species worldwide has coexisted harmlessly with animals in Illinois and Korea for more than a century, a pair of studies have found.

Amphibians in Illinois have been coexisting with the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd, for at least 126 years without adverse effects seen in other parts of the world such as mass-die offs, according to research published Jan. 13 in the journal Biological Conservation. In a study published March 4 in PLOS ONE, researchers were able to date the fungus in Korea back to 1911. The results will help scientists better understand the disease caused by Bd, chytridiomycosis, and the conditions under which it can be survived.


read more

Categories: Science2.0

What Does Space Smell Like?

Science2.0 - March 6, 2015 - 3:00pm

You can see it through a telescope, or watch a documentary about it, but you can't stick your nose out and take a whiff. Speaking of Chemistry returns this week to answer the very important question, "What does space smell like?" Matt Davenport, Ph.D., reveals the stinky secrets of the cosmos from the people who have been there.


Categories: Science2.0

Gender Gap In School Sets Women In Science Up To Fail

Science2.0 - March 6, 2015 - 2:59pm

Only 14% of young women who enter university for the first time chose science-related fields of study such as engineering, manufacturing and construction. This is one of the headline findings of a new report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development that examines gender equality in education across 64 countries and jurisdictions. In comparison, 39% of young men who entered university chose to pursue one of those fields of study.


-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0

Ocean Tides Have Changed Significantly Over The Last Century

Science2.0 - March 6, 2015 - 2:55pm
Ocean tides have changed significantly over the last century at many coastal locations around the world, according to a paper in Earth’s Future, and increases in high tide levels and the tidal range were found to have been similar to increases in average sea level at several locations.

Average sea levels are rising but tide levels have undergone little change on decadal time scales, nor will they change much over the next century, so long-term changes in tides are not a concern in computer models trying to predict the effects of rising sea levels.
-->

read more

Categories: Science2.0